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Pound Animals

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1986
We are writing to express our appreciation for your June 17 editorial commending the Board of Supervisors for its decision to continue the sale of pound animals for medical research. We agree with your editorial comment that pound animals "can serve usefully in bringing new hope through research on the frontiers of modern medicine." Because the cost of doing medical research is very high, animal research would become much more expensive if pound animals were no longer available, and many vital research projects would be eliminated or curtailed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2010 | By Tony Barboza and Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times
You know it's going to be a bad day when it's barely dawn and you're already being chased by police officers, firefighters, three rifle-toting game wardens and a news helicopter, and you're stuck up a tree — in a cemetery, no less. That's the predicament a California black bear faced Tuesday after somehow taking a very wrong turn out of a forest and ending up in a three-hour standoff with authorities in Oxnard. The wayward but intrepid black bear was first spotted around 2:15 a.m., lurking around a fire station on Vineyard Avenue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1987
The Trull article missed the entire point of the bill to end pound seizure (prohibiting the use of pound animals in medical research). Shelters were originally designed to protect animals. Sending animals to research, where they undergo painful experiences and spend the rest of their lives in small cages in social isolation is hardly my idea of protection. These are animals that have had good home and loving families and that have trusted humans. Many people, having become aware of this practice of pound seizure, now have lost trust in the shelters and face a major dilemma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2004 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
An 18-month-old Santa Ana girl was in serious condition Monday with face and head wounds after the family's 90-pound pit bull attacked her, police said. The attack occurred after the child's mother, Nhouka Vange, 24, stepped out of the room where the youngster was playing shortly before 6 p.m. Sunday, authorities said. They don't know what provoked the 7-year-old dog, named Brownie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1988
In an effort to reduce the number of lost or abandoned pets that roam the streets and are eventually put to death, Los Angeles officials are embarking on a pilot program to sterilize pound puppies and kittens at a younger age. Traditional veterinary medicine holds that pets are not ready to be spayed or neutered until they reach 6 months, but that philosophy is changing, according to Robert Rush, general manager of the city Department of Animal Regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1990
Regarding the July 1 Commentary "Should Pound Animals Be Used for Research?": With the 1990-91 contracts, the county Department of Animal Control is, for the first time, reporting to the cities the disposition of the animals picked up in their streets. Why then doesn't the Department of Animal Control require UC San Diego to report on a monthly basis what the pound animals are being used for, exactly what experiments and what protocols? JEANNE NELSON San Diego
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1987
If you lost your pet and couldn't find him, would you want him to be sold for laboratory research? In San Diego, through a Board of Supervisors' contract, the Department of Animal Control sells about 1,000 animals yearly to UC San Diego. This practice is called pound seizure. Pound seizure is not needed for vital medical research. Hundreds of scientists have testified that pound animals are used in research because they are cheap--not because they are good models for humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1987
I am writing to address the issue of allowing UC San Diego to continue to use animals from the pound for research and teaching. No one enjoys a confrontation with a group of people who range from intelligent and reasonable humanitarians to fanatical lawbreakers, especially when the moral concerns of the former are twisted to justify the destructive actions and threats of the latter. Animal-rights activists have wrought some very positive changes in the way animals are used in biomedical research, but the extremists are still trying to bring biomedical experimentation with living animals to a halt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
On the battlefield of animal research, vocabulary is a versatile weapon. Researchers use terms like animal "discomfort." They talk of "post-operative analgesia" and "sacrificing" of animal subjects. They stress advances in biomedical research that "enhance and extend" life. They talk of "patients' rights." Their adversaries prefer terms like "pain and suffering" and "psychological trauma." They speak of "sentient creatures" and exploitation of "non-human animals."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1987
The letter from Dr. Paul Friedman of UC San Diego in regard to pound seizure brings new meaning to the old phrase, "Trust me, I'm a doctor." His comments, unsubstantiated by any facts, insults the intelligence of San Diego residents. First, he invokes the image of "fanatics" when, in fact, it is the established humane organizations and concerned private citizens who make up the bulk of the opposition to pound seizure. Friedman then insists that animals used at UCSD are not pets, but feral animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2002 | JESSICA BLANCHARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 300-pound black bear startled some Saticoy residents and led Ventura police and county animal control workers on a chase before finally being cornered and tranquilized early Friday. The bear was first sighted at Saticoy Elementary School shortly after midnight, but it eluded Ventura police officers who were sent to take it back to the mountains. Frightened Saticoy residents in the 10400 block of Darling Road called in 30 minutes later to report a bear in their yard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2001 | CARRI KARUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kelly Carle was crouching under a horse, nailing a shoe to its hoof, when it happened. The space shuttle roared overhead, creating a sonic boom that startled the 1,100-pound animal. The horse kicked Carle, sending him flying. Although Carle suffered cuts and bruises, those were just minor injuries for a man who's had his ribs broken and toenails sheared by the animals he works with every day. "Anything can send these horses into a kick," said Carle, 48, of Oxnard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1990 | DIANE CALKINS, Diane Calkins is a former reserve officer with the Department of Animal Control
The issue of pound seizure stirred passionate debate for months before the November election. In the end, voters decided, by a huge margin, that the county Department of Animal Control should continue to sell animals "which will die anyway" to UC San Diego for research purposes. With the constant refrain of "they will die anyway" in my ears, I waited for anyone on either side to question why these animals had to die.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | BRIAN ALEXANDER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The practice of selling pound animals for research will continue, but opponents haven't given up the fight. Despite losing the Nov. 6 advisory vote by 68% to 32% on the San Diego County ballot, Proposition C, opponents vow to stop the county's practice of selling pound animals to the University of California, San Diego for scientific research. In fact, the vote has done little to cool passions on either side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1990 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The opposing arguments can get angrily passionate, uttered, as they are, in defense of humane treatment and prolonging life. What makes the debate over Proposition C on the Nov. 6 countywide ballot both painful and compelling is that it seems to pit science against animals that were once pets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1990
I am a cancer patient, I strongly support medical research and I want a cure to be found for my disease. But I do not want to see lost and stray animals sold to UC San Diego School of Medicine or any other research facility. I want to make it clear that the two attitudes are not contradictory. Certainly there are many biomedical institutions in San Diego that do not have contracts with the county (animal) shelter. They are getting along just fine without pound animals for research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1990
Regarding the July 1 Commentary "Should Pound Animals Be Used for Research?": With the 1990-91 contracts, the county Department of Animal Control is, for the first time, reporting to the cities the disposition of the animals picked up in their streets. Why then doesn't the Department of Animal Control require UC San Diego to report on a monthly basis what the pound animals are being used for, exactly what experiments and what protocols? JEANNE NELSON San Diego
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1990 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing number of public officials in North County are voicing opposition to a policy of the county's Department of Animal Control that allows the sale of stray dogs and cats to UC San Diego for medical research.
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