Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPortland Or
IN THE NEWS

Portland Or

NATIONAL
February 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
A one-acre tent city established by Portland's homeless has won the right to be called a campground, a designation that makes it legal. The 60 residents of the area, called Dignity Village, have battled for four years to gain legal recognition for their encampment of tents, scavenged planks and cardboard boxes, all of which violate the city's zoning codes if defined as housing.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
January 18, 2004 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
Responding to citizen complaints of foul-mouthed law enforcement, the police chief in this laid-back Northwest city has told its 950 officers to not cuss so much in the line of duty. The directive, which says officers must "self-report" each time they use a swearword on the job, took effect Jan. 1. Those found guilty of unnecessary swearing would face counseling and -- in extreme cases -- official reprimand.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2003 | Lynn Marshall and Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writers
Two members of the so-called Portland Seven terrorist cell defiantly defended their actions and condemned the government's case against them Monday before being sentenced to 18 years in prison. Patrice Lumumba Ford, 32, and Jeffrey Leon Battle, 33, both American Muslims, pleaded guilty last month to conspiracy to wage war against the United States; the pair, along with fellow radical Muslims, had tried to join the Taliban to battle U.S. troops in Afghanistan shortly after the Sept.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2003 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
With their public school system a national laughingstock thanks to the comic strip "Doonesbury," voters in Portland, Ore., decisively approved the state's first-ever county income tax to prop up the city's ailing schools. The new tax, characterized by one of its organizers as "an act of desperation," will keep Multnomah County school districts from falling into a budgetary abyss, losing hundreds of teachers and dozens of school programs.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2002 | PETER HONG and PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The latest strike in the war on terrorism hit a neighborhood that for many residents is a steppingstone to their American dream of middle-class prosperity. Before sunrise Friday, FBI agents rousted three suspected terrorist cell members at a pair of southwest Portland apartment complexes, startling children readying themselves for school and parents up early for work with the sight of their neighbors being arrested.
TRAVEL
September 15, 2002 | JENNIFER LOWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the doors of the MAX light-rail train whooshed closed, my husband and I settled contentedly into our seats. Steps from baggage claim at Portland International Airport, we had bought two tickets from a machine ($3.10 total), strolled to a train and skipped the whole nonsense of renting a car, waiting for a bus or catching a costly cab. We were bound for downtown Portland, one of my favorite places. I love its vibrant streets, its restaurants, its stores.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | Associated Press
Portland police are refusing to help the FBI question Middle Eastern immigrants hauled in as part of the terrorism investigation, saying the practice violates Oregon law. The Justice Department asked local law enforcement agencies around the country for help in tracking down 5,000 men for questioning about the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. But Acting Police Chief Andrew Kirkland refused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001 | TERRENCE PETTY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hunched over his racing bike, David Russell flies down a paved path paralleling the majestic Columbia River, past houseboats and yachts and through a little Portland neighborhood that resembles a Cape Cod village. Russell hangs a right onto a bike path that spills him onto a steel bridge spanning the Columbia, and then he zips into Vancouver, Wash. No time today for coffee at the Vancouver cafe where local cyclists hang out. The real estate broker has a house to show and needs to get home.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2001 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Do Jump! is in town, and members of the Portland, Ore., troupe are climbing the walls of the Geffen Playhouse because, apparently, they just can't help themselves. There's Shirsten Finley, grabbing onto a ceiling beam in the lobby for a spontaneous round of chin-ups. There's Aaron Wheeler-Kay clawing his way like Spiderman up the theater's brick wall. And over there, gripping the edge of the Geffen stage 4 feet above the floor, Kelli Wilson vaults herself into a handstand.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | Associated Press
Less than a year after getting federal recognition, the American Indian tribe that welcomed the Lewis and Clark expedition to the mouth of the Columbia River is in danger of losing its status. Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton told the Bureau of Indian Affairs on Tuesday to review the Chinook Indian tribe's federal recognition.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|