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Pound Seizure

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1990 | DIANE CALKINS, Diane Calkins is a former reserve officer with the Department of Animal Control
The issue of pound seizure stirred passionate debate for months before the November election. In the end, voters decided, by a huge margin, that the county Department of Animal Control should continue to sell animals "which will die anyway" to UC San Diego for research purposes. With the constant refrain of "they will die anyway" in my ears, I waited for anyone on either side to question why these animals had to die.
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NEWS
September 27, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY and VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writers
In fallout from a probe of alleged money-skimming by Sheriff's Department deputies, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge dismissed drug trafficking charges Tuesday against three men, and a prosecutor acknowledged that other narcotics cases may be in jeopardy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
On the battlefield of animal research, vocabulary is a versatile weapon. Researchers use terms like animal "discomfort." They talk of "post-operative analgesia" and "sacrificing" of animal subjects. They stress advances in biomedical research that "enhance and extend" life. They talk of "patients' rights." Their adversaries prefer terms like "pain and suffering" and "psychological trauma." They speak of "sentient creatures" and exploitation of "non-human animals."
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | S.J. GUFFEY, Associated Press
In "Black Beauty," it was easy to line up the sides in the cruelty-to-animals debate. Horses were either humanely treated or they were not. You cared about them or you didn't. Today, in eastern Washington, a small but vocal group of animal-rights activists argues against using dogs and cats from Spokane County Animal Shelter for studies at Washington State University's School of Veterinary Medicine. "There's a lot of emotion here," says Dr. Robert Wilson, dean of the university's vet school. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994 | JULIE FIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal and local authorities in Ventura County have seized $5.8 million in cash and nearly 1,000 pounds of cocaine as part of a three-year nationwide money-laundering and drug-trafficking case targeting major Colombian cartels. The undercover operation, which was based in Ventura County, led to the arrest of one high-ranking member of the Cali cartel and 17 other members of the Cali and Medellin cartels. No details of the arrests were given, nor were the suspects identified.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | BRIAN SKOLOFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On his hands and knees, Sgt. Scott Fraley crawls over boxes of cherries stacked eight high in a refrigerated trailer. His partner, Sammy Brown, a private first-class, talks to the driver of the truck. "You hauling anything illegal? Marijuana . . . cocaine?" Brown asks. "No, sir!" comes a nervous reply. Brown looks the man up and down, watching body language, then directs his eyes toward Fraley, who is holding up a ripe, red cherry in his black-gloved hand.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
In a major victory for the U.S. Customs Service, a federal judge ruled Tuesday that the agency acted properly in seizing 286,000 pounds of a rocket fuel ingredient that was secretly being sent to Iran. At the same time, U.S. District Judge Sim Lake was highly critical of the way the Customs Service and the State Department handled their investigation of the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1990 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing number of public officials in North County are voicing opposition to a policy of the county's Department of Animal Control that allows the sale of stray dogs and cats to UC San Diego for medical research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When authorities raided a Sylmar warehouse a year ago, seizing 21.4 tons of cocaine, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said the drug cache was the largest ever recorded anywhere in the world. But now, as the trial of six defendants charged with stockpiling the cocaine unfolds in a federal courtroom in Los Angeles, authorities say the amount of drugs distributed by the ring was far greater than they had imagined.
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