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Portrait

ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A British music scholar says he has identified a previously unknown portrait of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart that could be worth millions. The 19-by-14-inch oil painting shows the profile of a man in a bright red jacket. Cliff Eisen, who teaches music at King's College London, said that it is only the fourth known authentic portrait of Mozart from his time, when the composer was at his professional height in Vienna. King's College said the portrait was probably painted by Joseph Hickel, who was a painter at Austria's imperial court.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
W. Richard West Jr., the recently retired founding director of the National Museum of the American Indian, spent $48,500 in museum funds to commission a portrait of himself and selected a non-Indian artist to create it, the Washington Post reported on Friday. The portrait of West by New York painter Burton Silverman hangs in a fourth-floor lounge of the museum, which is part of the Smithsonian Institution and is dedicated to the arts and culture of American Indians. West has come under fire recently for travel expenditures.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By David Ng
A portrait of actress Farrah Fawcett created by Andy Warhol is at the center of a legal dispute that is scheduled to head to court on Wednesday. Ryan O'Neal, who had a long relationship with the late actress, is fighting the University of Texas at Austin over possession of the painting, which the university claims to own. The parties are set to square off Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court. At the time of her death in 2009, Fawcett bequeathed art that she owned to the University of Texas at Austin, which she attended before hitting it big in Hollywood.  The university had reportedly received one Warhol portrait of Fawcett, but O'Neal is in possession of another that is virtually identical.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1989
I cried when Baker died. Once he made me laugh by playing "Taps" when he heard I was drafted. God bless and keep him. Yes, Mr. Feather, it's impossible to believe that any jazz people live normal lives. RAY BABCOCK Montebello
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2005
I am compelled to respond to Christopher Knight's myopic and absurdly pretentious review of Salvador Dali ["Method to his Madness," March 19], in which the artist is called a "gifted but secondary figure" and generally dismissed as a charlatan whose talent far exceeds his depth. Knight attempts to measure Dali using a dubious sort of Postmodern/Poststructuralist critique in the vein of someone who has just completed his midterm paper on Derrida. The result is a nearsighted portrait that does grave injustice to the artist's work, vision and intellect.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
  Talk about a long, strange trip. Such is the journey of legendary drummer Ginger Baker, whose outsized life in - and often out of - rock and jazz music's most vaunted circles is deftly chronicled in the entertaining documentary "Beware of Mr. Baker. " Writer-director Jay Bulger combines warts-heavy interview footage of Baker with vivid archival bits, concert clips, jaunty animation and chats with various musical greats to paint a lively portrait of yet another brilliant but wildly self-destructive artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It's a small painting as paintings go, quite demure by the salacious standards of its artist, but, oh, the fuss it caused. As detailed in Andrew Shea's fascinating documentary "Portrait of Wally,"Egon Schiele's haunting 1912 painting of his mistress and favorite model Wally Neuzil had a complicated, extremely dramatic history as well as a legal and cultural significance that can't be overestimated. The battle to return this heartfelt painting - half of a de facto artist and model double portrait - to the family of the woman who originally owned it jump-started the current international art restitution movement that reunites misappropriated objects with their original owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
For the last week or so, I've been dipping in and out of a long-forgotten piece of Southern California literature: Timothy G. Turner's short story collection “Turn Off the Sunshine: Tales of Los Angeles on the Wrong Side of the Tracks,” published by the Caxton Printers in Caldwell, Idaho, in 1942. If you've never heard of the author, book or publisher, you're not alone; a Google search reveals little except for various online booksellers offering digital copies for download.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Miriam Katin's “Letting It Go” (Drawn & Quarterly: 160 pp., $24.95) is my kind of graphic memoir: loose, impressionistic, a portrait of the artist's inner life. Keyed by the decision of her adult son Ilan to take up permanent residence in Berlin, it is, in part, the story of her coming to terms, at long last, with her legacy as a survivor of the Holocaust. But without minimizing this part of the story, “Letting It Go” is much more than that - a meditation on love, on family, and an inquiry into art. Functioning in some sense as a sketchbook, Katin's story is delightfully open-ended, less a look back at a particular situation than a series of reflections from the trenches of her life as it is lived.
NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
It’s hard to imagine that anyone could survive anything as brutal as a gunshot wound to the head. And yet about 10% of the time, such victims do live. But what happens next? What kinds of lives do – can – people go on to have? To get a sense of the possibilities, staff writer Melissa Healy interviewed four victims of such injuries and chronicled their lives since the event: Leonard Rugh, shot in 1969 while serving in Vietnam; Matthew Gross, shot on the observation deck of the Empire State Building in 1997; Jackie Nink Pflug, shot in Malta in 1985 during an airplane hijack; Danny Rodriguez, shot in 2009 during a run-in with a gang after a party.
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