Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPop Hiss
IN THE NEWS

Pop Hiss

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
Last week Rick Ross revealed " 100 Black Coffins ," his typically imposing contribution to the upcoming soundtrack to Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained. " The album, due out Dec. 18, is the first of Tarantino's soundtracks to feature original songs he commissioned, and today Pop & Hiss brings you an exclusive premiere of another of those tunes: "Who Did That to You?" by John Legend. Co-written and produced by Paul Epworth (of " Rolling in the Deep " fame), "Who Did That to You" presents a grittier sound than we're accustomed to hearing from this smooth-voiced soul star; it finds Legend insisting he's "not afraid to do the Lord's work" over an organ-fueled garage-soul groove.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
A day after stealthily dropping her latest album, Beyoncé has risen to the top spot on iTunes in the U.S. -- and pretty much everywhere else. As much of the country was tucking into bed Thursday night, the singer suddenly announced that her new album was suddenly available for purchase on Apple's storefront. The album, currently available as an iTunes exclusive, features 14 new tracks and 17 accompanying music videos that saw a staggering 80,000 downloads in just three hours after its release.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Last week, Pop & Hiss wrote about a report in the Mexico City daily newspaper El Universal that the hit-making Mexican sibling pop duo Jesse y Joy were going their separate ways. According to El Universal, Jesse harbored dreams of a professional soccer career, while Joy was going to dedicate herself to making documentaries about animals. But it turns out that the story was a prank, according to a publicist for the brother-sister artists. According to the publicist, El Universal's satirical story was part of a Latin American tradition (a la April Fool's Day)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Chris Lee
For airplane-phobic drummer Travis Barker, the gig required a quick trip across town in a pimped-out low rider. Singer-bassist Mark Hoppus flew 5,400 miles from London. And with sky's-the-limit rock-star gusto, guitarist-vocalist Tom DeLonge bypassed traffic on the 405 and helicoptered in from San Diego. With the sun high in the autumn sky, SoCal's Blink-182 arrived at the Hollywood Palladium to find a punk-rock centipede, a line of heavily tattooed, extravagantly pierced and Mohawk-sporting fans waiting for the sold-out show.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
No band from the nascent Los Angeles punk rock scene of the 1970s and '80s has meant more to subsequent hard-core generations than Black Flag. Few could have expected as much at the time. "I'm totally surprised because we didn't know what we were doing," recalls Keith Morris, the band's founding singer, who quit in 1979 to form his own early hard-core act, the Circle Jerks. "This is who we are, this is what we do: get in the room, turn the amps on and let it blast. " Since the band's breakup in 1986, fans and the curious have had to be content with all the "loudfastrules" recordings left behind, but this summer brings a strange new chapter: two competing versions of the band on tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery
Strutting the stage in her white tuxedo jacket, shorts and sparkling top hat, Taylor Swift opened Sunday's Grammy Awards with a live performance of her current hit, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together. " Inside Staples Center, the singer's performance earned loud applause. But to the Twitterverse watching at home, the pop and country superstar sang a little bit flat. Swift was dancing in the footsteps of countless artists who have performed live at music's biggest night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
You couldn't have asked for a more sweetly engaging debut than the Living Sisters ' 2010 album, “Love to Live,” a title that embodied the sheer joy the three original members -- Inara George, Eleni Mandell and Becky Stark -- displayed through the blending of their voices. Thankfully, that recording wasn't just a one-off side project for the three women, who are otherwise engaged in various indie rock and pop projects around L.A. Now, the trio becomes a quartet with the addition of Alex Lilly, the onetime backup singer for George in the Bird and the Bee who subsequently stepped into the lead spot when she formed Obi Best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
The year of Phoenix has begun. After announcing last week that it would release a new album in April, the French band on Monday posted the disc's first song, "Entertainment," on YouTube. It's a speedy electro-rock jam built around the group's signature live-disco guitar, as well as a giant-sized synth hook that after a few spins is reminding Pop & Hiss of some of the rave-ier moments from Coldplay's "Mylo Xyloto. " (Listen to "Entertainment" below.) Due out in the U.S. on April 23, "Bankrupt!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Christian Zucconi was nobody's idea of a Hollywood slickster when he ambled onstage one night last month at Club Nokia. Gawky, wild-haired and wrapped in what appeared to be a secondhand bathrobe, the frontman of L.A.'s Grouplove was there to perform with his band as part of a benefit for the Grammy Foundation. In the audience, well-dressed guys and women teetering on high heels listened attentively enough as Zucconi sang about losing his head over Andrew Wessen's clanging guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The creation story behind "Astro-Mancy," MGMT's rhythmic freakout on its self-titled new album, is instructive when considering the duo's oblong output over the years. A band best known for its string of genre-defying dance-pop hits of 2008, "Time to Pretend," "Kids" and "Electric Feel," MGMT has since its rise succeeded in upending expectations - sometimes in mystifying ways. Despite the whirling rhythms and psychedelic electronic noise rolling within, "Astro-Mancy" was born of a failed attempt to rein it in a bit. Which perhaps makes sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Charles Lloyd was recounting his early days as a musician and the wisdom imparted to him by the late trumpeter Booker Little when he abruptly apologized for drifting off topic. "Pardon me for telling you this story," he said, speaking by phone from his house in the hills above Santa Barbara. "I live in the wilderness, and I don't edit so well. " No apology necessary. The saxophonist, 75, has a built a career on rewarding tangents, building a body of work that's helped shape the sound of jazz from the '60s into the new millennium.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By August Brown
At a New York release party for her new album "Matangi," M.I.A. brought a special guest onstage - WikiLeaks' Julian Assange. He Skyped an introduction to the show from his longtime temporary home inside the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. The gesture was meant to shore up her radical bona-fides and continue her work at the edges of politics, technology, performance art and music. The move might have made a little more sense for her last album, the frantic and Internet-paranoia-laced "Maya.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Lorraine Ali
He helped get rap on MTV, hip-hop fashions into Macy's and multiracial stand-up comedy into a series on HBO. Entrepreneur and philanthropist Russell Simmons has spent decades pushing the marginalized into the mainstream, and Saturday he'll be honored in a ceremony at USC by the Muslim Public Affairs Council for his support of Muslim artists (Mos Def, Dave Chappelle among them). The recent L.A. transplant spoke with Pop & Hiss about comedy, Kanye and yoga. What's happening with your YouTube channel, All Def Digital?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
When Sky Ferreira turned up recently at an Echo Park watering hole to talk about her debut album, the singer's seen-it-all manner - joyless expression, slumped shoulders, eyes hidden behind dark sunglasses - hardly communicated the giddy excitement of an artist on her way up. But it wasn't entirely unexpected of someone who's been through what Ferreira has. In 2007, when she was 15, the Los Angeles native signed a major-label record deal after developing...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
"Am I dessert?" Neil Young wryly asked the crowd of about 600 who attended the annual concert benefiting the Silverlake Conservatory. He followed a set by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, playing for a crowd who'd paid a minimum of $2,000 a seat to attend the event in the historic Paramour Mansion overlooking downtown Los Angeles. "I think I'm the main course, but I like being dessert. " Young, 67, served up a half-hour-plus solo acoustic set Wednesday that included several of his own cornerstone numbers as well as versions of songs by fellow folk-rockers Bob Dylan, Gordon Lightfoot and Phil Ochs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Times Pop Music Staff
The scariest part about Halloween is having to put up with hearing "Monster Mash" a thousand times in a night. If you're looking for a tasteful soundtrack that still feels like the icy breath of the reaper tonight, Pop & Hiss is here to help.  Wolf Eyes, “Stabbed in the Face” There are songs that are about evil things, and then there are songs that just are evil. The Michigan-reared noise group Wolf Eyes makes tortured electronic shrieks that could double as the soundtrack to that video-missive-from-the-pit-of-hell in “Event Horizon.” “Stabbed in the Face” was their attempt at a pop single.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Bob Dylan "Tempest" Columbia 3 stars Not to be morbid, but every time I take a day off or leave for vacation, I say a little prayer for the health of Bob Dylan. So large is his presence on generations of American music fans that when his heart strikes its final beat, encapsulating his body of work will require so much sorting and brainpower that the pressure to produce big thoughts on such a towering figure will no doubt overwhelm the Internet - and my ability to process his enormous influence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2013 | By August Brown
Kelly Clarkson, the "American Idol" winner who was one of few peers to maintain a major pop career, won the award for pop vocal album at the 55th Grammy Awards, besting a diverse roster of artists including Florence and the Machine, Fun., Maroon 5 and Pink. Clarkson won for her album “Stronger,” her fifth studio full-length, which was widely viewed as a return to form for the Texas-raised vocalist. Bolstered by popular singles, including the title track and “Mr. Know It All,” the album went platinum in America and returned her to the upper ranks of American pop stardom.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
BAKERSFIELD - Peddling the songs of Buck Owens and Merle Haggard in the heart of Bakersfield - when you're neither Owens nor Haggard - could rank on the scale of tough gigs right up there with hauling coals to Newcastle and selling ice to Eskimos. That was anything but the case, however, when 20-time Grammy Award winner Vince Gill and longtime friend steel guitarist Paul Franklin brought their new tribute album, "Bakersfield," to its namesake town to celebrate the distinctive West Coast strain of country music and its two most prominent practitioners, who emerged there more than half a century ago. It was no surprise, ultimately, that Gill and Franklin were accorded heroes' welcomes for shining the spotlight anew on a richly fertile period and place by nearly 3,000 Bakersfield residents who filed into the Rabobank Arena Theater on Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Slide shows of amateur photography aren't usually premiered at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood, but when you're a Beatle, rules are often bent. "That's one of me!" said Ringo Starr excitedly when he saw his face on the big screen Wednesday. "I like that one!" Starr, 73, was kicking off a day of media interviews pegged to the publication of his visual autobiography, "Photograph," and his forthcoming All-Starr Band tour of South America and Mexico. He offered up dozens of photos of, or by, himself and the three bandmates he refers to as "the lads" - John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|