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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1985 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Modern-day desperadoes have taken a page from the exploits of train and bank robber Jesse James, robbing Los Angeles County post offices at an alarming rate--13 in the last 2 1/2 months, federal postal inspectors said Tuesday. Officials, who are offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to arrests and convictions, are at a loss to explain the sudden rash of post office heists. "We just really don't know," Postal Inspector Terry Fail said.
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OPINION
April 2, 2014 | By David C. Williams
Drive through the dilapidated main strip in Terry, Miss., and it's easy to see that the town of 1,063 is a hardscrabble place. And last month, life there got harder when the last bank branch in town closed, leaving in the lurch residents who have long depended on it as a convenient place to manage their money. The same thing is happening in countless other small towns and inner-city neighborhoods across the country, which have been left behind as banks adjust to new financial realities by shuttering branches by the thousands.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1998
The U.S. Postal Service will keep 10 branches in this region open until midnight Wednesday for the collection and postmarking of federal and state income tax returns. Most of the facilities will have uniformed postal employees stationed at the curb to make mailing tax returns convenient for motorists, a postal service spokesman said. Individuals who need to find the closest post office that will be open late Wednesday can call (800) ASK-USPS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Two men were arrested on suspicion of stealing hundreds of U.S. mail items including checks that were left at post office drop-off boxes in San Bernardino County, law enforcement authorities said Monday. The men were on probation and had outstanding warrants when they were arrested early Monday with unprocessed mail, opened mail, checks and burglary tools inside their vehicle, according to the Fontana Police Department. Police identified the driver as Angel Navarro, 24, and the passenger as Danny Camonte, 25, both of Adelanto.  They were arrested after an officer spotted a "suspicious vehicle" by a field next to a U.S. post office in the 16000 block of Santa Ana Avenue in Fontana, police officials said in a statement.
OPINION
March 8, 2010
You've heard this story before: Business is down, obligations to retired employees are growing and management is considering layoffs and service shutdowns one day a week. In this case, the organization in trouble is the United States Postal Service, which is projected to lose $7 billion this year and as much as $238 billion over the next decade. After commissioning several financial and management studies, the Postal Service is asking Congress for permission to end Saturday delivery. Postal Service customers -- virtually everyone in the United States -- should take a harder-headed look at the situation.
OPINION
August 8, 2012 | By Alasdair Roberts
The U.S. Postal Serviceis in trouble, and there's no telling whether it will survive. It's been battered by the Internet and a dragging economy, besieged by commercial competitors and stymied in its efforts to trim a costly web of post offices and delivery routes. On Aug. 1, it defaulted on a $5.5-billion payment to the U.S. Treasury for future retiree health benefits. Some think that it's time to privatize the service, bringing an end to one of our oldest federal institutions. The outlook is grim, though the crisis is not unprecedented.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Ringing like a Salvation Army bell, more Christmas-themed outrage is in the air. This time, it's a kerfuffle over some holiday carolers being ejected from a post office in a Maryland suburb outside Washington. It seems that the carolers, dressed like something out of Dickens, ran afoul of a federal law that prohibits organized groups from assembling on post office property. It's likely no one would have heard about it, except that J.P. Duffy, a spokesman for the influential conservative advocacy group the Family Research Council, was among the dozens of patrons at the post office in Aspen Hill, Md, on Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Martha Groves
Members of the Santa Monica Conservancy, a preservation group, plan to hold a rally at the city's post office at 5th Street and Arizona Avenue at 11 a.m. Saturday, the last day of its operation. The U.S. Postal Service announced a year ago that it would sell the building, and the conservancy and others have since been advocating for its preservation. In 2012, the National Trust for Historic Preservation put the nation's historic post offices on its annual list of endangered places.
OPINION
April 10, 1994
In his March 24 letter, Gary A. Robb gets up in arms over the prospect of a government-administered health care program. He offers the post office as the kind of management he fears. Actually, what he should fear is the reverse: having the health care guys running the post office. Between 1967 and 1990, hospital care costs rose 1,200% while the cost of a first-class stamp went up only 417% (6 cents to 25 cents)--about equal to the consumer price index. TILDA DE WOLFE Monterey Park Once again, a government agency can't balance its budget, so it's raising prices.
OPINION
December 12, 2013
Re "Operation Santa strikes a chord," Letters, Dec. 11 I too was touched by Diana Wagman's piece about Operation Santa and looked online to get the details about volunteering. There is one post office in Los Angeles that participates in the program. In addition, the program has surprisingly limited hours (Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.), making it nearly impossible for people who work (and therefore may be financially able to help someone in need) to get to this one post office in the allotted time.
OPINION
December 8, 2013 | By Diana Wagman
I was standing in line at the post office when a sign caught my eye: "Operation Santa 2013. " According to the poster, "answering letters to Santa has been a holiday custom for over 100 years. " Those who wanted to participate could choose one of the many letters to Santa received by the post office and write back as Santa, sending the gift requested. How cute, I thought. Kids request presents from "Santa" and they actually arrive. I remember walking to the mailbox with my own letters to Santa as a child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Lee Romney
BERKELEY, Calif. - Plenty of communities have resisted the U.S. Postal Service's sweeping real estate sell-off, battling to keep open historic buildings that speak of bygone civic grandeur and to guarantee old-fashioned mail service for the public. Few have succeeded. But this is Berkeley, home of the Free Speech Movement and protracted protests over civil rights, Vietnam and more. So when the postal service announced plans to sell Berkeley's 1914 Second Renaissance Revival-style main post office, decorated in New Deal-era art and situated in the heart of the liberal city's Civic Center, the town rose up. Opponents staged a 33-day encampment on its steps, and the mayor and entire City Council joined forces to block the sale, with backing from U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Oakland)
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Two Sundays ago I was roused from my midday stupor by the doorbell. I staggered to the door to discover a big box from Amazon deposited on the stoop, and a U.S. Postal Service truck just rounding the corner on its way to make another Sunday delivery. "What the --?" I asked. The delivery, as I was presently to learn, was the harbinger of the Postal Service's new deal with Amazon for Sunday delivery of the online retailer's packages in big cities. It's a brilliant move that serves both the partners and customers too. It builds on the Postal Service's reach in parcel delivery -- the USPS performs the same last-mile service in many communities for UPS and FedEx -- and provides it with a new source of revenue.
IMAGE
October 21, 2013 | By Ellen Olivier
The event: The "Grand Inaugural Gala" to celebrate the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. Presented by Salvatore Ferragamo, the affair came with cocktails, a gala dinner, fashion show of the Italian designer's latest collection and the first-ever performance in the Center's 500-seat Bram Goldsmith Theater. The setting: The brand new "Wallis," designed by architect Zoltan Pali of SPF:architects to incorporate the city's Italian Renaissance-style post office and temporarily house a pop-up Ferragamo boutique.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
It's called snail mail because it's slow compared with its electronic competitors - and electrons, unlike humans, work for free. The U.S. Postal Service is in “the midst of a financial disaster” and may need an emergency increase in postage rates to keep operating, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe warned Thursday.  The agency's plight comes despite a 1-cent rate increase on first-class mail that took effect in January.  A first-class stamp...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Endurance is a staple of performance art. In 1971, Chris Burden locked himself inside a small school locker at UC Irvine for five days. Three years later, Linda Mary Montano performed "Three Day Blindfold," groping her way around San Francisco with her eyes shrouded by a blindfold. That same year, for eight hours a day over three days, German artist Joseph Beuys was locked inside a New York gallery with a wild coyote. Marina Abramovic and Ulay Laysiepen spent 90 days in 1988 walking the length of the Great Wall of China from opposite ends until, finally meeting in the middle, they said their goodbyes and ended their 12-year collaboration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Martha Groves
Members of the Santa Monica Conservancy, a preservation group, plan to hold a rally at the city's post office at 5th Street and Arizona Avenue at 11 a.m. Saturday, the last day of its operation. The U.S. Postal Service announced a year ago that it would sell the building, and the conservancy and others have since been advocating for its preservation. In 2012, the National Trust for Historic Preservation put the nation's historic post offices on its annual list of endangered places.
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