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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2003 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Bruce D. Kurtz, an influential art critic and curator who explored the complex intersection of high art and popular culture and was an early champion of video art, died Saturday in Phoenix of complications from AIDS. He was 59. Kurtz had been an outspoken activist in the fight against the disease. In 1990, he founded a Phoenix chapter of the organization ACT UP.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1986 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Joe Goode does not deny the psychological impact on the viewer of the shotgun blasts that have peppered some of his canvases. Violence, though, was not the point. The purpose of the pellet holes was to expose layers of painted-on colors, enabling the viewer to sense bits of color, an effect much like perceiving the color of grass in the background when looking at a tree. The shotgun was only a device that came to hand, the way an apple or a brush stroke is a device.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By David Pagel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Over the last 40 years, William Leavitt has made a name for himself as an influential artist while staying so far out of fame's spotlight that his hard-to-categorize works have been all but invisible to the public. That's not how it works in Hollywood, where fame and fortune go hand in glove. Nor is it how it often goes in the art world, which has become so infatuated with market-savvy celebrity that making a name for oneself has become an art unto itself ? and not a particularly interesting one. But Leavitt is a misfit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2008 | Matt Schudel, Schudel writes for the Washington Post, where this obituary first appeared.
Grace Hartigan, an Abstract Expressionist painter once hailed as the leading female artist of her generation who later turned to teaching and led a Baltimore art school to national prominence, died Nov. 15 of liver failure at a nursing home in Timonium, Md. She was 86. Hartigan was a brash, self-taught artist who began painting in the late 1940s when the Abstract Expressionist movement, led by Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, was reaching its height.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
"My art is not pop art," Takashi Murakami once said, correcting an interviewer. "It is a record of the struggle of the discriminated people." The Tokyo native's artwork graces the kinetic cover of Kanye West's new album, the top-selling "Graduation," which, come to think of it, also shakes and bakes social themes in its crowd-pleasing rhythms. Murakami, 36, who has a hotly anticipated show at MOCA opening Oct. 29, is a subversive hero in museums and malls everywhere.
NEWS
June 17, 1993
For some unknown reason, architect Frank Gehry has been put on a postmodern pedestal in this town and worshiped as the prince of innovation. More appropriately, he should be made to stand on one of his ungodly chain-link fences so he can experience, firsthand, their lack of integrity and function. Aaron Betsky, in his critique of Santa Monica Place (Times, June 3), praises Gehry's chain-link-wrapped parking garage as "the most beautiful" such facade in Southern California. The fact that the structure visually cuts the city in half, isolating City Hall from its downtown arteries and northern residential heritage, and was the main contributing factor to the demise of the original Third Street mall, was probably never a consideration in Mr. Gehry's planning.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What with "Dances With Wolves" fresh in everybody's mind and headed for an Oscar roundup, there's been a chic re-evaluation of the American West mythology. Cowboys and Indians--who's on the side of right? Was John Wayne all wrong? Is Kevin Costner alright? Questions burn and white guilt rears its head.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High name-recognition value certainly accompanies the show of early graphic work by the late Andy Warhol, which opens Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. For an art that grew from advertising, it's only fitting. Still, Pop art of the 1960s remains among the most widely misunderstood artistic movements of the 20th Century. It certainly has enjoyed crowd-pleasing notoriety almost from the very start.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
THE question was innocent enough. "What's going on with contemporary art these days?" My answer was equally candid. "Beats me." I do spend a sizable chunk of my time looking at, reading about and thinking over new art in Los Angeles and elsewhere, but the days when a succinct response might quickly sum up the art scene are long gone. Partly that's because contemporary art has gone global.
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