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Pop Art

ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1997 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The task of teaching children the artistic value of a gigantic cushion cheeseburger, a portrait of Mickey Mouse or a gaggle of hanging yellow rubber duckies is daunting at best. But the Children's Museum of San Diego has risen to the challenge with an exhibition exploring the recurrent themes and iconography of 1950s and 1960s Pop Art titled "POP! Goes the Museum/En El Museo."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
"My art is not pop art," Takashi Murakami once said, correcting an interviewer. "It is a record of the struggle of the discriminated people." The Tokyo native's artwork graces the kinetic cover of Kanye West's new album, the top-selling "Graduation," which, come to think of it, also shakes and bakes social themes in its crowd-pleasing rhythms. Murakami, 36, who has a hotly anticipated show at MOCA opening Oct. 29, is a subversive hero in museums and malls everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
If a great artist loves and is inspired by some really bad paintings by another artist, are we obliged to find a way to embrace them too? No, of course not. But we would do well to consider the really bad paintings, if only in service to a fuller understanding of the great artist's work. This peculiar circumstance is central to "Enigma Variations: Philip Guston and Giorgio de Chirico," a quirky, modest yet thoughtful new exhibition at the Santa Monica Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High name-recognition value certainly accompanies the show of early graphic work by the late Andy Warhol, which opens Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. For an art that grew from advertising, it's only fitting. Still, Pop art of the 1960s remains among the most widely misunderstood artistic movements of the 20th Century. It certainly has enjoyed crowd-pleasing notoriety almost from the very start.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1994 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Is it possible for an artist to begin a career in a determined anti-art mode, which spits out absurdist and confrontational gestures against the failures of bourgeois society, and then to switch successfully into a form that is steeped in conservative tradition? That question is at the heart of "Gronk! A Living Survey, 1973-1993," a smallish exhibition that opened Thursday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Nelson Copley, the witty and irreverent painter and collector of surrealist art who once painted Betsy Ross stripping in front of her design of the American flag and titled it "O Say Can You Sew," has died. He was 77. Copley, who signed his work "Cply," died Tuesday at his home in Sugar Loaf Key, Fla., of complications from a stroke. He had retired to Florida about five years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Jessica Hundley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was a year ago, late on a June gloom Venice afternoon, when I last sat down with Dennis Hopper. We had been working for over 18 months on a publication of his photographs for Taschen Books. It was our last meeting before the book went to print and he was reading, with a mix of curiosity and bemusement, a biography I had written for the publication. It is not an easy thing to sit beside an icon and watch him read a summation that you've written of his entire existence. But Dennis, thankfully, had a sense of humor — particularly about himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Tim Ebner formerly made 2-by-2-foot house paint color chip panels fitted with Velcro backs for easy rearrangement into suit-the-decor, do-it-yourself grids. They were a conceptualist post-mortem on originality and painting as we traditionally define it. The same ideological current runs through his recent, pristinely elegant "paintings" made from vertical arrangements of brightly colored fiberglass bands. Each work is composed of separate stripes of glossy plastic.
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