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WORLD
August 11, 2010 | Michael Gold, Gold is a special correspondent.
Their weapons are brushes; their battlefields are canvases. And here in China, where political dissent often leads to prosecution, the works of avant-garde artists can sometimes appear as threatening as a mass protest. Enter the Gao brothers, Qiang and Zhen, soft-spoken siblings who have long used startling images of Mao Tse-tung as a focal point for their sculptures, paintings and performance pieces. "I don't consider myself a dissident at all," said Gao Qiang, 48. "I never even think about this question.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
The room is arranged like a gallery, hung with photographs of various sizes and shapes, framed and unframed, surrounding the artist Catherine Opie, who looks pleased as she observes from a rocking chair. This studio built behind her house in West Adams is where so many moments from her art and life have unfolded. Back in 2004, she made a self-portrait here, topless and tattooed, nursing her young son, Oliver, against a vivid red curtain. Across her chest were scars left over from a much earlier picture, a one-word message carved into her skin and still faintly reading, "Pervert.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Realism is often ridiculed for going to great lengths to depict what we can see withour bare eyes. Its detractors, who usually prefer the abstract perambulations of Conceptual art or the mesmerizing effects of abstract painting, treat Realism as if it were a unified style. The thought is that it's the work of uninspired artists whose sworn duty it is to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. At Koplin Gallery, "Drawings V" dispels such prejudice.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2008 | associated press
More than 30 portraits and images of Abraham Lincoln are going on display at the National Portrait Gallery in an exhibit that looks at how the 16th president shaped his public image from Illinois to the White House. The exhibit "One Life: The Mask of Lincoln" opens today at the museum in downtown Washington and will be on view through July. It comes just before the city celebrates the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth in 2009.
MAGAZINE
December 1, 1985
English-born photographer Terry O'Neill has been shooting stars for more than 20 years. The portraits on these pages are from "Legends," a new book of his work from the 1960s and 1970s. From "Legends," by Terry O'Neill. Copyright Terry O'Neill, 1985. Reprinted by arrangement with Viking Penguin Inc.
BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Sonja Bolle
Motorcycle subculture gets loving treatment here in photographs and accompanying insider descriptions of the brotherhood. Birdman, above, is identified as a tattoo artist and certified pastry chef. Fans of Danny Lyon's famous biker photos may be disappointed in "Road Pirates"; the salient quality of these pictures is theatricality rather than documentary realism. Many of Hauser's photographs have an oil-painting quality, and these toughs posing on their beloved Harleys incongruously recall 17th-Century portraits of wealthy Dutch gentlemen similarly satisfied with their possessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
He's painted portraits of presidents, taught in major universities and had his work shown in galleries all over Europe. But this year, painter Manuel Munoz Olivares is spending much of his long, hot summer in Oxnard. Munoz Olivares made the trek to Ventura County from his home in Mexico City to paint a mural in the library of the new South Oxnard Center; his work will depict the history of the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1999
As a high school art-history appreciation teacher for the past dozen years, I enjoyed the opportunity to visit the Ingres exhibition this fall in New York. Calendar's remarkable front-page juxtaposition Dec. 1 of the Ingres and Cezanne portraits--and their accompanying reviews--reminded me of what an education in the arts, at its best, aims to achieve: the sharpening of the "critical eye" so that the viewer may see beyond the surface of the work. The two portraits are extraordinary firsthand evidence of the half-century of intellectual-aesthetic history that, at once, separates and links the worlds of Ingres and Cezanne.
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