Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPolygraphs
IN THE NEWS

Polygraphs

NEWS
November 14, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state Court of Appeal ruled Monday that cities and counties may require applicants for jobs as police officers to submit to polygraph tests about their character and background. In a 2-1 decision, the panel rejected claims that such testing violated the state constitutional right to privacy or conflicted with statutes that bar such tests for public safety officers already on the job.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, in an unusual move, Wednesday released results of a polygraph test he passed in which he denied taking part in a cover-up to protect former President Ronald Reagan in the Iran-Contra scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2005 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
Former public relations executive Douglas R. Dowie will not be allowed to introduce the results of a privately administered polygraph test at his upcoming trial on charges of padding bills to the Department of Water and Power, a federal judge has ruled. U.S. District Judge Gary A. Feess said that if Dowie "wants to present his side ... he is free to do so by taking the stand and testifying at trial, at which time he will be subject like all other witnesses to cross-examination."
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOYLE MCMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Donald P. Gregg, a top aide to George Bush when he was vice president, failed a 1990 FBI polygraph test on his knowledge of the Iran-Contra scandal--evidence that, while not admissible in court, has nevertheless encouraged prosecutors to continue their investigation of his role, sources say. Gregg, now U.S. ambassador to South Korea, has testified repeatedly that he did not know about the efforts of White House aide Oliver L. North to supply weapons to Nicaraguan rebels in 1985 and 1986, when U.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The CIA has been known to catch spies by strapping them to polygraph machines. The FBI routinely nabs crooks--and clears innocent people--in the same fashion. And if California courts allowed it, jurors in O.J. Simpson's criminal trial would have heard that the Hall of Famer failed a polygraph examination after his arrest in the killings of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL
A state Senate committee approved a bill last week that would bar nearly all employers from suggesting applicants take a lie detector test as a condition of employment, officials said. The bill, written by Sen. Richard Alarcon (D-Sylmar), also would require employers that administer polygraphs, including police departments, to videotape the sessions and make them available to the applicants, Alarcon said.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
The Senate Thursday overwhelmingly passed legislation that would sharply limit the use of "lie detector" tests by businesses to screen job applicants or employees, maintaining that thousands of workers are being subjected to unreasonable suspicion. The Senate, whose action reflects an unusually wide coalition of liberals and conservatives, voted 69 to 27 for the bill, despite vigorous opposition by business groups and the Reagan Administration.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Federated Group, a big electronics retailer, has agreed to pay $12.1 million to settle a lawsuit brought on behalf of applicants or employees who were forced to take lie-detector tests in order to get or keep a job, lawyers for the plaintiffs said Wednesday. The class-action suit, initially brought by four unsuccessful job applicants, was brought under a 1963 California law that forbids polygraphs as a condition of employment or continued employment and under a state constitutional guarantee of the right to privacy.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police departments investigating reports of missing or abducted children should assume foul play and quickly ask parents to submit to polygraph tests, according to a new Justice Department report. Advance copies of the 220-page manual, billed as a guide to case investigation and program management, were used by law enforcement agencies investigating the South Carolina case of Susan Smith, who reported the abduction of her two sons Oct. 25 but was charged with their murder last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court panel on Wednesday sharply questioned whether details of lie detector tests flunked by former FBI Agent Richard W. Miller before his arrest as a Soviet spy should have been repeatedly presented to jurors who convicted Miller of espionage. At an unusually long, two-hour hearing, three judges of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals voiced serious concerns about the use of polygraph evidence in both of Miller's espionage trials in Los Angeles federal court.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|