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Power Grid

NATIONAL
August 22, 2003 | Aaron Zitner, Times Staff Writer
If a major American airline or airport broke away from the air traffic control system and tried to manage flights on its own, the result would be chaos, or worse. But as huge flows of electricity race across the nation's power grid, experts say, they often travel among separate traffic managers who may have little ability to see what's coming -- or to make sure there is adequate capacity to handle the power.
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BUSINESS
June 29, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A third day of soaring temperatures and spiking electricity demand in the West continued to strain the state's power grid Wednesday, sending sparks all the way to the White House. U.S. Energy Secretary Bill Richardson told Congress that he is concerned that California may be hit by more rolling blackouts like the unprecedented power losses that rippled through Northern California on June 14.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Terrorism investigators are examining computer tampering and a bomb threat Monday that led to a lengthy evacuation of the headquarters of an agency that controls most of California's electric transmission system. The incident at the California Independent System Operator in Folsom followed the apparent midnight tampering with computer programs used to buy and sell power on the real-time market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2003 | Eric Bailey and Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writers
Law officers in Northern California and Oregon were on the hunt Wednesday for a portly, gray-bearded man suspected of attempting to topple two electricity transmission towers in what police said smacked of domestic terrorism. Authorities said the man tried to remove large bolts and nuts at the base of the steel structures in an apparent attempt to bring the 115-kilovolt electrical lines crashing down in a high wind.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 109 degrees last June 14, the hottest day in San Jose history--and quite possibly the longest day in the history of SDL Inc. The skyrocketing mercury overtaxed the area's electricity grid, culminating in blown transformers and rolling blackouts in much of the Bay Area. Frenzied SDL managers suddenly found themselves in an odd bucket brigade, feeding diesel fuel into a backup generator five gallons at a time to protect several super-sophisticated devices.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | DAN MORAIN and DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Gov. Gray Davis and legislators grapple with a rescue plan for California's major utilities, the top executive of Edison International indicated for the first time Wednesday that his company may be willing to give up a valuable chunk of property--its massive transmission grid--in exchange for the state's financial help. But Edison Chairman John Bryson said the price would be high--as much as $6 billion, far more than the state apparently wants to pay. "We value the transmission business.
WORLD
September 12, 2004 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
During the 1991 Persian Gulf War, two Tomahawk cruise missiles slammed into the hulking power complex here, leaving dumpster-sized transformers crumpled like balls of tissue paper. The strike crippled Iraq's largest source of electricity, cutting off almost 10% of the country's power supply. It took two months and 23 days for Iraqi engineers to get the plant running again. During last year's war, the U.S.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - In a sprawling complex of laboratories and futuristic gadgets in Golden, Colo., a supercomputer named Peregrine does a quadrillion calculations per second to help scientists figure out how to keep the lights on. Peregrine was turned on this year by the U.S. Energy Department. It has the world's largest "petascale" computing capability. It is the size of a Mack truck. Its job is to figure out how to cope with a risk from something the public generally thinks of as benign - renewable energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2007 | Stuart Silverstein and Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writers
Where it was hot and steamy in Southern California on Wednesday afternoon, it was really hot and steamy. And where it was relatively cool and comfortable, it was pretty darn cool and comfortable for late August. All told, Wednesday's weather yielded an unusually wide temperature divide, a gap of more than 40 degrees between oceanfront and desert.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As California's utilities press a major federal lawsuit against the state to recoup billions in losses, the Senate leader on Friday said he intends to push for state control of the massive electricity transmission system in exchange for helping the utilities avert bankruptcy. Senate President Pro Tem John Burton (D-San Francisco) said that by taking control of the transmission grid, California can hold down costs for consumers while gaining some control over private marketers of electricity.
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