Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPopulation Control
IN THE NEWS

Population Control

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1992
In response to "Economic Growth Can't Continue but There Is No End to Development," Opinion, April 12: Prof. Donella Meadows set out for "Truth or Consequences" and ended up in Disneyland. She stated the plain truth that human population and its demands have already exceeded Earth's limited supply of resources, then she dodged the obvious question and issued a mild warning. The hard question she evaded was asked by Garrett Hardin years ago: "How can we control population without recourse to repugnant measures?"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - In a gilded but often lonely life, Cordelia Scaife May, heiress to one of America's most storied fortunes, had a few cherished passions. Protecting birds was one. Keeping immigrants out was another. An ardent environmentalist more comfortable with books and birds than with high-society galas, May believed nature was under siege from runaway population growth. Before her death in 2005, she devoted much of her wealth to rolling back the tide - backing birth control and curbing immigration, both legal and illegal.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1985
Thanks for printing Elaine Stansfield's letter about our country's shortsighted new policy regarding birth control. We need such news, but it won't do much good. Democrat or Republican at the bedside, the patient will die. The problem goes deeper than a mere sacrifice of rationality to get votes; it goes all the way down to our reluctance to give up our ancient dependence on gods and to start acting as though our last name, sapiens, were more than a vain affectation. WILLARD OLNEY Hesperia
WORLD
May 28, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - A watchdog group Tuesday called on Myanmar's government to immediately revoke a population-control policy that blocks members of the minority Rohingya Muslim community from having more than two children, saying the newly revived measure is discriminatory, violates human rights and endangers women's health. The Rohingya, who account for about 1 million of Myanmar's 60 million people, are deeply unpopular among the Buddhist majority, who do not consider them citizens even though many Rohingya families have lived in the country for generations.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Over the past week, the Chinese government has launched a new campaign to strengthen enforcement of population control policies in rural areas where nearly 800 million people live. In a series of newspaper articles and circulars to local Communist Party cadres, the authorities have expressed fear that the family-planning rules are being eased or ignored in the countryside because there is now more food.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A Chinese diplomat indirectly criticized the United States this week for withholding aid to U.N. population control programs on the grounds that some Chinese women are forced to undergo abortion. "It's impossible to imagine how a family planning policy could be carried out with so great a success by coercion in a country with a population of more than 1 billion," said Ambassador Ding Yuanhong, China's deputy permanent representative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1994 | From Religious News Service
Americans generally view world population growth as a problem and support U.S. efforts to slow the increasing numbers of Earth's inhabitants, according to a poll released Wednesday. But Roman Catholics and Protestants who attend church regularly are less likely to support specific policies such as legal abortion and family planning programs than other sectors of the electorate, the poll shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1994 | from Religious News Service
A Vatican spokesman says the Catholic Church is seeking out allies in the Islamic world to defend the family and, especially, the unborn. According to Cardinal Alfonso Lopez Trujillo, a Colombian, the Vatican will hold a large interreligious conference on the family at the end of September, in which several Islamic delegations will participate.
NEWS
May 10, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jalal Shahpasand, a tall, husky restaurateur, waited until after dinner and the chaperons had gone off to watch television. After courting "the lovely Jila" for a year, he was ready. So he took her hand and softly asked, "Will you marry me?" Jila nodded. Javad Goudarzi, a handsome plastics worker with a thick mustache, chose the traditional route to marriage: family arrangement. When he met 19-year-old Theahereh the first time, he decided that she was the girl for him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1993
The horrors of China's coercive population control policy are well known. Compulsory sterilization, involuntary abortions and infanticide are among the tools that the Chinese government reportedly has used to keep a lid on population growth in that nation of 1.18 billion. The U.N. Population Fund--also known as the UNFPA, its original acronym--is a leading agency working to improve family planning services not only in China but around the world.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
If we truly are what we eat, then please, please, don't let me be the Cheesecake Factory's bistro shrimp pasta dish. Nor, for that matter, IHOP's country-fried steak and eggs combo, Johnny Rockets' bacon cheddar double burger, Uno Chicago Grill's deep-dish macaroni and three-cheese dish, Smoothie King's Peanut Power Plus Grape Smoothie or Maggiano's Little Italy's chocolate zuccotto cake. Why? Well, start with this: The Cheesecake Factory dish, which you wouldn't think would be too unhealthful -- crispy battered shrimp, mushrooms, tomato, arugula and basil-garlic-lemon cream sauce -- comes in at a whopping 3,120 calories and 89 grams of saturated fat. Wanna wash it down with that Smoothie King smoothie?
NATIONAL
November 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Nevada wildlife officials, who have dealt with a record number of bear complaints, are considering holding the state's first-ever black-bear hunting season. About 300 adult bears live in the state, primarily around Lake Tahoe. "It's a hunter recreation opportunity. We believe there is a harvestable surplus of bears out there," said Kevin Lansford, wildlife staff specialist for the Nevada Department of Wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2006 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
About 1 million residents of unincorporated communities in Los Angeles County soon will be required to spay or neuter their dogs, as supervisors Tuesday initially approved a sweeping ordinance designed to control strays. The new regulations also would require dog owners to have microchips implanted into their pets to help identify lost animals. "There is a serious problem with overpopulation," said Supervisor Mike Antonovich, bemoaning the thousands of animals that are put to death every year.
OPINION
March 4, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
BAD NEWS supposedly comes in threes, so it's no surprise that last week saw a trifecta in the race to breed ourselves into oblivion. There was the South Dakota bill proposing a ban on all abortions other than those to save the life of the mother (that's right, no exceptions, even for rape or incest). Then on Tuesday, the Supreme Court shut down an anti-racketeering lawsuit against pro-life groups that blockade abortion clinics. Meanwhile, the U.S.
NEWS
May 17, 2005 | Joe Robinson
A pack of endangered Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico's Gila National Forest has developed a fatal appetite for livestock. After killing four animals in the last few weeks, the trio of wolves is slated for termination. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service authorized a kill order amid growing anxiety among ranchers in the Gila as calving season leaves herds vulnerable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2004 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
About 150 animal lovers -- some clutching their favorite pets -- gathered for an animal rights summit Sunday aimed at stopping the euthanasia of thousands of stray cats and dogs in the care of the Los Angeles Animal Services Department. The Save the Animals Summit at Loyola Marymount University was held to launch a campaign to change city policy so that breeding control is emphasized citywide over population control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1995 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A newsletter editor for the Los Angeles chapter of the high-IQ society Mensa was ousted Thursday evening after she was criticized worldwide for printing articles that appeared to advocate extermination of the homeless, the mentally retarded, the old and the infirm. The resignation came after the national head of the society told the chapter to remove the editor, Nikki Frey, who had printed the controversial articles in a recent edition of the locally circulated publication.
WORLD
July 25, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
EUROPE * The European Union will boost family planning aid to poor nations to close a gap left when the U.S. withdrew $34 million for the U.N. Population Fund over concerns that the money might help China limit population through abortion and forced sterilization. The EU said it would provide $32 million more to African, Caribbean and Pacific developing nations to compensate.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Liu Haisheng went looking for a few good women last month. Not for himself, but for his 35-year-old uncle, who complained about not being able to find a mate. After scouting around, Liu finally succeeded in narrowing the field to one. But he didn't "find" his uncle a wife; he bought him one. For about $600, Liu bought 23-year-old Yan Dongju from a fixer who had lured the young peasant woman to this hard-bitten city under false pretenses.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|