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Pop Art

ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
"My art is not pop art," Takashi Murakami once said, correcting an interviewer. "It is a record of the struggle of the discriminated people." The Tokyo native's artwork graces the kinetic cover of Kanye West's new album, the top-selling "Graduation," which, come to think of it, also shakes and bakes social themes in its crowd-pleasing rhythms. Murakami, 36, who has a hotly anticipated show at MOCA opening Oct. 29, is a subversive hero in museums and malls everywhere.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Muchnic is a Times staff writer.
When Wendy Kaplan became curator of decorative arts at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art seven years ago, she knew that part of her job was to work with Max Palevsky. Museum staff members routinely advise and assist potential art donors, but Palevsky was a special case -- a major supporter who was building a collection of Arts and Crafts furniture and decorative arts for LACMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High name-recognition value certainly accompanies the show of early graphic work by the late Andy Warhol, which opens Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. For an art that grew from advertising, it's only fitting. Still, Pop art of the 1960s remains among the most widely misunderstood artistic movements of the 20th Century. It certainly has enjoyed crowd-pleasing notoriety almost from the very start.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Nelson Copley, the witty and irreverent painter and collector of surrealist art who once painted Betsy Ross stripping in front of her design of the American flag and titled it "O Say Can You Sew," has died. He was 77. Copley, who signed his work "Cply," died Tuesday at his home in Sugar Loaf Key, Fla., of complications from a stroke. He had retired to Florida about five years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Joe Sam attempts to correct history books with his "The Black West Series," which makes the point that not every black American of the 19th Century could be found south of the Mason-Dixon line polishing Miss Scarlett's silver. Unbeknownst to the movie industry (which has done more than its share to foster misconceptions regarding world history), there were black cowpokes, rustlers, prospectors and rodeo stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Tim Ebner formerly made 2-by-2-foot house paint color chip panels fitted with Velcro backs for easy rearrangement into suit-the-decor, do-it-yourself grids. They were a conceptualist post-mortem on originality and painting as we traditionally define it. The same ideological current runs through his recent, pristinely elegant "paintings" made from vertical arrangements of brightly colored fiberglass bands. Each work is composed of separate stripes of glossy plastic.
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