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Potassium

FOOD
September 12, 1985 | TONI TIPTON
Dinner time is usually a long time away for children who arrive home from school as early as 3 p.m. But a made-ahead treat that children heat in the microwave can ensure that they are eating right, even when you're away. Most of today's health-conscious parents will want to provide healthy snacks for their after-school munchers but may find that today's children look cautiously at concoctions of celery, peanut butter and the like.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO and CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state plans to distribute potassium iodide tablets to nearly half a million people living within 10 miles of nuclear generating stations in San Onofre and Diablo Canyon, saying the pills could help protect the public in the event of radiation exposure. The decision comes six months after the Nuclear Regulatory Commission offered the pills to the 34 states with nuclear power reactors. Officials said the idea was developed over several years but took on urgency after the Sept.
HEALTH
February 16, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Americans eat far too much salt and not enough potassium -- and they don't need a water bottle with them at all times. The Institute of Medicine, in a report released last week, said that most people are getting enough water from beverages at meals and snack times, from water-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables and from responding to their own thirst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does the city of Santa Clarita have that San Diego and Ventura don't? Prunes at City Hall. The California Prune Board will give the city $1,000 and 600 snack packs of the moist, wrinkled fruit to start a pro-prune campaign aimed at encouraging people to try exotic prune recipes--from strawberry-prune milkshakes to prune coleslaw--after taking vigorous walks. San Diego and Ventura also applied for the program, which is co-sponsored by the nonprofit National Recreation and Park Assn.
HEALTH
May 26, 2012 | By Ashley Dunn, Los Angeles Times
Take a look at the most popular endurance sport drinks and you'll notice a surprising similarity in ingredients. There are carbohydrates (usually in the form of sugar), sodium, potassium and sometimes a touch of protein. You'll notice something else - these drinks are expensive. It can cost $1.75 or more to fill one 24-ounce water bottle - and you have to drink a bottle an hour to keep up a good flow of nutrients and liquid while you work out. There's an easy way around the expense: making your own endurance drink.
SCIENCE
September 2, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Consumers who buy organic fruits and vegetables because they think they're tastier, more nutritious and better for the environment are getting at least some of what they're paying for, according to a study published online Wednesday. The finding is based on a detailed comparison of organic and conventional strawberries from 13 pairs of neighboring farms in Watsonville, Calif., where 40% of the state's strawberry crop is produced. A team of ecologists, food chemists, soil scientists and other experts analyzed a variety of factors before concluding that the organic berries — and the dirt they were raised in — were superior.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2002 | Randy Trick, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Postal Service is purchasing 1.6 million doses of potassium iodide pills to protect its employees against thyroid cancer in the event of a nuclear explosion or meltdown. Taking a cue from the anthrax scare a year ago, the postal service is spending nearly $293,000 to give its 750,000 employees the opportunity to have two days' worth of potassium iodide tablets waiting for them at work. The cost of buying the medication breaks down to 18.
HOME & GARDEN
July 25, 2009 | Diane R. Krieger
"The Kriegers have not been able to successfully implement Cesar's technique." There it is in black and white for all to see, on page 299 of the Dog Whisperer's "Ultimate Episode Guide." The sad truth. Our episode (titled "Raw Cotton") first aired more than two years ago. To this day, whenever I see a rerun, I cringe at the closing scene: me, boasting about Cesar Millan's method being "idiot simple." Apparently, not simple enough for this idiot.
HEALTH
September 15, 2008 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
A tangy, sour, fermented milk drink may not sound like a likely candidate to move from health food stores to mainstream supermarkets, but that's exactly what kefir has done. The beverage is steadily gaining fans convinced of the health benefits -- proponents tout its purported ability to help cure cancer, reduce high cholesterol and treat high blood pressure -- yet the scientific studies to support the claims are still few. Kefir's closest cousin is yogurt, also made by fermenting milk with bacteria.
FOOD
October 20, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
The other day I was sitting at a local bar catching a game of football with a friend. The bartender handed us a bowl of pretzels. Noshing on a few over a beer, I got to thinking. I can't remember the last time I had a really great pretzel. Freshly puffed and temptingly aromatic, they're the ones with the deep brown sheen that — if you're lucky — you get still warm, the large specks of salt catching the light just so as they're slid out of the oven. Chance upon a good bakery at the right time, and you might be able to snag one. But homemade?
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