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Pompous

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2010 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
One night a few years back, a California communications executive named Deborah Bowker was worried about her husband, who was sick and hospitalized. An old friend told her she shouldn't be alone, that she should come over and stay the night. The guest bedroom at the friend's house was used most often by grandchildren, and contained two tiny beds. That night, Bowker was crying herself to sleep in one of them when the door cracked open. Without a word, Carly Fiorina padded across the room and crawled into the other bed. Bowker and Fiorina have been close friends since they went to MIT together, and little changed for 20 years ?
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NEWS
August 19, 1994 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Welter writes a humor column for a North Carolina newspaper, which is what's best and worst about this endearingly weird novel. He's very good at what he does, which is being funny, but his event is the sprint. Problems arise when he has to run a half-marathon. Welter's hero, Doyle Coldiron, is a disaffected member of the Secret Service, wasting his lonely life preparing for crises that may never take place.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be your basic thief-trains-monkey-to-steal-jewelry comedy, but there were enough people falling into fountains, food fights and irreverent raspberries in "Dunston Checks In" to keep the 12-and-under set amused. "It was really funny, but it was probably funnier for littler kids," concluded Kelli Engler, 11, of Irvine. For Kelli, the movie's highlights included the orangutan's flappy lipped "pffft" salute to stupid adults, his scaling of the high-rise hotel as if it were a palm tree and his soulful, "puppy-dog" eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1994 | DANIEL CERONE, Daniel Cerone is a Times staff writer. and
Behind a glass partition in a small, wood-paneled recording studio on the Sony Pictures Entertainment lot, Jon Lovitz reads and rereads some lines of dialogue into a big black microphone. Flanking him on the other side of the glass, giving him patient directions and guidance, are Al Jean and Mike Reiss, the two unassuming guys who wrote his lines. Jean and Reiss, self-described nerds in high school, rose from staff writers to executive producers of "The Simpsons," which they left after last season to create ABC's new series "The Critic."
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Dec. 1, 1987, was one of the worst days of Ben Stein's life. That was the day Joan Rivers tearfully announced that she was slapping a $50-million libel suit on Gentlemen's Quarterly magazine and Bert Hacker, the pseudonym of the writer who penned the piece about her. Ben Stein, you see, is Bert Hacker. Sort of. "You can say I wrote a draft of the story," he says in his Beverly Hills office.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2009 | Robin Abcarian
Vice President Joe Biden often joked on the campaign trail about his wife's lofty educational achievements. She had two master's degrees and had already worked for nearly a quarter-century as a college community instructor. But he had a better idea. "Why don't you go out and get a doctorate and make us some real money?" he said he told her. (That was always good for a laugh, especially in university towns.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1997 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Levine knows all the stories. The gray-haired man talking with his wife over in the corner is a mob lawyer from the Midwest. The stout, mustachioed gentleman opposite him is a Mexican drug lord holding court with his extended family, complete with mournful wife, bored-looking daughter and solicitous son-in-law. Scattered about elsewhere in the linoleum-tiled waiting room on visiting day in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm is a Times staff writer
"The rain in Spain falls mainly in the plain" is not just a catchy old refrain. Yes, it's the number from "My Fair Lady" in which professor Henry Higgins coaxes the cockney girl Eliza Doolittle to speak like a proper lady. But it also illustrates the dominant method used to teach generations of American actors to speak like, well, proper actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1989
Whoever coined the words pompous, arrogant and egotistical must have had Bryant Gumbel in mind. KENNETH TRITES San Pedro
SPORTS
September 14, 1985
About that pompous Raider commercial: It's not an event, it's a way of life. So is sleeping. ADAM KUCIA Canoga Park
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