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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Jessica Hundley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was a year ago, late on a June gloom Venice afternoon, when I last sat down with Dennis Hopper. We had been working for over 18 months on a publication of his photographs for Taschen Books. It was our last meeting before the book went to print and he was reading, with a mix of curiosity and bemusement, a biography I had written for the publication. It is not an easy thing to sit beside an icon and watch him read a summation that you've written of his entire existence. But Dennis, thankfully, had a sense of humor — particularly about himself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1997 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The task of teaching children the artistic value of a gigantic cushion cheeseburger, a portrait of Mickey Mouse or a gaggle of hanging yellow rubber duckies is daunting at best. But the Children's Museum of San Diego has risen to the challenge with an exhibition exploring the recurrent themes and iconography of 1950s and 1960s Pop Art titled "POP! Goes the Museum / En el Museo."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2003 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Bruce D. Kurtz, an influential art critic and curator who explored the complex intersection of high art and popular culture and was an early champion of video art, died Saturday in Phoenix of complications from AIDS. He was 59. Kurtz had been an outspoken activist in the fight against the disease. In 1990, he founded a Phoenix chapter of the organization ACT UP.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
"My art is not pop art," Takashi Murakami once said, correcting an interviewer. "It is a record of the struggle of the discriminated people." The Tokyo native's artwork graces the kinetic cover of Kanye West's new album, the top-selling "Graduation," which, come to think of it, also shakes and bakes social themes in its crowd-pleasing rhythms. Murakami, 36, who has a hotly anticipated show at MOCA opening Oct. 29, is a subversive hero in museums and malls everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Muchnic is a Times staff writer.
When Wendy Kaplan became curator of decorative arts at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art seven years ago, she knew that part of her job was to work with Max Palevsky. Museum staff members routinely advise and assist potential art donors, but Palevsky was a special case -- a major supporter who was building a collection of Arts and Crafts furniture and decorative arts for LACMA.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES SENIOR FASHION WRITER
When Dennis Hopper started taking pictures with his first camera in 1962, he was a struggling actor who had yet to make "Easy Rider" and become synonymous with the rebel culture of the 1960s. But with that $351 Nikon, a gift from his new wife, Brooke Hayward, he not only chronicled his personal life, but also captured the ascent of Hollywood's '60s generation and Pop Art's first.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High name-recognition value certainly accompanies the show of early graphic work by the late Andy Warhol, which opens Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. For an art that grew from advertising, it's only fitting. Still, Pop art of the 1960s remains among the most widely misunderstood artistic movements of the 20th Century. It certainly has enjoyed crowd-pleasing notoriety almost from the very start.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1994 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Is it possible for an artist to begin a career in a determined anti-art mode, which spits out absurdist and confrontational gestures against the failures of bourgeois society, and then to switch successfully into a form that is steeped in conservative tradition? That question is at the heart of "Gronk! A Living Survey, 1973-1993," a smallish exhibition that opened Thursday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Nelson Copley, the witty and irreverent painter and collector of surrealist art who once painted Betsy Ross stripping in front of her design of the American flag and titled it "O Say Can You Sew," has died. He was 77. Copley, who signed his work "Cply," died Tuesday at his home in Sugar Loaf Key, Fla., of complications from a stroke. He had retired to Florida about five years ago.
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