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NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Rep. Dennis Kucinich has thrown himself into a latest cause: Support of hunger-striking postal employees who oppose cuts to the Postal Service. The congressman from Ohio played host on Monday to postal carriers, mail handlers and others outside the Capitol, pledging he would vote against efforts to shutter post offices and cut employee benefits as Congress seeks to close budget shortfalls in beleaguered postal operations. “There's been an effort to dismantle the Postal Service,” Kucinich said at the morning gathering.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Members of the American Postal Workers Union are launching protests Thursday in 27 states to decry a partnership between the U.S. Postal Service and office supply company Staples Inc. to run postal counters at its retail stores.   The agreement between the Postal Service and Staples, announced in November, created a pilot program to operate 82 postal counters at Staples locations across the country. The quick-service counters will be staffed by Staples employees.  Organizers plan to demonstrate at a Staples location in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday, one of four protests planned in California.
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NEWS
August 10, 1988 | From Reuters
More than 5,000 Venezuelan postal workers have launched a strike paralyzing mail processing and delivery in Caracas and Maracaibo, the country's two biggest cities, labor leaders said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The share of American workers belonging to labor unions held steady in 2013, remaining unchanged at 11.3%, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. Overall, 14.5 million workers belong to unions, that's down from 17.7 million in 1983, the year for which comparable data were first available, the agency said.  American labor has seen a steep decline in its membership for years, and the report released Friday suggests that -- at least for now -- the diminishing membership has halted.  [Updated 8:40 a.m. PST, Jan. 24 : Richard Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO, the country's largest labor federation, said the report showed gains in some parts of the country, including the South.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989
Thank you for enlightening the public about the tension involved in being a postal employee. As a letter carrier for 12 years, I've seen an amazing array of incompetent and sadistic managers. Mail is curtailed and discipline is issued by a top-heavy and self-serving staff. The money is good and the feedback from the people on my route is wonderful or I'd have quit long ago. MARK J. DINIAKOS Thousand Oaks
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of postal workers, waving placards and chanting their defiance, marched to protest an experiment by the U.S. Postal Service to use Emery Worldwide Airlines to handle its Priority Mail. The rally drew almost 500 people from around the Northeast. The Postal Service awarded the company a $1.7-billion contract to handle two-day-delivery packages.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A substantial number of District of Columbia postal workers are choosing not to complete a two-month prescription of antibiotics to prevent anthrax because of unpleasant side effects. Hundreds of those urged to take the drugs have complained about strong reactions to Cipro or doxycycline, the two antibiotics distributed to 2,100 workers from the Brentwood mail facility after letters leaked airborne anthrax spores at the plant in mid-October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA
A group of South County postal workers said Friday that they are stretched beyond their capacity and cannot finish their routes, and they put part of the blame on an automated mail sorting machine at the San Juan Capistrano branch. Homes on some routes do not get their mail until after 5 p.m., and some mail carriers are putting in unwanted overtime every day, said Mike Rotcher, a 15-year postal employee. Postal authorities admit that there are some kinks yet to be worked out with the new system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
It was about 3:45 p.m. Monday when Ron Ross told his wife to call 911. Outside their Angelino Heights home off Douglas Street and Calumet Avenue, a chaotic scene was unfolding. A geyser of water was shooting into the air, flooding the sidewalk. A postal truck lay on its side. And its driver, a petite woman who had been on the job only since May, was injured, bloodied and pinned underneath. And off to the side, according to witnesses, stood a 13-year-old boy who police later said was responsible for it all. "It was like something from a movie," said Rita Olivera Ross, the 32-year Angelino Heights resident who dialed 911. "There's this young Latina, and this truck is on top of her. It was a really bad scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Wanted: Elves to answer letters to Santa Claus from Southern California's needy children. The U.S. Postal Service's Operation Letters to Santa needs more volunteers to adopt letters sent by low-income children asking Santa for coats, food, clothes, shoes and other gifts. Elves choose a letter and return it to the post office so workers can deliver the reply and gift to the child's family.   The program, in its 101styear, answers letters nationwide, with 17 branches participating this year, according to its volunteer website, BeAnElf.org . In 2011, 75 branches participated; in 2012, 25 branches offered letters.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Shan Li and Ricardo Lopez
It might seem like a paid vacation for the 500,000 federal workers on furlough. They've been out of work since last week and were promised back pay once a budget is passed and the government reopens. But for many rank-and-file employees who live paycheck to paycheck, the shutdown is proving to be a massive financial headache. Some say their savings have been wiped out after a three-year pay freeze and a previous round of furloughs during the summer. The nation's ideological battle over healthcare and spending is hitting these workers in the pocketbook.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
It's called snail mail because it's slow compared with its electronic competitors - and electrons, unlike humans, work for free. The U.S. Postal Service is in “the midst of a financial disaster” and may need an emergency increase in postage rates to keep operating, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe warned Thursday.  The agency's plight comes despite a 1-cent rate increase on first-class mail that took effect in January.  A first-class stamp...
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Rep. Dennis Kucinich has thrown himself into a latest cause: Support of hunger-striking postal employees who oppose cuts to the Postal Service. The congressman from Ohio played host on Monday to postal carriers, mail handlers and others outside the Capitol, pledging he would vote against efforts to shutter post offices and cut employee benefits as Congress seeks to close budget shortfalls in beleaguered postal operations. “There's been an effort to dismantle the Postal Service,” Kucinich said at the morning gathering.
OPINION
December 21, 2011 | By Ben Kamin
The Postal Service may be fading away, but I have a memory of it and one of its employees that will never be marked "Return to Sender. " This was an incident from the late 1960s, an era of economic anxiety, fear and xenophobia. My father, who immigrated to the United States from Israel in 1962, had a spirit that was buoyed by patriotic participation in baseball, voting and his excitement about mailing a letter to a friend with a new stamp. He got a little confused one day, however, when he brought home a batch of green trading stamps after a shopping spree for his favorite things — automotive parts.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2011 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
After three years of brutal recession and tepid recovery, the outlook for the U.S. economy this year may boil down to a tale of three workers and their families ? their hopes, fears and, most of all, their decisions on spending the money they earn. For now, they seem to be getting their spending mojo back. But they are moving forward with a new caution, a hard-earned sense that events could quickly turn for the worse and they'd better be prepared. In an economy that relies on consumer spending for 70% of the nation's gross domestic product, nothing really matters as much as what the 90% of U.S. workers with jobs decide to do with their money ?
NATIONAL
November 30, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama's proposal on Monday to freeze federal workers' pay was an unexpected announcement that represented the first in a series of White House moves to seize the initiative from Republicans on the economy. The preemptive move was timed to precede a White House meeting Tuesday with congressional leaders on the subject of expiring George W. Bush-era tax cuts, and came just days before a final report from Obama's fiscal commission on how to shrink the federal deficit. "The hard truth is that getting this deficit under control is going to require broad sacrifice," Obama said from the White House.
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