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NEWS
September 3, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Iranian gunboats intercepted two Soviet freighters in the Persian Gulf, allowing one to continue its voyage but escorting the other at gunpoint to an Iranian port where its cargo was unloaded today, shipping executives said. The Soviet Union and the shipping insurers Lloyd's of London said the Pyotr Yemtsov was seized off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, the scene of fighting in the 6-year-old Iran-Iraq war.
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NEWS
August 18, 1985 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
As Lottie Sebren, housewife turned seamen's aide, sprinted up the aluminum gangplank, a sailor's head popped through a porthole. "Lottie!" exclaimed Hup Cheng Tan, chief officer of the Neptune Emerald, a super freighter from Singapore. She planted a kiss on Tan's cheek, then navigated a labyrinth of hallways and staircases, ascending to the ship's old wheelhouse, which Sebren has helped transform into a lounge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
For years, officials in San Pedro have tried to spruce up the Port of Los Angeles by adding parks, trails and fountains along the water's edge. But it was never enough to entice Angelenos to make the trek down to the southern tip of the county. This summer, the community is hoping its fortunes are about to change. The arrival of the Iowa, a World War II battleship turned floating museum, is expected to draw 400,000 visitors a year after it opens Saturday. Another lure: the opening of a massive marketplace of handmade goods and specialty food.
OPINION
October 10, 2011 | Jim Newton
If you've wondered why people complain about the difficulty of doing business in Los Angeles, consider the Southern California International Gateway project. BNSF is prepared to invest $500 million to build the gateway, a rail loading yard that would stimulate trade and produce jobs. And yet, for more than seven years, the project has bumped along without being either approved or rejected. Way back in 2005, the Harbor Department held community meetings to gauge reaction to the proposal, but since then things have been in a holding pattern pending an environmental impact report.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Not one but two new Chromebooks went on sale this week, the HP Chromebook 11 and, as of Thursday, the Acer C720 Chromebook. Both machines run Google's operating system, but how do they stack up? Here's a quick breakdown: Screen Both laptops appear to be using the same if not very similar screens. They feature an 11.6-inch screen with 16:9 ratios and 1,366 by 768 pixel resolutions. Size and weight The two machines are also very similar in size and weight. The C720 Chromebook weighs 2.42 pounds and is 0.7 inches thick while the Chromebook 11 weighs in at a slightly lighter 2.3 pounds and just a tad thinner at 0.69 inches thick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012 | Bob Pool
Warning that a wave of demolition threatens to engulf Terminal Island, a national preservation group has named the site at the Port of Los Angeles one of America's most endangered historic places. A proposed road realignment would require the demolition of three pioneering tuna fish canneries as well as a shipyard that played a major role in both world wars, the National Trust for Historic Preservation said Wednesday. Additionally, a 61-year-old cannery steam plant and a trio of boat repair buildings that date back to 1903 are due to be razed, the trust said.
OPINION
May 7, 2012 | Jim Newton
Consider two projects that could have profound impacts on Los Angeles: Both would create thousands of jobs. One would increase traffic a bit; the other would significantly decrease it. One would be "carbon neutral," meaning it would not help the global environment but wouldn't hurt it either; the other would powerfully reduce emissions. Both could create some inconveniences to their immediate neighbors while delivering tax revenue, jobs and services to the city at large. One is the proposed downtown football stadium, and it has sailed through government approvals despite its potential for increasing traffic and inconveniencing people who live or work downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2011 | By Lee Romney and Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of demonstrators chanted, marched, danced and waved signs Wednesday during a general strike called by Occupy Oakland, a largely peaceful protest that snarled downtown streets, rerouted buses, closed the busy port and drew hundreds of teachers and city workers from classrooms and offices. The daylong, citywide protest against income inequality and corporate greed began about 9 a.m., as a crowd converged at the civic center, where Occupy Oakland has had its on-again-off-again encampment; it did not end until after an evening march, in which thousands swarmed the Port of Oakland, the country's fifth busiest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping swept into Los Angeles on Thursday for a brief but action-packed visit that will include a stop at a local school, quality time with Vice President Joe Biden and tickets to Friday night's Lakers game. "He's a Kobe fan," said Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who invited Xi to the game. The mayor and Gov. Jerry Brown welcomed Xi, who is expected to become president of China next year, on the tarmac at LAX. From there, they drove to the Port of Los Angeles for a tour of a shipping terminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The Long Beach City Council removed a key member of its harbor board Tuesday evening in an unprecedented move that leaves the port with two vacancies in top leadership positions. On a 6-3 vote, council members approved Mayor Bob Foster's recommendation to fire Thomas Fields, the embattled president of the Long Beach Harbor Commission. His ouster comes at a critical point, when the Port of Long Beach is overseeing billions of dollars in improvements while it continues to search for an executive director.
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