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October 8, 1989
When Robert Mysel took on a job as a letter carrier in 1966, a lifetime career was the last thing he had in mind. The Occidental College freshman just needed a job to pay his way through school, and he worked his Eagle Rock route every weekend and holiday. But he stayed on after graduating with a political science degree, even passing up an entry-level administrative job offer from the city of Glendale.
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NATIONAL
September 15, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
The U.S. Postal Service is considering shuttering more than 250 mail-processing facilities and downsizing its national transportation network, the first of what are likely to be major operational changes aimed at keeping mail delivery economically viable. The steps outlined Thursday, which the Postal Service described as "sweeping," would probably end overnight delivery of first-class mail but save the cash-strapped organization $3 billion a year. "We are forced to face a new reality today," Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
June 13, 1989 | From United Press International
U.S. Postmaster General Anthony M. Frank said Monday that postage rates will have to increase in early 1991 to cover the costs of mail delivery and automation, which will be essential by the year 2000. Frank refused to speculate how much first-class rates might go up, but he promised that the increases will allow the postal service to improve efficiency by expanding automated operations and establishing more postal facilities. "We need some sort of mail facility in every mall," Frank told a news conference.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
The U.S. Postal Service is on the verge of financial collapse and should eliminate Saturday delivery, close thousands of local post offices, restructure its health plan and lay off 120,000 workers to survive, according to Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe. Donahoe asked lawmakers to allow him to make "radical" changes to the centuries-old institution so it could avoid defaulting on its obligations. At a Senate hearing Tuesday, he said the Postal Service was all but certain to miss a $5.5-billion payment to its retiree health fund due at the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993
Regarding Duffy the Cat at the Channel Isles Books postal station (April 30): I was ready to support Duffy and the station's operator Judy O'Sullivan until I read that Port Hueneme Postmaster Barry Hancock said that "it's not proper to have the cat laying on the counter." The postmaster is right. It's not proper. Even in our permissive age Duffy has gone too far. Now, if Duffy were only "lying on the counter" . . . well, that would be proper. ROGER McGRATH Thousand Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1990
An announcement by the postmaster general mentioned that he would seek another increase in the cost of first-class mail--from 25 cents to 30 cents. What a hypocrisy on the general public. For the past several years, an average of over 95% of the mail I have received can be classified as "junk mail." I discussed this with my friends and neighbors. It seems that they, too, suffer from the deluge of junk. The postmaster general should treble the charges for this junk mail.
NEWS
August 3, 1997
In "Politicians Look for the Stamp of Approval" (July 23), Postmaster General Marvin T. Runyon Jr. is quoted as saying, "That is not our role," as a reply to the issue of printing a special stamp to raise funds for breast cancer. What is the role of the post office? Apparently it is more than just delivering mail. Why were stamps issued on Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, other entertainment stars and various cartoon characters? The obvious answer is: to raise money. There are a large number of stamps issued that go directly into collectors' books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1985
U.S. Postal Service managers proved Bruce Webb's point with the way they handled his letter to our editor. Webb works for the Postal Service and is proud, as he proclaimed in his letter to The Times, that "postal workers move more mail faster and cheaper than anywhere else in the world." But he has a less flattering view of his supervisors, having noted in the same letter that the efficiency and cost-effectiveness exist "despite some of the worst management in modern industrial society."
NEWS
September 1, 1985
More than my displeasure at the rising costs of postage over the years is my sadness/amazement as to the postmaster general's refusal to honor Laurel and Hardy on a postage stamp ("The Pictures on Our Postal Stamps" by Betty Cuniberti, Aug. 23). In my opinion, lesser individuals have been so honored, and during the hard times of the Great Depression in America, these two comic "geniuses" brought laughs to people (those fortunate enough to have the admission . . . ) during a period when laughs were "very" difficult/impossible?
NEWS
November 27, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Valmy is pure nostalgia, a leftover from the 1930s, an out-in-the-middle-of-nowhere, two-lane-highway road stop similar to those that dotted the desert landscape of the Southwest years ago. For 55 years Eugene DiGrazia--"The Valmy Badger"--has operated the same yellow clapboard Shell station-general store-Greyhound bus depot topped by an antique neon sign proclaiming "Valmy Auto Court."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2010 | By Britney Barnes, Los Angeles Times
Although a controversial plan to annex Sunset Beach has sparked plenty of worry in the tiny coastal community, Corinne Brubaker insists there's one aspect of small-town life that won't change: the post office. For half a century, the Sunset Beach Post Office on Pacific Coast Highway between 10th and 11th streets has functioned as the community's hub. Aside from a recent coat of buttercup-yellow paint, the one-story building has changed little in that time. Today, as the neighboring city of Huntington Beach seeks to absorb Sunset Beach, residents fear losing their quaint post office, where residents often are greeted by name and sometimes with a hug. Brubaker, the Sunset Beach postmaster, says they need not worry.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2009 | Sarah Gantz
The nation's postmaster general says delivering mail six days a week may no longer be feasible for an agency facing deficits in the billions. John E. Potter told a congressional panel Wednesday that cutting mail delivery by one day a week may be necessary to curb a projected loss of more than $6 billion for this fiscal year. He asked a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs subcommittee to lift the six-day delivery requirement mandated in 1983.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2006 | From Reuters
Online DVD rental service Netflix Inc. named former U.S. Postmaster Gen. William J. Henderson as its chief operations officer, starting next week. Henderson, who served as postmaster general and chief executive of the postal service from 1998 to 2001, succeeds Tom Dillon, who started as Netflix COO in 1999 and is to retire in April. Henderson, 58, will take over managing Netflix's technology, automation and distribution operations, including 37 U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2004 | From Associated Press
Marvin Runyon, the nation's postmaster general in the 1990s -- who stressed tight budgeting, customer service, automation and other workplace reforms -- died Monday. He was 79. A onetime Ford assembly line worker who rose to be a top auto executive before entering government service, he died of lung disease at his home in Nashville, said Vicki Kessler, a spokeswoman for the Atkinson Public Relations firm founded by Runyon's wife, Sue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
A bill to name a post office in Santa Ana after longtime Orange County postmaster Hector Godinez passed unanimously Wednesday in the House of Representatives. The bill by Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Santa Ana) was co-sponsored by the entire California delegation. Born on the grounds of Mission San Diego in 1924, Godinez became the nation's first Latino postmaster in the 1960s, serving in Santa Ana. He later was named Southern California district manager for the Postal Service.
NEWS
October 25, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY EDMUND SANDERS and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation's top postal official acknowledged Wednesday that he could not guarantee that the U.S. mail is safe and advised all Americans to wash their hands after handling it. The extraordinary public warning came as another New York Post employee was feared to have contracted skin anthrax and the U.S. Postal Service unveiled new safeguards, including gloves, masks and irradiation machines, to protect employees from anthrax-laden letters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001
The postmaster general claims "our productivity is up," so he informs the top 900 senior executives of up to a 25% bonus of their salaries ("Deficit, Yet Bonuses, at Post Office," July 19). That bonus is about what a letter carrier makes in an entire year. What an insult to the rest of the hard workers of the U.S. Postal Service. If the big boss wants to give huge bonuses, how about starting with Sun Valley letter carrier Gerald Apusen, who has saved two people on his route in the last few years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1988
Dear postmaster and employees: We would like to deeply thank the Santa Ana post office workers for their efficient and heroic care with our mail. On April 14, we received several envelopes, containing our 1987 tax return, marked "Contents found loose in mails, Santa Ana, CA 92799." Apparently, our 1987 tax return, which was being mailed to us from our accountant in Southern California, was put in a large envelope and not sealed by his office. Our 1987 tax return became scattered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2001 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fullerton's postmaster, widely criticized by employees and chastised in a recent postal inspectors' report for creating an "abusive" work environment, has been transferred, authorities acknowledged Monday. Tim Bomersback, 54, postmaster in Fullerton for 10 years, has begun a 25-week temporary assignment but officially remains that area's postmaster, the U.S. Postal Service said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001
The postmaster general claims "our productivity is up," so he informs the top 900 senior executives of up to a 25% bonus of their salaries ("Deficit, Yet Bonuses, at Post Office," July 19). That bonus is about what a letter carrier makes in an entire year. What an insult to the rest of the hard workers of the U.S. Postal Service. If the big boss wants to give huge bonuses, how about starting with Sun Valley letter carrier Gerald Apusen, who has saved two people on his route in the last few years.
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