Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPremature Births
IN THE NEWS

Premature Births

BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A device manufactured by Tokos Medical Corp. to monitor pregnant women subject to early deliveries at home fails to prevent premature births, costs too much and should never have been approved for routine use, a group of five obstetricians contends. In a report published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, the doctors criticized the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approving the device in September, 1990, without proof that it actually lowers the risk of delivering too early.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cameras clicked Wednesday as Don Shearing took turns holding the tiny hands of his day-old twin daughters, born into the spotlight trained on their 53-year-old mother, who is among the oldest women to give birth. The babies, Kelly Ann and Amy Leigh, were born 12 weeks premature and placed in the neonatal intensive care unit at Martin Luther Hospital in Anaheim. They were listed in guarded condition but doctors said they had an excellent chance of survival.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Pregnant white women who have abnormally low cholesterol levels are 21% more likely to give birth preterm, and both white and black women with low levels give birth to babies who weigh less than other infants of the same gestational age, researchers report today. Obstetricians already knew that women with the highest cholesterol levels are more likely to give birth preterm, but this is the first evidence of risk at the other end of the spectrum, experts said.
HEALTH
November 21, 2005 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
IT'S early morning on the neonatal intensive care unit and Haezxler Galeas -- all 2.2 pounds of her -- is making a fuss. A noiseless fuss, that is. With a ventilator running into her mouth to help her breathe, crying is a feat still above and beyond the capabilities of a baby born four months too soon. Instead Haezxler (pronounced Hasler) squirms, frowns, makes a fist -- and her heart rate and blood pressure tick upward.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | DICK WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emillee Young, born four months ago and way too soon, was back in a hospital incubator recently, resting after eye surgery. Her right eye covered by a patch, her fingernails tinier than bits of confetti, her left leg twitching as if from a dream, she slept. To those who have come to know this baby, she is a miracle. Weighing little more than a pound at birth, Emillee spent her first 108 days at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Bellflower before her mother took her home for a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2000 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight-month-old Ethan Sechrest, the premature baby who weighed just 14 ounces at birth and was small enough to fit in his doctor's cupped hand, died Saturday. "There was nothing more that human hands could do for him," said his father, Alan. Ethan became a media sensation in June when he was allowed to go home from Saddleback Memorial Medical Center. He weighed 3 pounds, 8 ounces at the time, making him one of the smallest premature babies to survive.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | ANDREA HEIMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Melinda Wilson's store is filled with tiny dresses, tiny bottles, tiny shoes, tiny hats and boots, even teeny-tiny tuxedos. The only shop of its kind in Southern California and possibly in the country, the Preemie Store. . .and More offers items created especially for smaller-than-average infants. Although premature or underweight babies make up about 8% of children born in the United States--about 250,000 a year--their needs are virtually ignored in the marketplace.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fifty-one years and four months ago, Jeff Tanksley was lying in a blanket-lined drawer in the glow of a single light bulb, fighting for his life. All 26 1/2 ounces of him. Born three months premature, he created a sensation at Downey Community Hospital, where doctors and nurses--and reporters--hovered over the tiniest infant to be born up to that time in the hospital. They couldn't do much else. It was 1940 and the medical specialty that has come to be called neonatology was unknown.
WORLD
January 17, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Canada's first sextuplets, born more than a week ago, are facing an additional complication to the usual premature baby's struggle for survival: Their parents' religion forbids blood transfusions, a typical part of a preemie's treatment. The babies' condition remains a mystery, and the hospital refuses to confirm reports that one infant has died. The six babies were born Jan. 5 and 6 in Vancouver, British Columbia, to parents who are Jehovah's Witnesses.
HEALTH
January 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
Premature infants on ventilators are getting a tiny dose of morphine at the University of Kentucky Children's Hospital, where doctors say they hope to learn whether the pain medication can improve medical results for their tiniest patients. Ventilators are used for premature infants whose lungs are not sufficiently developed to allow them to breathe on their own. Although adults on ventilators routinely receive pain medication, such treatment generally has not been given to premature infants.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|