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Population Growth

BUSINESS
January 15, 1991 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although they are out of favor in the current real estate slump, the day of the roomy family home and the upscale executive manse is far from over in Orange County, a prominent local economist said Monday. Developers are lowering prices on existing large homes and building smaller, less-expensive units to woo back buyers who have fled the high-priced market.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potent symbol of California's slide from economic grace, the Golden State on Thursday dropped off the U.S. Commerce Department's Top 10 list of states with the highest average personal income, for the first time since record-keeping began in 1929. Continuing job losses--particularly in aerospace and construction--and steady population growth combined to push California to No. 11 on the 1992 ranking by per capita income, the annual total income of a state divided by the resident population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council adopted a plan Wednesday to accommodate 611,000 more people in Los Angeles by 2010, and agreed to conduct six-month reviews of whether transportation improvements are keeping pace with population growth. The reviews were approved to address complaints by slow-growth advocates that the plan does not protect neighborhoods if growth overwhelms freeways, streets and commuter rail lines.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waves of immigrants, seeking the American Dream, contributed heavily to the nation's estimated population growth of 23 million people during the decade, according to demographers and social scientists. Moreover, growth in the nation's rural areas reversed itself once again as millions of Americans migrated to urban centers, according to preliminary Census Bureau figures that estimate the nation's total population at 245.8 million people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997 | CARLOS LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in the face of an improving economy, Ventura County's population grew by only 0.29% in 1996, the slowest growth rate officials could recall. In fact, new population figures released Monday by the state Department of Finance were so low that some local officials questioned their reliability. They said that with the county and state's economy on the rebound, they would expect the increase to be much greater.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The net migration to recession-battered California last year was the lowest since such record-keeping began in 1940-41, the state Department of Finance announced Tuesday. In all, an estimated 65,000 more people migrated to the state in 1993 than moved out, the department noted in its annual population report. Before this report, the lowest net migration on record was 81,000 people in 1967-68.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California last year grew at the slowest pace in nearly two decades as the state's stagnant economy discouraged people from moving into the state and prompted others to leave in search of a better life, the Wilson Administration said Wednesday. The state's population grew by 570,000 to 31.5 million people during 1992, according to the latest survey by the Department of Finance. That was a growth rate of just 1.8%, the lowest increase since 1975. Orange County's growth rate of 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2006 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Size really does matter. For the second year in a row, Flagler County, Fla., has claimed the crown as the fastest-growing county in the United States, according to estimates released last week by the U.S. Census Bureau. Its population grew at a blistering clip of 10.7%, leaving in its dust the entire Golden State, whose fastest-growing county (Tuolumne) lumbered in at No. 60 on the list of the 100 fastest growers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A group of international scientists is sounding a global alarm, warning that population growth, climate change and environmental destruction are pushing Earth toward calamitous - and irreversible - biological changes. In a paper published in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature, 22 researchers from a variety of fields liken the human impact to global events eons ago that caused mass extinctions, permanently altering Earth's biosphere. "Humans are now forcing another such transition, with the potential to transform Earth rapidly and irreversibly into a state unknown in human experience," wrote the authors, who are from the U.S., Europe, Canada and South America.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | JOSEPH ALPER, Alper is a free-lance writer living in St. Paul, Minn.
By the time you finish reading this sentence, 12 more people will be living on the planet. A year from now, 95 million or so human beings will have joined the 5.4 billion earthlings competing for food, clean air and water, shelter, and fuel, and the U. S. population of 251 million will have grown by 3 million. By 2025, the 100 million people now living in Mexico and Central America will have more than doubled to 225 million.
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