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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Deutsche-Presse Agentur
Iran has released a group of about 50 "sick and disabled" Iraqi prisoners of war, the official news agency IRNA reported Wednesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Jeremiah Denton, the downed Navy pilot who was paraded before television cameras by the Viet Cong and confirmed U.S. suspicions of prisoner maltreatment during the Vietnam War by blinking out the word "torture" in Morse code, has died. He was 89. Denton, a former U.S. senator from Alabama, died Friday in Virginia Beach, Va. He had been in failing health for several years, a grandson, Edward Denton, said in confirming his death to the Associated Press. From 1965 to 1973, Denton was held at the "Hanoi Hilton" and several other infamous Vietnamese prisons.
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OPINION
November 4, 2003
Re "Another Ambush Hero Enjoys Smaller Spotlight," Nov. 2: Thanks for giving Pfc. Patrick Miller some press. But the fact that the most telegenic former POW, Pfc. Jessica Lynch, is reaping a bounty of fame and fortune rather than Miller highlights the superficiality of our society. Susan Campbell Los Angeles Pfc. Miller's heroism deserves the Medal of Honor. Mike Hatchimonji La Palma
NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A Kuwaiti detainee at Guantanamo Bay is mounting a novel legal challenge to win his release, arguing in a federal lawsuit that he should be freed when U.S. combat troops pull out of Afghanistan because international law stipulates that prisoners of war be returned home once a conflict is over. The lawsuit is the latest attempt in a 12-year struggle by the Odah family of Kuwait to secure the release of a dozen Kuwaiti young men who were captured in Afghanistan after the Sept.
OPINION
February 17, 2005
Re "White House Turns Tables on Former American POWs," Feb. 15: The court awarded a monetary judgment against Iraq and in favor of U.S. military people/POWs who were tortured by Iraq during the Gulf War. The Bush administration has now asked the court to overturn its own judgment. The reason is clear. If a prisoner of war who was tortured has the right to sue the offending nation in a U.S. court, then the Iraqis who have been tortured by the U.S. can sue the U.S. for damages. The U.S. refuses to count or report the number of Iraqi civilians who have been killed by the U.S. -- reported by other sources as being more than 100,000.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter of a century ago, President Richard M. Nixon welcomed them back to the White House, a group of U.S. prisoners from the Vietnam War honored for their dedication and duty in the face of the country's most unpopular war.
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
Melvin Dyson and Ronald Ridgeway have never met, but they share a bond that transcends the 50-year difference in their ages and the distance between their homes in Portland and Houston. At the age of 18, both became military prisoners of war--Dyson in France during World War I and Ridgeway in Vietnam. Dyson was held captive for 3 1/2 months; Ridgeway was believed dead but emerged after 61 months in prison.
NEWS
February 16, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A Brooklyn autograph dealer has bought documents which he says show that Richard M. Nixon, acting as a private citizen, traded gold bullion with Viet Cong soldiers for five American prisoners of war during a secret mission in 1964, it was reported Friday. The sale and other details about the documents was reported in the Pen and Quill, a magazine published by the Universal Autograph Collectors Club. The account included a thank-you note from Nixon to a soldier, Sgt.
NEWS
January 20, 1985 | MOHAMMED SALAM, Associated Press
A hundred Iranian children, captured among the soldiers Iran sent into battle against the Iraqis, have started going to school in their POW camp--a program sponsored by the Baghdad government and two Swiss humanitarian organizations. "Dar, khana, house," 50 young prisoners of war repeated, following the example of their Iraqi teacher during their first class. Dar and khana mean house in Arabic and in Farsi, the language of Iran.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
After battling Pentagon red tape, two U.S. soldiers who were prisoners of war in Yugoslavia this year have been told they can leave the Army. Staff Sgt. Christopher J. Stone of Smith's Creek, Mich., and Spc. Steven Gonzales of Huntsville, Texas, said last week that their resignations were cleared through Army Command in Europe in July. But then the paperwork sat at the Pentagon for 1 1/2 months. Stone, 25, and Gonzales, 22, along with Staff Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2013 | By Matt Stevens and Samantha Schaefer
Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Gantt, whose remains were returned to his widow 63 years after he went missing during the Korean War, will be laid to rest Saturday in Inglewood. An Army honor guard will escort Joseph's widow, Clara Gantt, 94, into the Dwelling Place Foursquare Church around 11 a.m. for an hourlong private service, according to a news release from the USO Greater Los Angeles Area. Mourners will then move to Inglewood Park Cemetery for a public graveside service that will feature a gun salute and full military honors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Gantt told his wife to remarry if he didn't come back from the war. She told him no. He had a hard enough time getting her to say yes. He was it.  For 63 years, the World War II and Korean War veteran was missing in action and presumed dead, but Clara Gantt, 94, held out hope and never remarried. On a cold, dark Friday morning on the Los Angeles International Airport tarmac, the widow stood from her wheelchair and cried as her husband's flag-draped casket arrived home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
The captured fighter pilot had already been through so much at the infamous Hanoi Hilton. He had been beaten up and starved, thrown for months into a dark cell crawling with rats, held immobile with his legs pinned in stocks, and strapped with ropes so tightly that his right arm was torn from its socket. When he passed out from pain, the ropes were briefly loosened until the ordeal could start yet again. Now, with his jailers ordering him to do a propaganda broadcast, J. Robinson Risner, in the solitude of his cell, tried to destroy his voice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Steve Lopez
It was a privilege recently to meet Bernard M. Tuvman, an Army Air Corps waist gunner whose B-17 Flying Fortress was shot down during World War II. Tuvman parachuted from his spiraling aircraft and was held as a POW in Stalag 17 for 20 months before his liberation at the end of the war. And now I'm sorry to report that Tuvman , a long-time resident of West Los Angeles, died this week, at 91, after several weeks of failing health. I met Tuvman at the Home for Heroes hospital at the West L.A. VA, where he had formed a rich friendship with his roomate, Phil Nadler, whose plane was shot down over the Pacific during World War II. Tuvman, who worked for many years as a glazier, and Nadler, an attorney, formed a fast bond, comforting each other as they lay side-by-side in their hospital beds.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Pow! A novel Mo Yan, translated from the Chinese by Howard Goldblatt Seagull Books: 386 pp., $27.50 This year's Nobel laureate in literature is an author who somehow manages to write books with brazenly political themes while living in a dictatorship. Mo Yan's latest novel, "Pow!," is a thinly veiled assault on the frayed moral fabric of that hyper-capitalist country known as Communist China. The characters in "Pow!" do awful and disgusting things, most of them involving meat.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Anne Harnagel, Los Angeles Times staff writer
As we observed Veterans Day , the National WWII Museum in New Orleans unveiled an exhibit chronicling the experiences of the 93,941 American prisoners of war held in the nearly 100 camps or stalags scattered throughout Nazi Germany and German-occupied territory. "Guests of the Third Reich"  highlights the POWs' personal stories and life inside the camps, using oral histories from some of the prisoners themselves. Artifacts on display include a Red Cross aid package, one of more than 27 million shipped to prisoners; a violin made from materials scavenged around Stalag Luft I; and blank books, distributed by the YMCA with colored pencils, filled with drawings, snapshots and poems of camp life.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
Carol Talbot was in the dining room of her Seal Beach Leisure World apartment, working on her book, when she heard the rapid "tat-tat-tat" of gunfire. In an instant, she was crouched in a fetal position beneath the dining room table, covering her ears. For her, it was World War II again. "When I was under the table, I was back in the prison camp," Talbot said. Later, realizing where she was, she got to her feet. Still, the sounds persisted.
NEWS
June 9, 1985 | From United Press International
The Israeli-backed South Lebanon Army seized 24 Finnish members of the U.N. peacekeeping force Friday and threatened to kill them one by one unless Shia Muslims released 11 captive SLA militiamen. The SLA later released two Finnish soldiers. One returned to captivity after relaying a message from his captors. In a separate incident, Austria's ambassador, a U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
"Some time the hating has to stop," reads the last line of "The Railway Man," a moving tale of wartime torture and forgiveness by former British prisoner of war Eric Lomax. Lomax was a British army officer when he was captured by Japanese forces during the fall of Singapore in 1942. The Scotsman endured horrific conditions and savage beatings as he and thousands of others were forced to build the infamous Burma-to-Siam railroad, which formed the basis of the 1957 film "The Bridge on the River Kwai.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman and Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
It was a weekend that made Hollywood stand back and marvel. "The Avengers," from Walt Disney's Marvel Studios, didn't just break the record for the best opening weekend in Hollywood history - the film smashed through it Hulk style, grabbing up big green fistfuls of money. The Joss Whedon-directed movie, riding stellar reviews and a tsunami of Twitter love, piled up $200.3 million at theaters in the U.S. and Canada, according to an estimate from Disney. That total, which beat the $169.2-million record set during the opening weekend of 2011's "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows -- Part 2," was turbocharged by pricier IMAX and 3-D tickets.
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