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Power Shortages

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NEWS
October 19, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
In a move intended to avert critical shortages of energy this winter, President Nicolae Ceausescu on Friday ordered nearly half of Romania's electric generating stations placed under military supervision. The use of the military to perform civilian tasks is highly unusual in the Communist-ruled countries of Eastern Europe.
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WORLD
April 17, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
The prospect of power shortages in Japan this summer, of stifling city apartments and manufacturing slowdowns, has divided a country still reeling from the worst nuclear catastrophe since Chernobyl over whether to restart some of its idled reactors. The government contends that the country can't afford not to resume nuclear energy production. The last operating nuclear reactor in Japan, on the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, will be taken off line May 5 for stress tests and safety improvements.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas
Chinese electricity plants are cutting output in the face of soaring coal prices, setting up what could be the worst summer energy crunch in years and threatening to slow the nation's manufacturing sector. State Grid Corp., China's biggest power distributor, has warned that shortages this year could exceed those of 2004, when dry weather cut hydroelectric production, prompting rolling blackouts through much of the country. The current crisis is linked to coal, which fuels most of the nation's electricity plants.
WORLD
August 31, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The machine operators lean back lazily on rolls of cotton fabric, shooing flies from their sweat-soaked tunics as their boss, Abdul Latif, paces between rows of silent electric looms covered in lint. The textile plant owner knows it's just one of several rolling blackouts that will darken his plant today, as they have every day for four years. Along his street, other textile plants have either closed or begun selling their looms for scrap. Latif scrapes by, but the outages have cut his plant's output in half.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
General Electric Co., Bayer and other multinational companies operating in Shanghai are being given top priority by city officials when it comes to their power supplies as the peak summer demand period threatens shortages. Shanghai's power demand may rise as much as 15% from a year ago during this year's peak period, from today to Sept. 17, according to the city government's website.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Kenji Hall and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
The world's third-largest economy faltered Monday, the first full business day since Friday's devastating earthquake, with the Japanese stock market plunging and the country's central bank moving to inject $183 billion into money markets to try to stem the financial damage. Although the quake's fury bypassed Japan's industrial heartland, the shock waves were felt throughout the business sector, from big auto plants to small mom-and-pop establishments. Many of Japan's leading companies, such as Sony Corp.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A popular joke circulating in this capital city these days goes like this: Question: "What is the difference between the country of Kenya and the Titanic?" Answer: "The Titanic went down with its lights on, and there was plenty of water around." As they suffer under stringent power and water rationing, many residents of a country famed for its spectacular wildlife and scenery are angry that the nation seems to be sinking into a black hole.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tennesseans have gained a reputation as legendary hunters and trappers. Their latest quarry: California businesses. In one of the most aggressive efforts yet to capitalize on the Golden State's energy woes, 20 economic development officials from Tennessee descended on Southern California this week to meet with local companies considering a move or an expansion. Californians would be wise to shelve the Beverly Hillbillies jokes. The Tennesseans have come loaded for bear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2000
When will the media, Gov. Gray Davis and the state Legislature wake up? The real reason we have electrical power shortages and rising costs is that we have an insufficient number of power plants. Why don't we remove the roadblocks to the construction of new power plants? If we do not take action soon, the current electrical power problems will just continue to grow. DON SWANSON Lake Forest
SPORTS
July 17, 2000 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
The Angels did a good job manufacturing runs during their recent hot streak, when they won six of seven games, but the assembly line came to a screeching halt in the first six innings Sunday. It was not for lack of raw materials. The Angels put runners on first and second with no outs in the second, a runner on third with no outs in the third, and they loaded the bases with no outs in the fourth. But they could not find the necessary manpower to bring any of those runners home.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas
Chinese electricity plants are cutting output in the face of soaring coal prices, setting up what could be the worst summer energy crunch in years and threatening to slow the nation's manufacturing sector. State Grid Corp., China's biggest power distributor, has warned that shortages this year could exceed those of 2004, when dry weather cut hydroelectric production, prompting rolling blackouts through much of the country. The current crisis is linked to coal, which fuels most of the nation's electricity plants.
WORLD
March 15, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Japanese authorities have begun imposing sporadic power cuts nationwide to make up for production losses and a nuclear power crisis brought on by last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. The rationing in urban areas unaffected by the disasters is necessary, utility officials said, because hospitals in quake-stricken areas have been unable to operate at full capacity to treat those injured in Friday's magnitude 9.0 temblor and the tsunami that inundated the northeast after the quake.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Kenji Hall and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
The world's third-largest economy faltered Monday, the first full business day since Friday's devastating earthquake, with the Japanese stock market plunging and the country's central bank moving to inject $183 billion into money markets to try to stem the financial damage. Although the quake's fury bypassed Japan's industrial heartland, the shock waves were felt throughout the business sector, from big auto plants to small mom-and-pop establishments. Many of Japan's leading companies, such as Sony Corp.
NEWS
July 12, 2009 | Sam Dolnick, Dolnick writes for the Associated Press.
It was still dark outside when a man in his underwear answered the knock at the factory door, releasing a wave of heat and gritty smoke from the noisy room behind him. This, the man was told, was a power raid. The engineers storming past him were here to investigate electricity theft at this basement plastics mill. The problem is rampant in India, but especially in New Delhi, a sprawling city of slums, factories, and politicians unaccustomed to paying for power. When private companies partnered with the government in 2002 to distribute the city's energy, more than half the electricity generated was stolen.
OPINION
September 19, 2008
It's rare to see an initiative attract the diversity of opposition that Proposition 7 has. We're accustomed to measures that are opposed by either the Democratic or Republican parties, for example, but Proposition 7 has been rejected by both.
WORLD
June 15, 2008 | Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
In a narrow store wedged between vendors hawking vegetables and cheap clothing, Adnan Walid lovingly shapes sheets of gold into delicate leaves and flowers to make a necklace. Walid has lost count of the number of friends who have fled the violence of recent years. His own shop was reduced to a charred shell two years ago when a car bomb exploded across the street. He keeps two pistols under his counter, just in case.
SPORTS
July 20, 2007 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
Home runs have never been a significant part of the Angels' approach, but they have been conspicuously absent for one of the longest stretches in franchise history. Thursday marked the 12th consecutive game in which the Angels did not homer, a streak second only to an 18-game drought during the 1976 season. The last Angel to homer was Mike Napoli in the eighth inning July 1 at Baltimore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A power shortage has dimmed downtown's holiday tree. Lighting an evergreen after Thanksgiving has long been a local tradition, but during the last lighting, organizers discovered that the tree had grown too tall and bushy for the supply of lights. More are needed, but a nearby electrical outlet doesn't have enough juice, said Keith Holtaway of the Downtown Assn. The tree-lighting event has been canceled until a solution is found.
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