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OPINION
May 12, 1991
Read my lips: no world order. DAVID L. MARONI, Irvine
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Annlee Ellingson
Actor-turned-first-time-director Bruce Ramsay recasts "Hamlet" as a soap opera, setting Shakespeare's tragedy in post-World War II London instead of medieval Denmark, eschewing any mention of the play's encroaching war with Norway and compressing several months into one fateful night. The result is a focused, if at times melodramatic, take on the play's beating heart. Ramsay also stars as the Prince of Denmark, although it's unclear whether his family is meant to be literal royalty or metaphorical aristocrats.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2010
Times Wire Services British writer Alan Sillitoe, whose "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" and "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" chronicled the bleak postwar realities of Britain's poor, died Sunday. He was 82. The writer's son, David, said his father had died at London's Charing Cross Hospital but gave no other details. Sillitoe, a leading member of the 1950s group of so-called angry young men of British fiction, was acclaimed for his uncompromising social criticism and depiction of domestic tensions — often dubbed kitchen-sink dramas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Jake Tapper
The first person in the Bible to take a life, Cain, was cursed by the Lord. Was he turned into a pillar of salt, like Lot's wife, or sent plagues like the Pharaoh? No. "You will be a restless wanderer on the earth," God decreed. Contemporary fighters are often similarly cursed with a restlessness of body, mind, soul and spirit. Today we call it post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, but as far back as 490 BC, the Greek historian Herodotus was marveling at an Athenian warrior who watched the soldier next to him get killed "when suddenly he was stricken with blindness, without blow of sword or dart; and this blindness continued thenceforth during the whole of his afterlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000
Re "Specter of Nazi Hate in Austria," editorial, Feb. 1: Seventy-three percent of Austrian voters did not cast their ballot for Joerg Haider's party. Of those who did, the majority did not vote for this party because of anti-foreigner sentiments. Austria is a stable, civil and successful democracy. It has always pursued an outstanding humanitarian policy. These pillars of the Austrian postwar existence will not change. Concerns voiced in Austria and abroad about Haider's party are being taken very seriously.
BOOKS
January 27, 1991
Re Paperbacks, Jan. 6, "On the Road": Kerouac's vision was Whitmanesque and immense. His sound, unique and pure as a trumpet solo by Charlie Parker, echoes throughout postwar literature, particularly poetry. That his characters and the writer himself were outcasts, misfits and rebels is hardly a valid literary criterion. You'd think the value of "On the Road," "Tristessa" or "The Subterraneans" would be indisputable by now. RIK THORENSEN, LOS OSOS
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1985
Reagan's attempt to reclassify German soldiers buried at Bitburg as "victims of Nazism" is a fiction that will not wash! It is even an embarrassment to the generation of postwar Germans who know better. Let us remember that Nazism was exorcised not by conscience but by military defeat and that 95% of all Germans idolized Hitler to the very end--they just never forgave him for losing the war! I know--I was there. Reagan was not. INGRID SIMMEL Auschwitz, 1943-44 Mauthausen, 1945 Culver City
BOOKS
March 1, 1987
It is fitting that George F. Kennan writes the foreword to Norman Cousins' "The Pathology of Power." In his "The Nuclear Delusion" Kennan says, "I have personally never seen the evidence that the Soviet leaders seriously considered attacking Western Europe at any time in these postwar years." These are world-class remarks, like the one attributed by the old Washington Star to Charles Lindbergh to the effect that the Nazis had no aggressive intentions, and besides, the airplane would never be built that could carry a bomb across an ocean.
OPINION
June 4, 1989 | WILLIAM PFAFF, William Pfaff is a Los Angeles Times syndicated columnist based in Paris
To learn from history is not so easy as usually is made out. One may ask how did we go wrong? The more penetrating question is what were our attitudes that led us to go wrong? Attitudes are what we preserve after errors are corrected. It is fine to recognize errors, but one has to understand how and why they were made. Take the case of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and what led up to it. We have just observed NATO's 40th anniversary in an atmosphere of self-congratulation about the wise and resolute way Americans, Canadians and the European allies came together to make a stand against the postwar threat posed by Joseph Stalin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1986
Kurt Waldheim's election as president of Austria shocks all Jews and most Americans as a shameful example of Austria closing its eyes to Waldheim's Nazi officer past. What many people fail to understand is the history of Austria and its effect on the Austrian populace. The vast majority of the Austrian people were enthusiastic supporters of Hitler and Nazism. When the Nazis marched into Austria in 1938, they were met by cheering parades and a supportive population. Only in the latter part of World War II did the Allied powers recognize Austria as an opponent of Hitler, and even then it was motivated more out of a desire to keep it out of the Soviet bloc rather than a sense of historical accuracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne
It took me a few weeks to catch on, but the Getty's Pacific Standard Time Presents series, whose final shows come to a close Sunday and Monday, wasn't notable just as a wide-ranging reassessment of Southern California's postwar architecture. It was just as revealing - maybe even more revealing - as a collection of institutional self-portraits. Nearly every exhibition in the series said as much about the ideals, ambitions and leadership of the museum or school that organized it as it did about architecture and urbanism in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Heller McAlpin
Years ago, when he was publishing my first novel, Charles Scribner III told me a joke: "How do you make a small fortune in publishing?" The punch line: "Start with a large fortune. " The joke came to mind while reading "Hothouse," Boris Kachka's juicy history of the venerable publishing house Farrar Straus & Giroux. Roger Straus Jr., the man at the center of the firm, was a Guggenheim on his mother's side and a Straus - as in Abraham & Straus and Macy's department stores - on his father's.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
What makes an L.A. house an L.A. house? That question -- a more slippery one than it might appear -- is the driving force behind “Technology and Environment: The Postwar House in Southern California,” an exhibition running through Friday at Cal Poly Pomona as part of the Getty's Pacific Standard Time Presents architecture series. The single-family house, of course, has always been more than just a building type for the architects, builders, promoters and mythmakers of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
They captured a postwar Los Angeles of dignified church ladies and fancy society balls, of "Sugar" Ray Robinson at an Ojai training camp and Black Panthers at City Hall. Photographers Harry Adams, Charles Williams and Guy Crowder documented the city in the midst of social, political and cultural change as experienced by African American men and women whose lives were rarely reflected in the wider media. Many of those images are housed in the African American Photography Collection at Cal State Northridge's Institute for Arts & Media.
OPINION
June 23, 2013 | By Richard Rashke
This month, the Associated Press exposed yet another alleged Nazi collaborator, Michael Karkoc, a carpenter who had been living quietly in Minnesota for decades. During World War II, the news service reported, he was "the top commander of a Nazi SS-led unit accused of burning villages filled with women and children. " FOR THE RECORD: Surrender: A June 23 Op-Ed about Nazi collaborators immigrating to the United States after World War II stated that Germany surrendered in June 1945.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Lore Music Box, $29.95; Blu-ray, $34.95 Available on VOD May 28. Australian writer-director Cate Shortland garnered international attention with her 2004 debut feature, "Somersault," about a teen runaway discovering the power of her sexuality. Shortland's long-in-coming follow-up adapts the Rachel Seiffert novel "The Dark Room" (with a screenplay co-written by Robin Mukherjee), about another adolescent girl, who helps her brothers and sisters travel across postwar Germany after their Nazi parents are arrested as war criminals.
OPINION
April 28, 2004
Michael Ramirez's Sunday editorial cartoon, which was both silly and insulting, indicates that he badly requires some history lessons. Franklin Roosevelt died while the Allied invasion of Europe was still ongoing; it was Harry Truman who had to deal with the task of a U.S. occupation. Another lesson is that of course the GIs occupying postwar Germany didn't want to incur casualties or terrorism, but they didn't need to withdraw to achieve that goal. The American forces had both sufficient numbers and sufficient moral authority to rebuild postwar Germany without suffering a single combat death.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
When British authorities the other day denied an export license for a 15th-century Flemish manuscript acquired last December by the J. Paul Getty Museum at a London auction, few could have been surprised. Stopping the export of exceptional works of art from the United Kingdom is business as usual for the government's catch-all Department for Culture, Media and Sport . Why? Often, as in this particular case, for no defensible reason. ART: Can you guess the high price?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Karen Wada
Passionate and prolific, Garry Winogrand always had an eye out for the next picture, the next glimpse of life in the streets of his native New York and venues as varied as a Texas rodeo and Venice Beach. His subjects included protesters, partygoers and passersby. His seemingly haphazard images intrigued - and annoyed. He came to be seen as a singular observer of postwar America's hopes and anxieties, one the influential curator John Szarkowski called "the central photographer of his generation.
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