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Pop Art

ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1995 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Sotheby's auction house will sell about 100 artworks from the estate of Betty Asher, a Los Angeles-based collector, curator and dealer whose eye for contemporary art and cultural patronage helped to develop the local art scene.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1997 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The task of teaching children the artistic value of a gigantic cushion cheeseburger, a portrait of Mickey Mouse or a gaggle of hanging yellow rubber duckies is daunting at best. But the Children's Museum of San Diego has risen to the challenge with an exhibition exploring the recurrent themes and iconography of 1950s and 1960s Pop Art titled "POP! Goes the Museum / En el Museo."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
"My art is not pop art," Takashi Murakami once said, correcting an interviewer. "It is a record of the struggle of the discriminated people." The Tokyo native's artwork graces the kinetic cover of Kanye West's new album, the top-selling "Graduation," which, come to think of it, also shakes and bakes social themes in its crowd-pleasing rhythms. Murakami, 36, who has a hotly anticipated show at MOCA opening Oct. 29, is a subversive hero in museums and malls everywhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Pop artist Tom Wesselmann, known for his large-scale paintings that mix elements of fine art and advertising and for his compositions in which classically posed nudes vie for attention with household appliances and product labels, has died. He was 73. A longtime resident of New York City, Wesselmann died Friday at New York University Medical Center after complications from heart surgery, according to Emilio Steinberger of the Robert Miller Gallery, where Wesselmann recently exhibited his work.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES SENIOR FASHION WRITER
When Dennis Hopper started taking pictures with his first camera in 1962, he was a struggling actor who had yet to make "Easy Rider" and become synonymous with the rebel culture of the 1960s. But with that $351 Nikon, a gift from his new wife, Brooke Hayward, he not only chronicled his personal life, but also captured the ascent of Hollywood's '60s generation and Pop Art's first.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High name-recognition value certainly accompanies the show of early graphic work by the late Andy Warhol, which opens Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. For an art that grew from advertising, it's only fitting. Still, Pop art of the 1960s remains among the most widely misunderstood artistic movements of the 20th Century. It certainly has enjoyed crowd-pleasing notoriety almost from the very start.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Keith Haring, recipient Friday of a Google Doodle , was among a group of art school students who considered themselves Pop Art heirs to Andy Warhol. But although Haring was dead by age 31, the artist made his own imprint, and it wasn't on a soup can. Perhaps as remarkable as Haring's art was the man himself -- his energy and personality. In a 2008 review of a Haring documentary, Los Angeles Times' movie critic Kenneth Turan says Haring's lively pop sensibility, "owlish looks" and exuberant personality combined to make him, as one of his friends said, "a true phenomenon.
BOOKS
August 22, 1993
Out of his corner, windmilling and punching up a storm, comes the poet, critic and gadfly of the art scene, John Yau. He is addressing the 30-year Andy Warhol phenomenon, in decline, perhaps, since a depressed art market and the inevitable leakage of hype out of a posthumous balloon cut the $600 million valuation of his estate by some two-thirds. More generally, Yau's collection of epigrams, apothegms and plain insults buzzes around the wider phenomenon of pop art and post-modernism.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Nelson Copley, the witty and irreverent painter and collector of surrealist art who once painted Betsy Ross stripping in front of her design of the American flag and titled it "O Say Can You Sew," has died. He was 77. Copley, who signed his work "Cply," died Tuesday at his home in Sugar Loaf Key, Fla., of complications from a stroke. He had retired to Florida about five years ago.
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