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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Press the plastic clown head and it dispenses those 29-cent candies that a generation of children eagerly gulped down. Press the self-styled Pezhead and she dispenses all of the reasons baby boomers don't gulp at all over spending hundreds of dollars years later for that same Pez candy dispenser. "They remind you of your childhood," said Linda Adams, a 48-year-old San Jose software company administrator. "They're so cute and colorful and innocent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Press the plastic clown head and it dispenses those 29-cent candies that a generation of children eagerly gulped down. Press the self-styled Pezhead and she dispenses all of the reasons baby boomers don't gulp at all over spending hundreds of dollars years later for that same Pez candy dispenser. "They remind you of your childhood," said Linda Adams, a 48-year-old San Jose software company administrator. "They're so cute and colorful and innocent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
Actor Ron Palillo, who died early Tuesday morning of a heart attack at age 63, will be remembered by a generation of Americans as Arnold Horshack, the whiny-voiced lovable loser he played on the hit ABC sitcom, “Welcome Back, Kotter,”  from 1975 to 1979. Although Horshack was not a star student, he was undeniably a nerd. With his gawky frame, distinctive hyena-like laugh, and habit of exclaiming “oooh, ooooh, oooh” while insistently raising his hand in class, Horshack ranks alongside Screech, Urkel and Sheldon Cooper as one of the most beloved geeks in pop culture history.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999
As Robert Hilburn strains to find some mythic connection between the legacies of Bob Dylan and Paul Simon to justify their joint shows ("They Are a Rock," June 20), he completely sidesteps the obvious that these two boomer icons stand to sell more tickets touring together than separately. He also indulges in some loopy revisionist pop culture history along the way. For instance, I'd love to hear Joni Mitchell's response (or Van Morrison's, for that matter) to his assertion that of all Dylan's touring partners, only Simon's oeuvre is of equal stature.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2009 | Susan King
Rock 'n' roll is in the air this weekend as the American Cinematheque screens a Frank Zappa double feature: 1971's "200 Motels " and 1979's " Baby Snakes" tonight at the Aero Theatre. And on Friday the Aero will show a new 35-millimeter print of director Michael Wadleigh's cut of his 1970 Oscar-winning "Woodstock ," with an introduction by Hal Lifson, pop culture historian and author of "1966! The Coolest Year in Pop Culture History." www.americancinematheque.com 'Night Flight' salute Meanwhile, the Don't Knock the Rock 2009 festival winds up tonight at the Silent Movie Theatre with a tribute to "Night Flight," the seminal late-night show from 1981 that included music videos, short films, cartoons, interviews, concerts and cult movies.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Jay Jones
Movie buffs and motorcycle fans can conjure memories of a 1991 Hollywood blockbuster -- starring California's former governor -- at a new exhibition at a Milwaukee museum. “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” is the name of  both the film and the display that opens Thursday at the Harley-Davidson Museum . At its core is a time-worn Fat Boy Harley ridden throughout the movie by actor and later California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. The film also starred Linda Hamilton as Sarah Connor in the story about a cyborg (Schwarzenegger)
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
First published on Oct. 30, 2011. Revised and expanded in early 2012. Set an out-of-towner loose to roam the Los Angeles area between West Hollywood and Koreatown, and what can you expect? A food-truck overdose, perhaps. Or the bold suggestion that we extend our subway system westward. (Hey, we're working on it.) Or maybe just your basic Asian-Russian-Latino-gay-vegetarian-barbecue-automotive-modernist-tar-pit-chili-dog weekend. In other words, it's a trip worth taking, and a great way to catch the city in the act of reinventing itself, from the Japanese department store that's now a car museum to the Jewish avenue that's now a skateboarder haven.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2001
In Roger Catlin's "A Rock-Solid Case for 1966" (Aug. 3), he makes the assertion that this was the most influential and creatively dominant year in rock music history. I couldn't agree more, and would like to take this a step further, by proclaiming 1966 as the most significant and creative year in pop culture history! On TV, we were introduced to "Batman," "Star Trek" and "The Monkees," all of which became national phenomena, lasting in popularity more than 35 years now. (Let's not forget "The Green Hornet," which marked Bruce Lee's entrance to pop culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
In 1969, Jay Silverheels, the Mohawk Indian actor who played Tonto in the hit 1950s TV show "The Lone Ranger," appeared in character on "The Tonight Show," where Johnny Carson conducted a mock job interview. "Worked 30 years as faithful sidekick for kemo sabe," Tonto said, explaining his employment history. "Hunt, fish, make food, sew clothes, sweep up, stay awake all night to listen for enemies for kemo sabe. Risk life for kemo sabe. Thirty lousy years. " The joke - considering, for once, how the Lone Ranger's Wild West adventures might have felt from his subservient partner's point of view - drew some laughs from Carson's Civil Rights-era, in-studio audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2011 | Susan King
The iconic musical number that serves as a prologue and epilogue to the 1963 musical comedy "Bye Bye Birdie" was something of an afterthought. Six months after principal photography ended on the musical, director George Sidney brought the film's young star Ann-Margret back to Columbia Pictures to shoot the new musical number, "Bye Bye Birdie. " And the rest is pop culture history. Placed on a treadmill with a fan hitting her red tresses, Ann-Margret was shot against a vibrant blue background.
NEWS
December 12, 1999
They were made by Americans for Americans, and virtually anyone who was a child in this country during the era that spanned the Great Depression and the Vietnam War will have a memory of them: toy ray guns. And, as often happens with items that become icons of popular culture, they were created to promote something: in this case, the star of a comic strip and radio show (and later television and movies) called Buck Rogers and his subsequent competition, Flash Gordon.
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