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Potassium

NEWS
July 21, 1992 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you've just returned from a day at the beach or an afternoon bicycle ride, stop in the kitchen. Even though you may not feel hungry, it's important to replenish your body after all that sweating and activity. "Even though we tend not to feel hungry during the summer months, sound nutrition is more important than ever," says registered dietitian Becky Posada of St. Joseph Hospital in Orange. Sweating causes losses in potassium and sodium and can deplete glucose stores, which give us energy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO and CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state plans to distribute potassium iodide tablets to nearly half a million people living within 10 miles of nuclear generating stations in San Onofre and Diablo Canyon, saying the pills could help protect the public in the event of radiation exposure. The decision comes six months after the Nuclear Regulatory Commission offered the pills to the 34 states with nuclear power reactors. Officials said the idea was developed over several years but took on urgency after the Sept.
HEALTH
May 26, 2012 | By Ashley Dunn, Los Angeles Times
Take a look at the most popular endurance sport drinks and you'll notice a surprising similarity in ingredients. There are carbohydrates (usually in the form of sugar), sodium, potassium and sometimes a touch of protein. You'll notice something else - these drinks are expensive. It can cost $1.75 or more to fill one 24-ounce water bottle - and you have to drink a bottle an hour to keep up a good flow of nutrients and liquid while you work out. There's an easy way around the expense: making your own endurance drink.
HEALTH
February 16, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Americans eat far too much salt and not enough potassium -- and they don't need a water bottle with them at all times. The Institute of Medicine, in a report released last week, said that most people are getting enough water from beverages at meals and snack times, from water-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables and from responding to their own thirst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does the city of Santa Clarita have that San Diego and Ventura don't? Prunes at City Hall. The California Prune Board will give the city $1,000 and 600 snack packs of the moist, wrinkled fruit to start a pro-prune campaign aimed at encouraging people to try exotic prune recipes--from strawberry-prune milkshakes to prune coleslaw--after taking vigorous walks. San Diego and Ventura also applied for the program, which is co-sponsored by the nonprofit National Recreation and Park Assn.
SCIENCE
September 2, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Consumers who buy organic fruits and vegetables because they think they're tastier, more nutritious and better for the environment are getting at least some of what they're paying for, according to a study published online Wednesday. The finding is based on a detailed comparison of organic and conventional strawberries from 13 pairs of neighboring farms in Watsonville, Calif., where 40% of the state's strawberry crop is produced. A team of ecologists, food chemists, soil scientists and other experts analyzed a variety of factors before concluding that the organic berries — and the dirt they were raised in — were superior.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2002 | Randy Trick, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Postal Service is purchasing 1.6 million doses of potassium iodide pills to protect its employees against thyroid cancer in the event of a nuclear explosion or meltdown. Taking a cue from the anthrax scare a year ago, the postal service is spending nearly $293,000 to give its 750,000 employees the opportunity to have two days' worth of potassium iodide tablets waiting for them at work. The cost of buying the medication breaks down to 18.
OPINION
November 7, 2005 | David Margolick, DAVID MARGOLICK, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, is the author of "Beyond Glory: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink" (Knopf, 2005).
SOMETIME IN the 1930s, a black inmate on death row in a Southern state is asphyxiated in its gas chamber. As he breathes in the fatal fumes -- and as observers watch from behind a thick pane of glass -- he cries out: "Save me, Joe Louis! Save me, Joe Louis!" The story has been told ever since, usually to illustrate Louis' near-messianic status in a black America that had little else going for it in the years before World War II. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was among those telling it.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The cost of executions is soaring, especially in the state that conducts the most: Texas. The reason? The necessary drugs have become increasingly hard to get. A year ago it cost the Texas Department of Criminal Justice $83.55 for the drugs used to carry out an execution -- sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide and potassium chloride. Then last March the state was forced to replace sodium thiopental with pentobarbital after the U.S. supplier of the former drug halted distribution amid international protests.
FOOD
October 20, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
The other day I was sitting at a local bar catching a game of football with a friend. The bartender handed us a bowl of pretzels. Noshing on a few over a beer, I got to thinking. I can't remember the last time I had a really great pretzel. Freshly puffed and temptingly aromatic, they're the ones with the deep brown sheen that — if you're lucky — you get still warm, the large specks of salt catching the light just so as they're slid out of the oven. Chance upon a good bakery at the right time, and you might be able to snag one. But homemade?
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