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OPINION
January 17, 2013
Re "Painful tales of bias in O.C.," Column, Jan. 12 I recently watched "Mississippi Burning" (about the murder of three civil rights activists in 1964), and there's a line in the film spoken by a white character, who says that hate isn't something we're born with, it's taught. As a white person who went to a high school in Los Angeles in the early 1960s that had a majority of black students, I have never understood the judging of people on the basis of skin color. The fact that this ugly and discriminatory behavior by white Americans is still going on in places like Orange County is absolutely appalling.
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NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Reading the latest news out of Arizona on gay rights brings an image to mind: Jim Crow . The Arizona Legislature on Thursday approved a law that would allow a business owner to refuse service to a gay customer if doing so would violate the practice of the owner's religion. So, as our colleague Cindy Carcamo writes from Tucson , a baker could refuse to sell a wedding cake to a gay couple if her faith proscribes homosexuality. Further, a hotel owner with similar beliefs could deny a room to traveling lesbians.
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OPINION
August 1, 2013
Re "Is racial prejudice hard-wired?," Opinion, July 28 Neuroscientist Robert M. Sapolsky hits the nail on the head. Racial prejudice is rooted in behavioral characteristics and neural wiring that are the product of natural selection. Quickly sensing potential danger in one's environment, with other humans forming the major part of that environment, had survival value for our ancestors. We also quickly create categories of things and people and assign values to them. Humans are "groupists" by nature: Our ancestors formed group associations to survive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Kristina Wong has crashed Miss Chinatown pageants as a pimply, cigar-smoking, over-the-hill contestant. She has posed as a rabid Jeremy Lin fan, waving sexually suggestive signs at the NBA player's games. On a sewing machine in her Koreatown apartment, she makes vagina puppets out of colored felt. So when she found herself in front of television cameras discussing the popularity of Asian women on the dating scene, Wong was in her element. "Suck it, white ladies! I got it!
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
With one Mormon leading the pack for the Republican presidential nomination and another scheduled to announce his candidacy on Tuesday, a significant bloc of American voters continues to oppose followers of that religion, according to a Gallup poll released Monday. About one in five Republicans, or 18%, said they would not vote for a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the official name of the Mormon church. About the same proportion of independents said they would oppose a Mormon while a larger number of Democrats, about 27%, said they were opposed, according to the poll.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992
In P. A. Davis' response (April 19) to "Lipstick Liberation" (by Lindsy Van Gelder, March 15), Davis called it absurd to label homosexuality normal, because single-sex couples lack the biological mechanism for procreation. Davis is a prime example of a bigot making a negative value judgment about something he or she does not understand. If Davis had condemned blacks as intellectually inferior, the letter would have been discarded as antiquated prejudice. That it was printed is a reminder of the continuing acceptance of homophobia and heterosexism in this society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1991
My congratulations for two articles (Feb. 3): The first, "Isolation Painful for Partners of Gays in Service," and second, the article on the Mary Magdalene Project--"Special Mission Helps Women Get Off the Streets." Both indicate a concern for presenting factual information about controversial issues and will help overcome prejudice and stereotyping that cause great pain, fear and hatred. Ignorance and fear continue to divide people and cause so much inhuman behavior. As a retired school principal and one who has worked more than four years as a chaplain in the Los Angeles County Jail Unit for Gays, I know firsthand the importance of working for justice and solutions to the problems of crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2009 | SANDY BANKS
I can already envision the hate mail this column will generate. Every time I write about anything involving race, my inbox fills with invective -- racial slurs, rants about the "welfare crowd," suggestions that I stop whining, go back to Africa and turn my "affirmative action job" over to some slighted white person. So I know a bit about how Cambridge, Mass., Police Sgt. James Crowley must have felt when he was insulted by Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
Consider "The Painting," the fourth feature by slow-moving 74-year-old French director Jean-François Laguionie, a twee "Wreck-It Ralph. " Inside a primitive portrait, the subjects are divided into three canvas castes: Sketchies, wraith-like creatures made of pencil lines; Halfies, who were left half-painted; and their snobbish overlords, the Alldunns, who sneer at the incompletes from their castle in the upper left corner of the frame. The metaphors keep coming. When an Alldunn boy falls for a Halfie girl, he insists to his pals that their Creator - the painter - will some day return to set the world right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001
Re "A Consumer Underclass: Scorned Teens," a column on March 18: Daisy Yu sensibly speaks on behalf of all the teens in our society in her article. Using a word such as "underclass" precisely describes a stereotype that some adults may have about minors. As a high school teen, my mind was stimulated by knowing that a college student is taking a potent stand. I have been a victim of this type of prejudice when an employee has followed me in a children's store, suspicious that I would commit an act of theft.
OPINION
August 1, 2013
Re "Is racial prejudice hard-wired?," Opinion, July 28 Neuroscientist Robert M. Sapolsky hits the nail on the head. Racial prejudice is rooted in behavioral characteristics and neural wiring that are the product of natural selection. Quickly sensing potential danger in one's environment, with other humans forming the major part of that environment, had survival value for our ancestors. We also quickly create categories of things and people and assign values to them. Humans are "groupists" by nature: Our ancestors formed group associations to survive.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Who knew Jane Austen could be so polarizing? Caroline Criado-Perez, a freelance journalist and feminist in Britain, led a petition drive that persuaded the Bank of England to put Austen's visage on the back of the new 10-pound note that will be printed in 2017. Criado-Perez had argued, reasonably enough, that at least one piece of paper currency should bear the likeness of a woman not in the royal family (Queen Elizabeth II's face is on the front of all the bills). I mean, the U.S. Treasury put a woman on the ... err, in Canada they have ... oh, never mind.
OPINION
July 28, 2013 | By Robert M. Sapolsky
Reaction to the acquittal of George Zimmerman was just the latest reminder: Race continues to divide us as a species. But why? Are human brains hard-wired to notice and react to racial differences? At first glance, that's precisely what research seems to demonstrate. Some of the most compelling evidence for a hard-wired racial divide concerns a brain region called the amygdala, which plays a central role in processing fear and aggression. If you were put in a brain scanner that identifies levels of activity in different regions and shown a picture of something scary, your amygdala would leap into action, telling your heart to race and your skin to get clammy.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Shan Li
Famed British author Jane Austen is replacing scientist Charles Darwin as the face of the country's £10 note. The Bank of England picked the writer of classics such as "Pride and Prejudice" and "Mansfield Park" to grace the soon-to-be redesigned note, soothing critics who have noted the paucity of women on British currency. An uproar erupted earlier this year after the bank said it planned to put former Prime Minister Winston Churchill on the £5 note, displacing social reformer Elizabeth Fry. Who works the longest?
NATIONAL
July 19, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - In an extraordinary 19-minute soliloquy, President Obama on Friday spoke bluntly and emotionally about his personal experiences with prejudice, the roots of African American skepticism toward the legal system and his optimism about the future of a nation still fractured along racial lines. The comments, in a surprise appearance in the White House briefing room, were Obama's most extensive and personal on race since his election almost five years ago. Obama spoke on the eve of planned national protests over the acquittal of George Zimmerman, who fatally shot Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African American teenager, in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
Consider "The Painting," the fourth feature by slow-moving 74-year-old French director Jean-François Laguionie, a twee "Wreck-It Ralph. " Inside a primitive portrait, the subjects are divided into three canvas castes: Sketchies, wraith-like creatures made of pencil lines; Halfies, who were left half-painted; and their snobbish overlords, the Alldunns, who sneer at the incompletes from their castle in the upper left corner of the frame. The metaphors keep coming. When an Alldunn boy falls for a Halfie girl, he insists to his pals that their Creator - the painter - will some day return to set the world right.
NEWS
November 24, 1985
Allow me to add a postscript to the John Dreyfuss article in the View section Nov. 6, "A Child's Palette of Pre-Prejudice." I applaud Louise Derman-Sparks in her efforts to educate the preschooler in the area of prejudice. But how do you reach the parents, the hard-core racists, who teach their children to discriminate? My child, at the tender age of 3, was told by another 3-year-old that her mother said she could not play with him because he was black. My son was perplexed, and asked me what she meant.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1992
In reference to "It Was Much Too Quiet on 'Malcolm X' Set for Kate Vernon," by Susan King (Off-Centerpiece, Nov. 22): Vernon whines over the way Lee supposedly ostracized her on the set of 'Malcolm X' and how she "never felt part of the process" and couldn't "figure out the psychology of Spike." Welcome to the club! I am sure that African-Americans involved in the business and dealing with white directors and producers go through this humiliation on a much broader scale. This is not to justify prejudices in any way but to make the point that African-Americans are the No. 1 victims of ostracism, and we have never been able to figure out the psychology of white America.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Vincent Kartheiser will swap his sharp suits for ruffles and coattails. The Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis announced that the “Mad Men” star will play Mr. Darcy in its summer production of “Pride and Prejudice.” The adaptation by Simon Reade will begin previews July 6, with an official opening July 12. The limited engagement will run through Aug. 31. Guthrie leader Joe Dowling will direct; no additional casting has been announced....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | Steve Padilla
Like many World War II veterans, he speaks modestly about his service. He is quiet and a polite listener, not the kind to draw attention to himself. But a few months ago, as he visited the National WWII Museum in New Orleans, other veterans noticed his hat emblazoned with his unit's insignia and number. "You see him?" someone asked. "He was in the 442. I've read about them. " Another vet, after spying the hat, walked up to him. "Sir, I just want to shake your hand. " The 442 refers to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, one of the all-Japanese American units that served with distinction in World War II. The unassuming man turning heads was my father-in-law, Tokuji Yoshihashi.
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