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NEWS
January 28, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is a hometown to do with Tonya Harding? Never has it been easy or particularly warm, this relationship between the hotheaded, gritty ice skater and the cool, placid Northwest. And today . . . well, today Portlanders are bug-eyed at what has swept over their community, and a good many are asking: When is enough too much?
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NEWS
August 12, 1993 | SONYA ZALUBOWSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fed by liberal court interpretations of the state constitution, the mild-mannered city of Portland, Ore., now has more nude dancing bars per capita than any other U.S. city, local police say. The bars, along with adult video stores and topless shoeshine emporiums, are overflowing traditional downtown locations into neighborhood commercial strips, where they can be found near libraries and homes.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Considering all the concern about the decline of reading and the too-easy urgency of electronics, who can explain, please, how it is that great bookstores survive today at the threshold of the 21st Century? Better, who can explain Portland, the Mr. Medium of U.S. cities, and how a contender for America's greatest bookstore not only survives here, but thrives? Certainly not Michael Powell, proprietor of Portland's transcendent Powell's Books. "Buy two, sell one?" he jokes, weakly.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | STUART WASSERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two years ago, this easygoing, proud-of-being-tolerant city suffered a blight on its reputation when a gang of white youths killed a black man with a baseball bat. Now, Portland is experimenting with ways of teaching its children not to hate. The effort--which the City Council will be asked next week to expand--involves pupils from four economically and ethnically mixed middle schools. The youngsters are given a taste of how it feels to be discriminated against.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1989 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer
A controversial plan for the Port of Los Angeles to pay one of its major tenants up to $6 million for coal exporting equipment--at a 10% profit for the tenant--was approved Wednesday by the Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners. The board voted 3 to 2 to approve the deal between the port and Kaiser International Corp., which is buying a coal bulk loader from the Port of Portland, Ore., for the express purpose of selling it to the Los Angeles Harbor Department.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Pistols and shotguns ready, 10 members of Portland's elite Gang Eradication Team emptied out of an unmarked van to serve a search warrant on a suspected drug house the hard way--at the end of a battering ram. One of seven raids executed in the rundown northeast section of Portland on Friday, it is a routine repeated with grim regularity by police departments in drug-plagued towns and cities across the country. But in one way, this raid was different.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
The nation's first experiment in giving clean hypodermic needles to drug addicts is to begin next month in Portland, Ore., testing a controversial AIDS-control strategy that has proven too politically unpalatable to be tried anywhere else in the country. The needle exchange program, announced Thursday, is modeled on similar experiments abroad.
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | United Press International
A man apparently angry because he was refused entry to the FBI's Portland office hurled a rock through two windows of the facility Tuesday, shattering glass in the reception area. Gary Nelson Wilkins, 28, was taken into custody for psychiatric evaluation, an FBI official said. No injuries were reported.
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