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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Shedding for the Wedding," which premieres Wednesday on CW, or "the CW" as it wants to be called but which always seems silly to write, combines the popular weight-loss competition reality genre with the popular planning-for-the-nuptials reality genre ? a chocolate-meets-peanut-butter moment that seems both brilliantly inevitable and somewhat recycled. Although I don't have the evidence at hand, surely these topics have met somewhere before, even if just for the space of an episode of "The Jenny Jones Show" or "The Oprah Winfrey Show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997
Just one request: Would you please, in the name of God, stop calling it the "Rach 3" ("In Defense of Rach 3," by Greg Sandow, Aug. 24)? To all but the most heartless of souls, Rachmaninoff's Third Concerto is indubitably a masterwork, and the fact that its beautiful melodies lend themselves to a popular, if unsophisticated, appreciation of the piece should not detract from its merits. However, this does not mean we need to encourage people to adopt airs of breezy, unearned familiarity with the piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Baz Dreisinger
Never mind that she's more grandmother than grande dame: Sue Johanson can talk dirty with the best of them. During her weekly television show --"Talk Sex with Sue Johanson," now completing its second season on the Oxygen network -- the registered nurse and "70-ish" mother of three doles out bedroom tips with such poker-faced candor she might as well be serving up cooking counsel. Attribute her clinical frankness to three decades as a sex guru: In 1970 Johanson founded a birth control clinic at a high school in her native Toronto, and in 1984 she launched a popular Canadian radio show that was soon picked up for cable TV. Nowadays Johanson, recently appointed to the prestigious Order of Canada, talks sex on television, in bookstores and at colleges across the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2004 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
A teenage girl was found guilty Tuesday of helping two men kill popular young actor Merlin Santana, making a clean sweep for prosecutors, who earlier won convictions against her two codefendants. Monique King lied to her two accomplices by saying the actor had made sexual advances toward her; she also helped them get away after they shot Santana, said Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Larry P. Fidler.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Medical castration to treat localized prostate tumors does not prolong survival and its side effects far outweigh any potential benefit for most patients, researchers reported today. The technique, which involves using drugs to block the body's production of the male hormone androgen, is a powerful tool when used in conjunction with surgery or radiation for treating aggressive prostate tumors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2011 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
Most people can tell you exactly where they were when the bus and all those children disappeared. In the way of small towns, the connections to that dark moment are personal. Lois Rambo, who runs the lunch counter at Pioneer Market Cafe in Chowchilla, says her daughter would have been on that bus if she hadn't stayed home sick from school that day. Jodi Heffington Medrano, who owns a salon on the square, was one of the children who disappeared. Photos: Chowchilla kidnappings Even those who weren't born yet can't remember a time when they didn't know the story of the Chowchilla kidnappings.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Gwynne, a dour but lovable stage, film and television actor for four decades who was best remembered for his leading roles in the 1960s cult television series "The Munsters" and "Car 54 Where Are You?" died Friday. He was 66. Gwynne died in his home near Baltimore of pancreatic cancer, his New York legal representatives at Kraditor, Haber & Bienstock announced.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins. At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails. Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.
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