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SPORTS
May 24, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Keller, Texas — Angels pitcher Dan Haren wanted a special gift for his wife, Jessica. Something personal and out of the ordinary, but not gaudy or sappy. So, he thought, how about a painting? "It is different," Haren decided, staring at the portrait he commissioned as he stood before his locker in the visiting clubhouse at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington earlier this month. "It's a unique thing to give someone a painting of yourself, your family. Pictures are one thing, but a painting is really interesting.
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WORLD
August 11, 2010 | Michael Gold, Gold is a special correspondent.
Their weapons are brushes; their battlefields are canvases. And here in China, where political dissent often leads to prosecution, the works of avant-garde artists can sometimes appear as threatening as a mass protest. Enter the Gao brothers, Qiang and Zhen, soft-spoken siblings who have long used startling images of Mao Tse-tung as a focal point for their sculptures, paintings and performance pieces. "I don't consider myself a dissident at all," said Gao Qiang, 48. "I never even think about this question.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Realism is often ridiculed for going to great lengths to depict what we can see withour bare eyes. Its detractors, who usually prefer the abstract perambulations of Conceptual art or the mesmerizing effects of abstract painting, treat Realism as if it were a unified style. The thought is that it's the work of uninspired artists whose sworn duty it is to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. At Koplin Gallery, "Drawings V" dispels such prejudice.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
The room is arranged like a gallery, hung with photographs of various sizes and shapes, framed and unframed, surrounding the artist Catherine Opie, who looks pleased as she observes from a rocking chair. This studio built behind her house in West Adams is where so many moments from her art and life have unfolded. Back in 2004, she made a self-portrait here, topless and tattooed, nursing her young son, Oliver, against a vivid red curtain. Across her chest were scars left over from a much earlier picture, a one-word message carved into her skin and still faintly reading, "Pervert.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Who would expect to find an art show in a real estate office, even an agency devoted to architectural properties? Melinda Fay organized the Good Eye Gallery show "Home as Art," which she describes as a pop-up with more than 70 works, all installed throughout the nondescript Banner Los Robles corporate building in Pasadena where Deasy/Penner & Partners keeps its offices. Artworks hang in offices, in hallways, from the ceiling. The concentration of emerging and mid-career artists means there are several affordable gift-giving opportunities in this countdown to Christmas: Small paintings by South Pasadena artist Jordan Daines begin at $220, and handmade silk leaf mobiles by Jan Carson are $200 apiece.
MAGAZINE
December 1, 1985
English-born photographer Terry O'Neill has been shooting stars for more than 20 years. The portraits on these pages are from "Legends," a new book of his work from the 1960s and 1970s. From "Legends," by Terry O'Neill. Copyright Terry O'Neill, 1985. Reprinted by arrangement with Viking Penguin Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
He's painted portraits of presidents, taught in major universities and had his work shown in galleries all over Europe. But this year, painter Manuel Munoz Olivares is spending much of his long, hot summer in Oxnard. Munoz Olivares made the trek to Ventura County from his home in Mexico City to paint a mural in the library of the new South Oxnard Center; his work will depict the history of the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1999
As a high school art-history appreciation teacher for the past dozen years, I enjoyed the opportunity to visit the Ingres exhibition this fall in New York. Calendar's remarkable front-page juxtaposition Dec. 1 of the Ingres and Cezanne portraits--and their accompanying reviews--reminded me of what an education in the arts, at its best, aims to achieve: the sharpening of the "critical eye" so that the viewer may see beyond the surface of the work. The two portraits are extraordinary firsthand evidence of the half-century of intellectual-aesthetic history that, at once, separates and links the worlds of Ingres and Cezanne.
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