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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed into law a bill which triples that state's post-production tax credit, a punch in the gut to Southern California's own film and TV community already struggling to keep business in the Golden State. The law increases the credit to 30% (35% for upstate New York), from 10%, on post-production costs and is the first of its kind in the country, said the Post New York Alliance, an association of film and television post-production facilities and labor unions operating in New York.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | David Colker
On Nov. 23, 1963, the day after President Kennedy was shot, NBC News producer and director Frederic Rheinstein was in a remote broadcast truck outside Dallas' city hall with his crew. Suddenly, a stranger poked his head through an open window. "He caused me to look up because in putting his head through the window he put aside a curtain allowing light into the otherwise darkened truck," Rheinstein later said in testimony before the Warren Commission, which looked into the assassination.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 1999 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From Hollywood to Santa Monica, from Burbank to Westwood, the folks who run the post-production business in this town want to know one thing: What does Liberty Media plan to do? The fabulously wealthy holding company in Colorado should soon own a majority share of Todd A-O and the entirety of Four Media Co., Hollywood's two major post-production operations. A subsidiary of AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Venkatesh Roddam may be the world's most renowned outsourcing executive. But the 48-year-old native of Hyderabad, India, thinks conventional outsourcing is a bad idea when it comes to the movie business. Roddam, a former chief executive of a leading Indian consulting company that provided offshoring services to the pharmaceutical, finance and telecom industries, is now in charge of Reliance MediaWorks' film and media services business. The Mumbai, India, entertainment company is bulking up its business in Los Angeles; it is one of several Indian and Chinese companies that have established beachheads in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
A joint venture led by Chinese film and TV company Galloping Horse has submitted a winning bid to acquire one of Hollywood's leading visual effects studios. Galloping Horse America, a division of the Beijing-based media company, has partnered with Reliance MediaWorks, the post-production company that is part of the Indian conglomerate Reliance ADA, to buy Digital Domain's visual effects studios in Venice and Vancouver, Canada, for $30.2 million. The bid potentially marks the latest acquisition of a U.S. media company by a Chinese firm.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1986
Lorimar-Telepictures Productions, Culver City, has promoted Chuck Silvers to senior vice president in charge of post-production facilities.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former MGM/UA Communication Co. executive and a man who claimed to be the owner of a motion picture production services company were charged Wednesday with stealing tens of thousands of dollars from MGM/UA via fraudulent invoices for post-production work.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1988
AME, which sells post-production services to the movie and television industries, said it bought the assets of a videotape-duplicating plant in El Segundo from Bell & Howell/Columbia Paramount Video. The price was not disclosed. But in a separate announcement, AME said it tabled a previously announced plan to buy a competitor, Manhattan Transfer, and its New York-based parent company, Tape Us.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the early '90s, what Robert T. Walston knew about Hollywood could be summed up on a snip of blank film. Six years later, the former Wall Street hotshot heads one of the industry's largest and fastest-growing post production conglomerates, a company he transformed from a struggling post-production operation here to a quarter-billion-dollar-a-year powerhouse with offices across Los Angeles and contracts as far away as Asia.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most people aren't aware that the Marx Brothers toured the scripts of most of their films in live theaters up and down the West Coast before filming them. It was MGM production head Irving Thalberg's way of helping the comics make sure their material worked with audiences. Something similar has been taking place at Stages in Anaheim. Four years ago, the group presented a play called "The Last Drive-In," by Terry McNicol and Brian Kojac.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
A joint venture led by Chinese film and TV company Galloping Horse has submitted a winning bid to acquire one of Hollywood's leading visual effects studios. Galloping Horse America, a division of the Beijing-based media company, has partnered with Reliance MediaWorks, the post-production company that is part of the Indian conglomerate Reliance ADA, to buy Digital Domain's visual effects studios in Venice and Vancouver, Canada, for $30.2 million. The bid potentially marks the latest acquisition of a U.S. media company by a Chinese firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed into law a bill which triples that state's post-production tax credit, a punch in the gut to Southern California's own film and TV community already struggling to keep business in the Golden State. The law increases the credit to 30% (35% for upstate New York), from 10%, on post-production costs and is the first of its kind in the country, said the Post New York Alliance, an association of film and television post-production facilities and labor unions operating in New York.
SPORTS
May 19, 2012 | By Mark Medina
Things to watch when the Lakers host the Oklahoma City Thunder at Staples Center on Saturday night for Game 4 of the Western Conference semifinals. The Thunder leads the series, 2-1. 1. Will the Lakers show fatigue? Kobe Bryant hardly showed much sympathy for his team having to play on back-to-back days. “Put your big boy pants on, leave your diaper at home," Bryant said after the Lakers' 99-96 Game 3 win over the Thunder. Still, this issue will go beyond whether the Lakers put in the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Your Thanksgiving turkey has arrived on schedule and it's called "The Nutcracker in 3D. " Director Andrei Konchalovsky's gassy spectacle, inspired by Tchaikovsky's classic ballet score and its fairy tale source material (E.T.A. Hoffmann's short story), comes off like a wan mash-up of "The Wizard of Oz," "Alice in Wonderland," "Toy Story" and, frankly, "Willard," but with a manufactured sense of wonder and tension. Worse, trying to hip up this retro-tinged package with post-produced 3-D proves pointless and merely undermines the film's otherwise OK special effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Lisa Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mark and Jay Duplass were despondent. It was 2002, and the brothers had just made an independent feature film that turned out so badly they vowed to never let anyone see it. Instead, they sat on the couch watching their favorite movies and wondering where they had gone wrong with their own. The two had been making films since they were little kids in New Orleans, lugging around a camcorder connected by cables to a VCR. Film was their life. But the next day, they shook off their self-pity, picked up their parents' digital video camera, and shot a scene for 20 minutes without thinking about it. The resulting short starred Mark as a guy trying to perfect a personal greeting on his answering machine, "who fails to do so, and then basically has a nervous breakdown," says Jay, 37, adding that it was based on his own experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2009 | John Horn
"You Can Count on Me" was the kind of Hollywood arrival that every aspiring filmmaker dreams about. Kenneth Lonergan's 2000 directorial debut about two siblings' splintered relationship was a solid art-house hit, the film helped launch the career of costar Mark Ruffalo and was nominated for two Academy Awards -- lead actress for Laura Linney and original screenplay for Lonergan.
SPORTS
May 19, 2012 | By Mark Medina
Things to watch when the Lakers host the Oklahoma City Thunder at Staples Center on Saturday night for Game 4 of the Western Conference semifinals. The Thunder leads the series, 2-1. 1. Will the Lakers show fatigue? Kobe Bryant hardly showed much sympathy for his team having to play on back-to-back days. “Put your big boy pants on, leave your diaper at home," Bryant said after the Lakers' 99-96 Game 3 win over the Thunder. Still, this issue will go beyond whether the Lakers put in the effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1986 | DANIEL AKST, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Monday approved a settlement that could approach $7 million in a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of 4,000 investors alleging that Burbank-based Compact Video overstated earnings and inflated its stock price from June, 1980, to January, 1982. Under the settlement, Compact will contribute 200,000 shares of its stock plus as much as $3 million to a fund that will also contain $2.5 million provided by the insurers of Compact's management during the period covered by the suit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Even before his "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" swept the Academy Awards two years ago, director Peter Jackson had announced his next project, a remake of the 1933 classic "King Kong." Although critics were divided on "King Kong" (Universal, $40), which arrives today in an enjoyable two-disc set, there's a lot to admire about the film, especially the touching relationship between the romantic simian (Andy Serkis) and the young actress Ann (Naomi Watts).
SPORTS
January 23, 2006 | Mike Bresnahan, Times Staff Writer
Kobe Bryant gets the shots, the points and the acclaim. Chris Mihm, Kwame Brown, Brian Cook and Andrew Bynum get forgotten. The Lakers reached the midpoint of their schedule with an above-.500 record by relying on Bryant, sometimes at the expense of the post players, who Coach Phil Jackson said had done an "adequate job" as a group. "Obviously I'd like to have more post-up game," Jackson said before Sunday's game.
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