Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPostpartum Depression
IN THE NEWS

Postpartum Depression

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most women get the blues after giving birth, but the difference between that mild feeling of "being down" and depression is like the difference between a gentle spring rain and a flood. Experts divide postpartum disorders into three classifications: postpartum blues, postpartum depression and the more rare postpartum psychosis. The "baby blues" are usually marked by fatigue and, frequently, tears, said Dr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
October 9, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A baby born to a woman who suffers depression during pregnancy stands a higher likelihood of becoming a depressed adolescent than does his or her nursery-mate born to a nondepressed mother, a new study finds. A large British study also found that among those with less education, a mother's postpartum depression -- as well as a father's depression following his baby's birth -- similarly raised the odds that that offspring would go on the become depressed. Mothers and fathers with more education who became depressed after a baby's birth appeared less likely to sow the seeds of later depression in the child.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 15, 2010
Postpartum depression is often blamed on dramatic hormonal changes inside the bodies of new mothers. Estrogen, progesterone and cortisol all drop dramatically in the hours after childbirth, and some women are thought to be particularly sensitive to this. But a new study suggests an alternate explanation. The brains of women suffering from postpartum depression reacted differently to images of faces that were scared or angry than did the brains of healthy moms. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and the Cardiff University School of Medicine in Britain performed MRI scans on 30 new moms four to 13 weeks after their deliveries.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Richard Simon and Tina Susman
STAMFORD, Conn. - The woman shot to death after a police chase from the White House to Capitol Hill had been suffering mental health problems, federal law enforcement officials said, including postpartum depression after her daughter was born and a troubling fixation on President Obama. That portrait began to emerge Friday as police in Washington launched investigations to determine why Miriam Carey, 34, of Stamford, Conn., drove erratically around the White House and Capitol Hill with her 18-month-old daughter in the back seat and whether police responded appropriately by shooting her after she repeatedly refused to stop.
SCIENCE
May 19, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
They might relish becoming parents, but they can also be unprepared for the infant in their lives. They're sleep-deprived, confused and irritable. They're the fathers. Discussions of the connection between mental health and childbirth have long focused on women, but a sizeable portion of men experience prenatal and postpartum depression too, according to research released Tuesday. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., found that 10.4% of men experienced serious depression at some point between his partner's first trimester and one year after childbirth, more than double the depression rate for men in general.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Naturally, the subject of the Sheryl Massip murder trial has come up in meetings of the postpartum support group at Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center in Mission Viejo. Massip is the Anaheim mother who pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to the charge of killing her 6-week-old son by running over him with the family car. Massip was found guilty Thursday of second-degree murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
It makes the headlines periodically: A mother kills her child--or children. We pity the children, the family and friends; we recoil from the horror of it. The last thing that many of us are able to feel is understanding and compassion for the disturbed mother. "Postpartum: Beyond the Blues," a Lifetime cable documentary showing at 9 p.m. tonight, tries hard to give us that understanding.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Late on a Friday afternoon in September, Victoria Karter walked into the Four Seasons Hotel, declined the offer of a fourth-floor room and took one instead on the 19th floor. A tall, dark-haired woman with an angular face, Karter, 33, carried a garment bag as well as a purse. She stayed in the room only about one hour, but it was long enough to leave cigarettes snuffed out in ashtrays and to put a ring of lipstick around the neck of the Jack Daniels liquor bottle she brought with her.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | MAUD S. BEELMAN, Associated Press
In the 18 months since his wife was imprisoned for murdering their infant son, Glenn Comitz has campaigned almost obsessively to free her, and to educate others about postpartum depression, the phenomenon he blames for the baby's death and the dismantling of his family. His mission has taken him across the country for appearances on television and radio talk shows and speeches to nurses' organizations and other groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1998 | JANE E. ALLEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Days away from delivering her second child, Amy Van Sickel felt unnerved by a sense of foreboding. Even now, two years later, she can recall that fear: "Somehow, emotionally, I wasn't going to be able to handle the birth." Indeed, after the birth, Van Sickel wanted to die. Minutes felt like days, days like months. "I went home, and I didn't sleep for six days straight," she recounts now. The emotional pain was also unspeakable: "as deep as any gouging wound."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2013 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
A woman accused of dropping her 7-month-old son from the fourth floor of a parking structure pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity Wednesday in an Orange County courtroom, a prosecutor said. Sonia Hermosillo, who has been charged with child assault and murder in the 2011 death of her son, was evaluated by three doctors before a judge found her fit to stand trial last year. Her attorney, Jacqueline Goodman, has said that her client suffers from " postpartum psychosis . " Hermosillo drove to Children's Hospital of Orange County on Aug. 22, 2011, and parked her car on the fourth floor of a parking structure, according to prosecutors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
In less than 48 hours, a father's world had turned upside down. Noe Medina's 7-month-old son was dead by 9:25 a.m. Wednesday. Shortly after, his wife of 13 years was charged with murder and felony assault on a child. On the grounds of UC Irvine Medical Center on Wednesday afternoon, Medina, of La Habra, tearfully defended the mother of his three children, who is accused of pushing their infant son off a four-story parking garage at Children's Hospital of Orange County on Monday night.
NEWS
March 14, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Postpartum depression among mothers is well-known, and medical professionals know to keep an eye out for signs that a mother's blues are affecting her child.   A new study suggests that they should be on the lookout for sad dads too. Fathers who are depressed are more than three times as likely to spank their 1-year-old children as fathers who are not depressed, reported researchers from the University of Michigan in the April edition of the journal Pediatrics.  Depressed dads are also less likely to read to their children at least three times a week.
SCIENCE
October 20, 2010 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Claims touting a component of fish oil as a mood enhancer and a spur to infant brain development may be a bit fishy, a new study suggests. DHA, an increasingly common ingredient in prenatal vitamins and baby formula and taken as a supplement by pregnant women, failed to prevent postpartum depression or to enhance babies' cognitive development or language acquisition, a large study has shown. The finding, reported Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., casts new doubt on a dietary supplement whose promise as brain food has been aggressively marketed despite inconsistent results.
NEWS
September 15, 2010
Postpartum depression is often blamed on dramatic hormonal changes inside the bodies of new mothers. Estrogen, progesterone and cortisol all drop dramatically in the hours after childbirth, and some women are thought to be particularly sensitive to this. But a new study suggests an alternate explanation. The brains of women suffering from postpartum depression reacted differently to images of faces that were scared or angry than did the brains of healthy moms. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and the Cardiff University School of Medicine in Britain performed MRI scans on 30 new moms four to 13 weeks after their deliveries.
NEWS
September 6, 2010
Postpartum depression isn’t just for mothers anymore. In fact, new fathers have been experiencing elevated rates of depression for some time, according to a study published online Monday in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine . A team of British researchers scoured the medical records of nearly 87,000 couples in the U.K. who had a baby between 1993 and 2007. They identified parents who got prescriptions for antidepressant medications or received a diagnosis of depression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
A San Clemente woman accused of trying to drown her twin babies pleaded guilty to child endangerment Friday and was given probation by a judge who called it a case of postpartum depression. Paula Thompson, 46, entered the plea under a deal that will keep her out of prison. Orange County Superior Court Judge Pamela Iles placed Thompson on probation for five years. She said the mother will be allowed supervised visits with the twins and her third child, a 3-year-old boy.
HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times
The therapist-patient relationship is crucial to people battling depression, addiction, weight gain and diabetes. But that relationship might not always have to be in person to be effective. Over the last decade, numerous hospitals and clinics have begun experimenting with telephone-based care to treat a litany of health problems — with surprising success. Now a new study has found that it can even ease the pain and depression of cancer patients. "Telecare provides additional support to people and can help them feel included and part of something," said Dr. Cynthia Lee Dennis, an associate professor of nursing at the University of Toronto who has studied the effect of telephone counseling in women with postpartum depression.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|