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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2008 | Ronald D. White
The Federal Maritime Commission said Wednesday that it was investigating whether a clean truck replacement program at the nation's busiest seaport complex violates the federal Shipping Act of 1984. Next Wednesday, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are set to begin a landmark program to dramatically reduce truck pollution from cargo movement at the harbor. The maritime commission said it was looking at several aspects of the plan, including whether the port of Los Angeles would place unfair restrictions on truck drivers by requiring them to work for trucking companies instead of remaining independent owner-operators.
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NEWS
October 23, 1986
Congress has authorized $310 million to help pay for the first phase of a massive expansion program at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The ports would also contribute $310 million over the next several years to dredge two main shipping channels and create 800 acres of landfill, said A. Richard Aschieris, legislative officer for the Port of Long Beach.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach saw more of a decline in cargo traffic in February than other ports around the nation, perhaps proving there is one month out of the year in which there's little advantage in having China as a primary trading partner. That's because of the annual Chinese New Year celebration. Chinese factories traditionally close for the celebration for a week or more. This year, the factory slowdown hit trade traffic in February. The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, the busiest U.S. seaport complex, move 40% of the nation's Asian imports, and most of that comes from China.
TRAVEL
February 16, 2003
I just went on my 10th cruise, and it may be my last. I went to the Western Caribbean in early January, thinking it would be a good time to go because the holidays were over. I was wrong. The ports of call were overwhelmed with other cruise ships and teeming with people. Cozumel, Mexico, was the worst. There were 10 cruise ships there on the same day, and about 20,000 people walking around town. It was like Disneyland in the middle of summer. Can't the cruise lines plan better so everyone doesn't show up at once?
BUSINESS
January 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
After an unprecedented year of toy recalls, the Consumer Product Safety Commission is adding staff at the nation's busiest ports and pledging to work more closely with the U.S. Customs Service to stop suspect imports and identify potential hazards before toys hit the market. Congress provided the CPSC with an additional $20 million for the current fiscal year but has stalled on legislation that would significantly strengthen the agency's regulatory powers. Under the new initiatives, the CPSC will begin to place full-time staff at some of the nation's busiest ports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2011 | By Sam Allen, Alana Semuels and Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Powerful waves damaged ports and harbors in four Northern California counties Friday, authorities said, sweeping a man out to sea who had been taking pictures of the incoming tsunami from Japan. California Gov. Jerry Brown has issued a state of emergency in Santa Cruz, San Mateo, Del Norte and Humboldt counties. Near Crescent City, just south of the Oregon border, a huge wave swept away three men who ventured into an evacuated area at about 10 a.m. Friday, according to the Coast Guard.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
Trade at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach continued to rebound in April, marking the fifth straight month of cargo gains at the nation's busiest seaport complex. And one of the most encouraging signs might have been the sharp rise in the number of containers that were not carrying goods of any kind. The number of empty containers shipped out through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach in April rose by 20.2% and 15.8%, respectively, compared with the same month in 2009.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which together make up the nation's busiest shipping container complex, showed gains in cargo traffic for the fourth straight month in March, boosting trade-related employment in Southern California. In Los Angeles, the largest U.S. port, exports jumped 15.8% compared with March 2009, driven by such items as scrap paper, scrap metal, agricultural products and finished manufactured goods. Long Beach's exports also rose strongly, 10.9%, as both ports benefited from the weakness of the U.S. dollar against other major world currencies.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The nation's busiest seaport complex had its best January since the recession because of a weak dollar, stronger Asian economies and a steadier U.S. consumer. The cargo traffic numbers also showed the increasing importance of exports at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which rank first and second in the U.S. for container cargo, respectively. As recently as 2008, imports outpaced exports by more than 3 to 1. But in January, the ratio had shrunk to a little more than 2 to 1. Although the U.S. trade deficit hasn't declined, the two ports have done well in luring more customers that ship goods overseas, economist Paul Bingham said.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, long known as America's gateway for imported goods, are trying to generate more export business as the international trade sector struggles to regain its sea legs. The mission is vital for the twin ports and the thousands of people who work on the docks as well as for trucking companies, warehouses and logistics businesses in Southern California: A new report shows that the local ports' reliance on foreign toys, clothing and other products heightened the region's economic suffering when the global recession squeezed the flow of imports, while ports with more balanced operations fared better and now are recovering more quickly.
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