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Portable Classrooms

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Like lovers in Paris, San Joaquin kit foxes will always have Bakersfield. The rare little foxes come out mostly at night. They find fabulous food everywhere: chunks of cheeseburger from dumpsters, shreds of taco on windblown wrappers. And the accommodations: What can beat a cozy den in the student quarter — specifically, beneath portable classrooms in the Panama-Buena Vista Union School District? The 17,000-student district isn't crazy about the foxes, especially when about one-third of its 23 elementary and junior high schools have to deal with them on a regular basis.
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NEWS
December 10, 1992
Fire destroyed two portable classrooms at Temescal Canyon Continuation School early Wednesday morning. No injuries were reported, fire officials said. The blaze, which was reported at 4:42 a.m. by a custodian at nearby Palisades High School, was put out half an hour later, fire officials said. The cause of the blaze is under investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
To accommodate an anticipated jump in student enrollment this fall, the Magnolia School District plans to use 14 portable classrooms as a stopgap measure. "Depending on how enrollment goes, that [installing portable classrooms] may only get us through to next year," Supt. Paul S. Mercier said Monday. Mercier said that the number of students has been growing by about 3% to 5% in recent years, thus making free classroom space difficult to find.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich, Dallas Jamison and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Portable classrooms have changed dramatically from their tin-cannish, post-World War II predecessors, but the need for them has not. In school districts such as Santa Ana, Saddleback Valley, Irvine and Capistrano, where demand for classroom space has outstripped supply, these siding-clad boxes have provided crucial space--quickly. In the Capistrano Unified district, where 37% of classroom capacity is served by portable structures, entire campuses of ready-made classrooms, or "instant schools," have been built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1987 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
Frustration is the word parents, teachers and administrators use to describe the classroom situation at Dearborn Street Elementary School in Northridge. Because of overenrollment at the school, two fifth-grade classes--about 50 students--were housed in the school auditorium during the fall semester.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1996 | JOHN POPE
City school district officials, who have said they hope to reduce class sizes in the first three grades by the fall, have outlined specifics of how they will reach their goal. The Westminster School District Board of Trustees has approved a plan to hire 55 full-time and seven part-time teachers, and to spend $2.1 million on 42 portable classrooms. To take advantage of a state bill passed earlier this month, the district must reduce class size to no more than 20 pupils per teacher by Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
The Ocean View School District is taking steps to ensure that 15 portable classrooms ordered for next year do not emit harmful gases, a problem not uncommon in new portable classrooms. State health officials have discovered that formaldehyde and other substances commonly found in the structures of new portable classrooms, when exposed to heat, may emit fumes that are considered toxic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A meeting Monday to discuss the health and safety aspects of new portable buildings at Carl H. Hankey Elementary School drew more than 50 parents concerned about seizures by two students last month. Capistrano Unified School District officials told parents that there is no evidence linking the portables to the seizures. They said that one of the students had previously suffered seizures and that the second student has been medically diagnosed with epilepsy.
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