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Pop Art

ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2003 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
With his deliriously lush paintings of the delectable delights available over the bakery counter, Wayne Thiebaud has produced some of the most instantly recognizable works in contemporary American art. His best-known paintings are elegies to cakes, pies, eclairs and doughnuts -- all neatly displayed and slathered with colorful icing so thick that viewers can almost taste the burst of sugar when looking at them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1995 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Sotheby's auction house will sell about 100 artworks from the estate of Betty Asher, a Los Angeles-based collector, curator and dealer whose eye for contemporary art and cultural patronage helped to develop the local art scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1997 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The task of teaching children the artistic value of a gigantic cushion cheeseburger, a portrait of Mickey Mouse or a gaggle of hanging yellow rubber duckies is daunting at best. But the Children's Museum of San Diego has risen to the challenge with an exhibition exploring the recurrent themes and iconography of 1950s and 1960s Pop Art titled "POP! Goes the Museum / En el Museo."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2008 | Matt Schudel, Schudel writes for the Washington Post, where this obituary first appeared.
Grace Hartigan, an Abstract Expressionist painter once hailed as the leading female artist of her generation who later turned to teaching and led a Baltimore art school to national prominence, died Nov. 15 of liver failure at a nursing home in Timonium, Md. She was 86. Hartigan was a brash, self-taught artist who began painting in the late 1940s when the Abstract Expressionist movement, led by Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, was reaching its height.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
"My art is not pop art," Takashi Murakami once said, correcting an interviewer. "It is a record of the struggle of the discriminated people." The Tokyo native's artwork graces the kinetic cover of Kanye West's new album, the top-selling "Graduation," which, come to think of it, also shakes and bakes social themes in its crowd-pleasing rhythms. Murakami, 36, who has a hotly anticipated show at MOCA opening Oct. 29, is a subversive hero in museums and malls everywhere.
NEWS
June 17, 1993
For some unknown reason, architect Frank Gehry has been put on a postmodern pedestal in this town and worshiped as the prince of innovation. More appropriately, he should be made to stand on one of his ungodly chain-link fences so he can experience, firsthand, their lack of integrity and function. Aaron Betsky, in his critique of Santa Monica Place (Times, June 3), praises Gehry's chain-link-wrapped parking garage as "the most beautiful" such facade in Southern California. The fact that the structure visually cuts the city in half, isolating City Hall from its downtown arteries and northern residential heritage, and was the main contributing factor to the demise of the original Third Street mall, was probably never a consideration in Mr. Gehry's planning.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High name-recognition value certainly accompanies the show of early graphic work by the late Andy Warhol, which opens Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. For an art that grew from advertising, it's only fitting. Still, Pop art of the 1960s remains among the most widely misunderstood artistic movements of the 20th Century. It certainly has enjoyed crowd-pleasing notoriety almost from the very start.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Nelson Copley, the witty and irreverent painter and collector of surrealist art who once painted Betsy Ross stripping in front of her design of the American flag and titled it "O Say Can You Sew," has died. He was 77. Copley, who signed his work "Cply," died Tuesday at his home in Sugar Loaf Key, Fla., of complications from a stroke. He had retired to Florida about five years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Tim Ebner formerly made 2-by-2-foot house paint color chip panels fitted with Velcro backs for easy rearrangement into suit-the-decor, do-it-yourself grids. They were a conceptualist post-mortem on originality and painting as we traditionally define it. The same ideological current runs through his recent, pristinely elegant "paintings" made from vertical arrangements of brightly colored fiberglass bands. Each work is composed of separate stripes of glossy plastic.
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