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Postage Stamps

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NEWS
March 14, 1997 | Associated Press
For the first time in its 150-year history, the U.S. Postal Service is straying from the traditional square/rectangular stamp format to introduce a line of 32-cent triangular stamps, officials announced Thursday. The stamps, named Pacific 97 after a major international stamp show scheduled for May in San Francisco, feature a mid-19th century clipper ship against a blue background in one version and a U.S. mail stagecoach against red in another. They go on sale throughout the nation today.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
IPod. IPad. IStamp? Steve Jobs, the late cofounder and chief executive of Apple, is among several pop culture figures who will be featured on U.S. postage stamps over the next few years. The stamp for Jobs, who led Apple during its creation and then again during its resurgence in the late 1990s and early 2000s, will be available in 2015, according to documents obtained by the Washington Post. Jobs' stamp is currently being designed. VIDEO: Pebble's latest Steel smartwatch is functional and stylish Besides Jobs, others to be honored on stamps in the next few years include Beatle John Lennon, NBA legend Wilt Chamberlain, gay rights activist Harvey Milk and musician Jimi Hendrix.
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NEWS
May 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
Despite three years of billion-dollar mail profits, the independent Postal Rate Commission reluctantly agreed Monday to a post office request to raise the price of stamps by a penny. The increase could take place later this summer, although the commission urged that it be held off at least until January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Perhaps the U.S. Postal Service should commission a stamp honoring Shirley Familian. For 25 years she has been honoring mail carriers everywhere by turning canceled postage stamps into art. Friends from around the world clip the stamps from envelopes and send them to Familian, who patiently sorts them, stores them in zip-lock pages and then uses them to create fanciful designs that have a nearly hypnotic quality. She's now 93, and a three-month exhibition of her work has opened at the Los Angeles Craft & Folk Art Museum . Titled "Shirley Familian: 19,275 Stamps," the show features 14 hanging pieces and seven stamp-covered objects, including a skateboard, an iron and a teapot.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2012 | By David Lazarus
It's fair to say that any business losing almost $1 billion a month needs to rethink it's game plan. And that's what the U.S. Postal Service says it's doing. The Postal Service lost $3.2 billion in the quarter ended March 31, a hefty increase from $2.2 billion in red ink a year earlier. The cause is obvious: Mail volume is plunging as electronic communications become the norm. A record loss of more than $14 billion is forecast for the entire fiscal year. That's a huge chunk of change for a federal agency that receives no tax money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
It isn't every day that Pamela Anderson shares billing with Pythagoras. But that was just one of many oddities on display Tuesday outside the Hollywood Post Office, where the blond bombshell joined former game-show host Bob Barker to promote postage stamps featuring famous vegetarians. The limited-edition sheet of 20 44-cent stamps produced and sold by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, makes for an unusual assemblage — linking Anderson, Barker, Woody Harrelson and Joan Jett to Pythagoras, Mohandas Gandhi, Leonardo da Vinci and Leo Tolstoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2006 | From Reuters
The Beatles are set to appear on British postage stamps for the first time. Some 37 years after the world's most famous pop group broke up, Britain's Royal Mail will release a set of six stamps on Jan. 9 depicting iconic Beatles' album covers. The stamps "celebrate the Beatles' extraordinary cultural contribution to Britain," the Royal Mail said. The featured albums are "With the Beatles," "Help!," "Revolver," "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band," "Abbey Road" and "Let It Be."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1985 | From Reuters
Rita Lachman, widow of U.S. industrialist Charles Revlon, Monday bought the two legendary Blue and Red Mauritius postage stamps at an auction for $560,000. Wolfgang Jakubek, whose house auctioned the Blue two-penny and the Red one-penny stamp, said it took Lachman only 90 seconds to buy the last two of the 27 stamps known to exist. Lachman, who will be moving to Hamburg from New York shortly, said she does not collect stamps.
NEWS
July 13, 1993
Lowell Nesbitt, 59, realistic painter whose pictures of flowers appeared on U.S. postage stamps. The New York artist was commissioned to do the flowers in the 1970s and later commissioned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to do paintings commemorating the Apollo 9 and Apollo 13 space launches. In 1991, the versatile artist sculpted five brawny Rodin-like male mannequins for Pucci International to display contemporary men's clothes.
NEWS
April 9, 1990
Arthur B. Singer, 72, a naturalist and painter whose watercolors of state birds became best-selling postage stamps. The 1982 stamp series featuring Singer's paintings of birds and flowers of the 50 states is believed to have been the largest-selling special issue in the history of U.S. postage. He received the Augustus St. Gaudens Medal from his alma mater, the Cooper Union Art School, after 750 of his paintings appeared as illustrations in the book "Birds of the World."
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Proficiat Postaliosa! If Harry Potter commemorative stamps can cast a solvency spell on the U.S. Postal Service, that's some magic we can get behind. Tradition-bound philatelists should back off from their complaints. The stamps, depicting scenes from the movies based on J.K. Rowling's books , went on sale in late November despite vehement opposition from some serious stamp collectors, who objected that they were both un-American and crassly commercial. Michael Baadke, the editor of Linn's Stamp News, summarized the collectors' arguments when he wrote that Harry Potter postage was "dismissing significant established U.S. stamp traditions without explanation.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Responding to complaints that famous women were underrepresented on British currency, the Bank of England this week announced that novelist Jane Austen will replace naturalist Charles Darwin on the 10-pound note beginning in 2017. Inevitably, the move has prompted discussion about whether it's time for some of the male figures who appear on American bills to make way for prominent women. It's an intriguing idea, but it would require an important cultural shift that has nothing to do with gender.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The U.S. Postal Service's new Forever postage stamp honoring Johnny Cash will be unveiled Wednesday at a special ceremony at the historic Ryman Auditorium in Nashville with a gathering of country music stars, including some of the Man in Black's family members. His son, John Carter Cash, step-daughter Carlene Carter, Marty Stuart, Randy Travis and the Oak Ridge Boys are scheduled to appear at the event, which will be free and open to the public. The image on the stamp comes from a 1963 photo shoot for Cash's album “Ring of Fire: The Best of Johnny Cash.” PHOTOS: Iconic rock guitars and their owners It's part of the Postal Service's new series of Music Icon postage that includes stamps saluting Ray Charles, which will be released in September, and Tejano music star Lydia Mendoza, which are available now. The stamps are available at usps.com/stamps . ALSO: Jewel enters June Carter Cash's stage The last chapter in Johnny Cash's 'American' series George Jones dies: Listen to his one-of-a-kind duet with Johnny Cash Follow Randy Lewis on Twitter: @RandyLewis2  PHOTOS AND MORE COACHELLA 2013: Full coverage THE ENVELOPE: Awards Insider PHOTOS: Grammy top winners
BUSINESS
May 10, 2012 | By David Lazarus
It's fair to say that any business losing almost $1 billion a month needs to rethink it's game plan. And that's what the U.S. Postal Service says it's doing. The Postal Service lost $3.2 billion in the quarter ended March 31, a hefty increase from $2.2 billion in red ink a year earlier. The cause is obvious: Mail volume is plunging as electronic communications become the norm. A record loss of more than $14 billion is forecast for the entire fiscal year. That's a huge chunk of change for a federal agency that receives no tax money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
It isn't every day that Pamela Anderson shares billing with Pythagoras. But that was just one of many oddities on display Tuesday outside the Hollywood Post Office, where the blond bombshell joined former game-show host Bob Barker to promote postage stamps featuring famous vegetarians. The limited-edition sheet of 20 44-cent stamps produced and sold by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, makes for an unusual assemblage — linking Anderson, Barker, Woody Harrelson and Joan Jett to Pythagoras, Mohandas Gandhi, Leonardo da Vinci and Leo Tolstoy.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
"The past is never dead. It's not even past," William Faulkner wrote in 1951, two years after winning the Nobel Prize for literature. It's one of his best-known lines, but I don't think I ever truly understood it until I came to Oxford. For more than three decades, since I first read "As I Lay Dying" as a high school senior, I regarded such a sentiment as a key to Faulkner's writing — which continues to resonate because it comes drenched in history, in the interplay of the past and present, the bitter weight of heritage, the understanding that we cannot be cut free of our roots — without quite realizing that it was also a key to his life . Without quite realizing, in other words, the extent to which it has to do with Oxford, the college town 85 miles southeast of Memphis where Faulkner was raised and where he lived and died and where he is buried, and where, beginning with his third novel, "Sartoris" (1929)
WORLD
July 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Mexican President Vicente Fox rejected calls to withdraw a new line of postage stamps, saying Friday that they are not racist and critics don't understand the beloved comic book character on which they are based. He spoke as hundreds of people lined up at Mexico City's main post office, snapping up the stamps so eagerly that all 750,000 sold out Friday, two days after they hit the market.
WORLD
June 30, 2005 | Chris Kraul and Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writers
A newly issued series of postage stamps showing a once-popular black comic book character with exaggerated thick lips has reignited controversy over racial attitudes in Mexico, six weeks after President Vicente Fox was forced to apologize for remarks perceived as insensitive toward black Americans. The five new stamps show a cartoon figure named Memin Pinguin, a picaresque urban child who gets by on wits and moxie, that has been one of Mexico's best-selling comic book characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2011
A postage stamp honoring the late Oscar-winning actor Gregory Peck will be presented Thursday at a ceremony at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The timing seems appropriate, since one of his most popular films, the World War II action adventure "The Guns of Navarone," celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including best picture, director (J. Lee Thompson) and screenplay (Carl Foreman), and winning for special effects. "Guns of Navarone" is based on Alistair MacLean's novel about six men who are sent to the Aegean Sea island of Navarone to destroy a supposedly impenetrable Nazi military operation.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
The Lady Liberty of the Las Vegas Strip lacks the gravitas of her East Coast lookalike. She is half the size, a century younger and represents a coarser form of democracy: the freedom to choose which slot machine gobbles up your savings. Yet the Las Vegas replica recently snatched an honor from Lower Manhattan's celebrated greeter of the tired, poor and huddled masses: a star turn on a U.S. postage stamp. Postal Service officials, who issued the stamp in December, apparently thought the photo they'd selected was of the Lady Liberty dedicated in 1886 — not her progeny, who since 1997 has beckoned gamblers outside the New York New York Hotel & Casino, alongside an imitation Empire State Building.
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