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Poverty Level

NEWS
November 1, 1998 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 5:30 p.m., time for homework at the Rocha house. Nine-year-old Ruben pulls two wads of paper from his pants pocket, his reading and vocabulary lessons. He sits slumped on a lumpy blue couch flanked by three of his brothers. In another room, Ruben's mother tends to his severely disabled baby brother. His father lies on a bed staring at a wall, depressed after failing to land a job on a nearby street corner as a day laborer.
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BUSINESS
June 30, 2000 | From Reuters
America's longest economic expansion has failed to benefit all workers, as poverty levels among full-time employees have changed little since the early 1970s, a study made public Thursday found. In groundbreaking research that examined poverty among full-time workers, the New York-based Conference Board found that since 1973, even as the work force has expanded, a growing proportion of employees has been touched by poverty.
NEWS
May 4, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children in Orange County, one of the most affluent areas in the U.S., are falling into poverty at a dramatically rapid rate, according to a report released Friday. The Conditions of Children report by a coalition of nonprofit and government agencies said that from 1990 to 1994 the number of poor children increased 73%, from 84,000 to 145,000--almost one-fifth of the youth population.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
Left behind in America's economic expansion, nearly a third of the 20 million families headed by young people who did not attend college live beneath the poverty line, a proportion that has doubled since 1967, a study released Thursday showed. The federal poverty line for a family of four is $11,611. The report, prepared by a private commission on youth and America's future, said that families headed by youths 20 to 24 have experienced a steady 27% decline in median income since 1973.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Data from the 1990 Census was obtained by The Times from computer tapes containing all the socioeconomic data for California taken from the long form survey that was completed by about 17% of the population. The work was conducted by Richard O' Reilly, Times director of computer analysis, and Maureen Lyons, statistical analyst
San Diego County residents make more money, are better educated and are more likely to be employed--especially mothers--than 10 years ago, according to 1990 U.S. Census figures released today. At the same time, housing is less affordable, costing a bigger portion of both homeowners' and renters' incomes; more than one in 10 residents lives below the poverty level, and more than half the female-headed households with preschool children are poverty stricken.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Census Bureau, in a major experimental study released today, found large shifts in the poverty population over short periods of time, with as many as 25% of those who are poor one year no longer in poverty the next. The study, conducted in 1984-85, shows considerable movement of people into as well as out of poverty. For example, one in five people with a poverty-level income in 1985 had not been poor in 1984.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | DAN MORAIN and SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A two-parent family of four needs at least $44,880 a year to make ends meet in California--2 1/2 times the so-called federal poverty level--and one in four of the state's children lives in poverty, separate studies released Tuesday show. A report by the California Budget Project, a liberal nonprofit organization, says that the $44,880 figure assumes the family rents its home and the parents save little or nothing toward retirement or their children's college education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1999 | PAMELA J. JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County supervisors on Tuesday decided to draft a law that would force companies conducting business with the county to pay their employees wages above the federal poverty level. The vote was 4 to 1, with Supervisor Judy Mikels dissenting, mainly because she feared such a law might harm private businesses and prompt all county employees to demand raises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although poor, Southern California's Latinos no longer fit the so-called "poverty-stricken urban underclass" mold defined by the sociologists of the 1960s, the director of UCLA's Chicano Studies Research Center said Thursday. "Latinos are poor, but they are also hard-working and have strong family values," said David E. Hayes-Bautista of UCLA, describing a "Latino paradox" that entraps some who exhibit middle-class behavior and attitudes but still endure poverty-level incomes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1993 | JAMES ZELLERS, James Zellers is president of the 25,000-member Service Employees International Union Local 399.
For most people, Los Angeles is not a good place to live or work. Wages are declining, many benefits have been eliminated and most corporations treat this area as an extension of the Third World. Conscious decisions by employers have led to deindustrialization, subcontracting and union-busting of well-paid private-sector jobs and the privatization of well-paid public sector jobs, which in turn have caused the economic and social crisis facing our community.
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