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MAGAZINE
September 7, 1986
"New Strategies Against an Old Enemy" (by David DeVoss, July 20) relied upon inflammatory language and innuendo to point an accusing finger at the business community. The story does manage to mention that air quality in the Los Angeles Basin is improving. This is due in large part to the implementation of the strictest air-quality controls in the nation--and to voluntary industry compliance that the article pooh-poohs. Our El Segundo facility is operated by employees who are nearly all residents of the basin, which is why so many of them take a personal interest in our environmental compliance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Jean-Léon Gérôme is by all accounts the poster boy of Orientalism. During the second half of the 19th century, the French painter found critical and commercial success with his meticulously detailed, exquisitely decorated scenes of the near East, most notably Turkey and Egypt. He appealed to popular hunger for what was then typically called "ethnographic" images: scientific-seeming studies of a foreign culture's lifestyle, costumes and more. His works were not just exhibited widely but reproduced shamelessly, the form of collectible etchings, lithographs and photographs, large and small.
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OPINION
January 16, 2006
Re " ... and so what if you are?" Opinion, Jan. 12 Jonah Goldberg pooh-poohs the "slippery slope" concerns of unfettered executive power. Here's the point that Goldberg and his ilk fail or refuse to see: When the president acts with Congress' authority, his powers are at a maximum. When he acts contrary to Congress' will, his powers are at their lowest ebb. This jeopardizes "the equilibrium [of] our constitutional system," as Justice Robert Jackson pointed out in the steel seizure case of 1952 (and affirmed by Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. at his hearings)
SPORTS
May 29, 2009 | Lisa Dillman
So, what exactly does $50,000 buy these days? "A Prius," said the green-minded Kobe Bryant, smiling. One Denver player apparently thought it was enough to secure a playoff game. As in Game 5 of the Western Conference finals between the Lakers and Nuggets. One quick thought: That's all? Then again, the economy is hitting everyone hard these days.
SPORTS
March 7, 1992
Is it time for the San Diego Padres again, and all of you poor players who will prove to be overpaid again. A few preseason comments: --To Randy Myers, who apparently won't talk to the media. You won't earn what they're paying you. --To Benito Santiago, prove you are worth the millions you claim to be worth. --To Andy Benes, do yourself a favor and tell 'em to get lost after the season. --To Fred McGriff, the best to you. --To Tony Gwynn, too bad there are not more people like you in this world.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | Dave Wilson
"Count the days. Count the minutes. Count on being blown away," screamed Apple Computer Inc.'s Web site in the days leading up to the Macworld Expo in San Francisco this week. Given Apple's history of downplaying its announcements, people got pretty jazzed. Typically, Apple pooh-poohs all the rumors that circulate leading up the show. Then Steve Jobs rambles for an hour or so on opening day. Toward the end of the presentation, he says, "Oh, just one more thing," and whips out something extraordinary, like a computer that you run with a mouse instead of typing arcane commands on a keyboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
U.S. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher has displayed a true politician's knack for half-truths and twisted facts in his attack on proponents of a Great Park at El Toro (Commentary, June 4). First, he derides critics of the airport's safety as "environmental extremists," but it takes a very odd point of view for anyone to consider the airline pilots' association and the FAA as either "environmentalists" or "extremists." All of those organizations have expressed doubts about the safety of the county's plan.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
Walt Disney Co. on Monday dismissed as "trivial" a lawsuit challenging the huge severance paid to Michael Ovitz, the former talent agent unable to define a role as No. 2 to Disney Chairman Michael Eisner. The suit, filed Friday in state court in Los Angeles, said Ovitz's 14-month tenure as Disney president was "undistinguished and unproductive."
WORLD
August 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Beatles material reportedly bought for $35 last month by a British tourist at an Australian flea market is not rare memorabilia, a Beatles expert said. London's Times newspaper had reported that a suitcase bought by Fraser Claughton, 41, was packed with Beatles photos, concert programs and unreleased recordings. But Pete Nash, a memorabilia expert who examined the contents, said he saw photocopied ticket stubs, laser-scanned pictures from the 1990s -- and no rare recordings.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | ANN BROCKLEHURST, Reuters
A Canadian town that claims to be the birthplace of Winnie the Pooh wants to erect a giant statue of the famous bear, but Walt Disney studios will not permit it. "Winnie the Pooh is a Canadian," said Tom Bagdon, president of the Chamber of Commerce in White River, Ontario, about 50 miles north of Lake Superior. "We don't understand why Disney gave us such an abrupt answer. We feel they have a movie and a half here in the true story of Winnie." Born Near White River Bagdon explained in a telephone interview that the bear on whom British writer A. A. Milne based his children's stories and whose copyright Walt Disney Co. now holds was born near White River in 1914.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2007 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
Two days before the sixth anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, President Bush's domestic security advisor dismissed Al Qaeda mastermind Osama bin Laden as "virtually impotent." Frances F. Townsend said a video statement from a curiously dark-bearded Bin Laden -- released Thursday -- was genuine and made recently, but she described it as little more than a propaganda device. In the video, Bin Laden compares the Iraq war to Vietnam and praises the actions of the 19 Sept.
OPINION
January 16, 2006
Re " ... and so what if you are?" Opinion, Jan. 12 Jonah Goldberg pooh-poohs the "slippery slope" concerns of unfettered executive power. Here's the point that Goldberg and his ilk fail or refuse to see: When the president acts with Congress' authority, his powers are at a maximum. When he acts contrary to Congress' will, his powers are at their lowest ebb. This jeopardizes "the equilibrium [of] our constitutional system," as Justice Robert Jackson pointed out in the steel seizure case of 1952 (and affirmed by Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. at his hearings)
WORLD
August 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Beatles material reportedly bought for $35 last month by a British tourist at an Australian flea market is not rare memorabilia, a Beatles expert said. London's Times newspaper had reported that a suitcase bought by Fraser Claughton, 41, was packed with Beatles photos, concert programs and unreleased recordings. But Pete Nash, a memorabilia expert who examined the contents, said he saw photocopied ticket stubs, laser-scanned pictures from the 1990s -- and no rare recordings.
OPINION
April 2, 2004
Re "Disney the Winner in a Hunny of a Lawsuit," March 30: Winnie the Pooh lovingly refers to himself as a "bear of little brain." I might say the same about the brain size of everyone involved with this drawn-out lawsuit characterized by lying, greed, trash-digging and a honey of a pot of money wasted on lawyers. Pooh, however, unlike the parties on both sides of the case trying to capitalize on his name, has a big heart. His endearing nature is why, even if the Walt Disney Co. and the Slesinger family continue to battle over Pooh profits, one thing will stay the same.
FOOD
January 7, 2004 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
Where are the time machines when we need them? An obnoxious affectation is catching on. Worldly Californians are wont to confess a preference for French wines, particularly the reds. California wines, they protest, why they're, they're, they're -- too big. So true. And our sky is too blue. Seriously, these snobs have a point. French wines are certainly preferable to California ones -- in France. But in California, only an ingrate would despise the local big reds.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | Dave Wilson
"Count the days. Count the minutes. Count on being blown away," screamed Apple Computer Inc.'s Web site in the days leading up to the Macworld Expo in San Francisco this week. Given Apple's history of downplaying its announcements, people got pretty jazzed. Typically, Apple pooh-poohs all the rumors that circulate leading up the show. Then Steve Jobs rambles for an hour or so on opening day. Toward the end of the presentation, he says, "Oh, just one more thing," and whips out something extraordinary, like a computer that you run with a mouse instead of typing arcane commands on a keyboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1990 | ANTHONY PERRY
Call it the Rodney Dangerfield complex. Genre paperbacks--Westerns, action-adventures, romances, etc.--outsell the more literary stuff by a mile. But they don't get the respect given to their hardback cousins; no reviews in the Sunday newspaper, no book tours, no admiring interviews on "SunUp San Diego." Chet Cunningham, 61, a former newspaperman who lives in San Carlos, thinks that's wrongheaded and snobbish.
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
Just when you think you've had it to here with fashion, that you're going to the Gap and you're never coming back, along comes something like Romeo Gigli's fall collection. The most visually stunning event of the season, it was a sort of astral fantasy beamed into the rotunda of the Paris stock exchange. Everything seemed to be scraped from sparkling rocks, powders and dusts that Gigli had gathered on the moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
U.S. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher has displayed a true politician's knack for half-truths and twisted facts in his attack on proponents of a Great Park at El Toro (Commentary, June 4). First, he derides critics of the airport's safety as "environmental extremists," but it takes a very odd point of view for anyone to consider the airline pilots' association and the FAA as either "environmentalists" or "extremists." All of those organizations have expressed doubts about the safety of the county's plan.
NEWS
April 2, 2000 | MATT CRENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider begins operating in May, it will re-create conditions that have not existed since the dawn of the universe. Could that mean the end of the world? Last year a British newspaper charged that the new physics experiment on Long Island might somehow generate a black hole that would swallow the planet, or perhaps turn all of creation into some kind of deadly "strange matter."
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