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February 19, 2006 | Christine N. Ziemba
The website is part art exhibit and part nondenominational confessional where strangers show and tell their deepest, darkest secrets. Explains the site's mission statement, "PostSecret is an ongoing community art project where people mail in their secrets anonymously on one side of a homemade postcard." Postcard and secret collector Frank Warren, 41, a self-described "husband, father and small businessman" from Germantown, Md.
March 30, 1997
I thoroughly enjoyed your "Post Impressionist" article (Traveler's Journal, March 16), on sending home postcards when you travel. If your readers would like to know a great book that tells a woman's journey through the postcards she sent herself home, they should read "Around the World: A Postcard Adventure," by Pamela Terry (Quest Press). JOAN DAVIS Los Angeles While I enjoyed Alice Steinbach's article, she does tend to romanticize a bit. I was amused by one statement she wrote from Italy: "The night before I listened in the town square to a group of Andean flutists, their homesickness evident in the plaintive sounds that rose in the air."
September 18, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
A Santa Barbara-based environmentalist will demonstrate one approach to recycling Saturday at Soka University of America by creating "organic" paper postcards out of old milk and juice cartons. In a free demonstration sponsored by the university's Botanical Research Center and Nursery, Sei Hidaka, an abstract artist, will demonstrate the craft to show how the natural fibers can be used again.
June 19, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Two truckers driving loads of new cars to dozens of U.S. cities last fall welcomed the opportunity to be teachers, and to see the sights--Old Faithful, the Alamo and Plymouth Rock--in a new way. Drivers Joe Barboa and Rivers Livous, of Auto Transport Co. in Gardena, learned the historical significance of the landmarks and reported back to a group of fifth-graders at Serrania Avenue Elementary School about what they saw.
July 28, 1987 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Like avid bird watchers on guard for a rare grackle, postcard photographers lie in wait for a glimpse of a clear Los Angeles sky. "You become a part-time meteorologist, looking for cold fronts," said Don Ceppi, who has been shooting Southern California for 12 years. "You phone airports for weather reports and you even have friends check outside where they live." And what do you get? "Five, maybe six really clear days a year," Ceppi said.
October 4, 1987 | TONY KORNHEISER, The Washington Post
If this is Thursday, Gaston Green must be in my mailbox. He's always there by Thursday, smiling at me from the front of the full-color post card mailed by the UCLA sports information machine. Good old reliable Gaston Green wearing his baby blue and gold uniform, standing behind the Heisman Trophy, emulating the Heisman pose -- left arm cradling a football, right arm outstretched and stiff to ward off would-be tacklers.
March 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat is back -- despite dying in 1988 at age 27. On the first day it was open, more than 4,000 people turned out to see a show of his work at Gagosian Gallery in New York in February. His notebooks will be exhibited at Paris' Musee D'Art Moderne next year. And in January, Sotheby's auctioned some of his paintings; the one above, "Untitled (Pecho/Oreja)," sold for $10.6 million. And now a Basquiat book is being planned by former girlfriend Alexis Adler, who is now a biologist, that will feature a trove of materials she has held onto for years.
November 14, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Facebook Inc. is on the verge of a Goliath rollout of its new Gifts program. But one David isn't quivering in his Santa boots. Matt Brezina, chief executive of Sincerely Inc., said Wednesday that in the next few weeks his company is going to dive deeper into the mobile gifting business. Sincerely doesn't have the global reach of Facebook. But Brezina said there's room enough in the gift business for more than one player, even if the dominant player has more than 1 billion users.
October 13, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Andrew Khouri and Christine Mai-Duc, Los Angeles Times
The space shuttle Endeavour arrived in Los Angeles last month with an air of majesty, soaring over ocean and mountains, swooping past the Hollywood sign and Disneyland, and dazzling crowds gazing up from the ground. Endeavour lost a little of that grandeur Friday, towed by four trailers, inching down city streets from Los Angeles International Airport toward its new life as an exhibit at the California Science Center. But it was greeted with fanfare by large crowds who marveled at its sheer size against the city backdrop.
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