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Premier Nikolai I Ryzhkov

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BUSINESS
June 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Soviet Union's new deputy premier, Leonid Abalkin, a reformist now charged with planning economic development, said today there could be no improvement in the country's crisis-ridden economy over the coming year. Abalkin, nominated to the post last week by Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov amid warnings from other economists of looming financial collapse, told the Communist Party newspaper Pravda any hope for a quick turnaround is "groundless illusion."
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NEWS
June 28, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov, bowing to the authority of the Soviet Union's newly strengthened legislature, withdrew six of his ministerial nominees Tuesday after they had been rejected by the committees of lawmakers that had examined their qualifications and proposed programs. Ryzhkov, speaking with reporters after the session of the Supreme Soviet, said that he could not defend these nominees and would propose others in their places. "I agreed actually with the conclusions of the parliamentary committees," he said.
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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Times wire services
Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov agreed today to withdraw the names of six of his Cabinet choices who were not endorsed by legislative committees, marking the first time in Soviet history that a Parliament has rejected high government candidates. Ryzhkov, acknowledging that the revamped Supreme Soviet had turned down nearly half of his proposed 13-member Cabinet, told the newly emboldened lawmakers that he would nominate other people for the senior posts, Tass press agency said. The rejected candidates included two present Cabinet members Ryzhkov had wanted to remain on the job, Culture Minister Vasily Zakharov and Marat Gramov, chairman of the State Committee for Physical Culture and Sports.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Times wire services
Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov agreed today to withdraw the names of six of his Cabinet choices who were not endorsed by legislative committees, marking the first time in Soviet history that a Parliament has rejected high government candidates. Ryzhkov, acknowledging that the revamped Supreme Soviet had turned down nearly half of his proposed 13-member Cabinet, told the newly emboldened lawmakers that he would nominate other people for the senior posts, Tass press agency said. The rejected candidates included two present Cabinet members Ryzhkov had wanted to remain on the job, Culture Minister Vasily Zakharov and Marat Gramov, chairman of the State Committee for Physical Culture and Sports.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov made an emergency trip Monday to the Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan, where rioting initially sparked by ethnic disputes now appears, according to Pravda, to have snowballed into a rampage by a Soviet criminal underworld. "Gangs of bandits, not even masquerading any longer under the guise of 'nationalistic zealots,' are continuing to maraud, rob, burn and murder, not caring which nation's property they pillage," the Communist Party daily newspaper reported.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union faces major political and social unrest on a broad scale within the next two years unless living standards are boosted quickly, the government's top economist warned Friday. Leonid I. Abalkin, who was appointed deputy premier for economic policy a week ago, said that the government is quickly running out of time and that its policies have so far failed to halt the deepening crisis. Should the government's new efforts also fail, he added in one of the most sober warnings here yet on the economic crisis, a sharp political swing to the right could result and bring an end to perestroika, as the current reform program is known.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
In the most far-reaching attempt yet to streamline the top-heavy Soviet bureaucracy, Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov on Saturday proposed elimination of one-third of the government ministries and said the rest should relinquish power to the nation's 15 republics. The shared-rule proposal is a clear attack on the party apparatchiks whom President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has blamed for slowing down, or even blocking, his efforts to reform and streamline the Soviet economy. It also is aimed at easing growing tension in many of the republics, where ethnic leaders have complained about the extent of control Moscow exerts on their daily affairs and have demanded economic independence.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov, bowing to the authority of the Soviet Union's newly strengthened legislature, withdrew six of his ministerial nominees Tuesday after they had been rejected by the committees of lawmakers that had examined their qualifications and proposed programs. Ryzhkov, speaking with reporters after the session of the Supreme Soviet, said that he could not defend these nominees and would propose others in their places. "I agreed actually with the conclusions of the parliamentary committees," he said.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
In the most critical appraisal of the Soviet Union's economy given by the head of the country's government, Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov acknowledged Wednesday that it was so weakened by poor planning and overspending that it had been unable in recent years to raise living standards, ensure the national security and finance further development. Speaking to the Congress of People's Deputies after he was reappointed premier, Ryzhkov, in striking contrast to past Soviet leaders' triumphal declarations of progress, told the country's new legislature that only radical economic reforms, including the introduction of major elements of the free-market forces of supply and demand, could reverse the decline.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | From Reuters
Soviet Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov will make the first official visit to Sweden by a Soviet premier in 20 years on Jan. 11-14 of next year, the Cabinet Office said Friday.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union faces major political and social unrest on a broad scale within the next two years unless living standards are boosted quickly, the government's top economist warned Friday. Leonid I. Abalkin, who was appointed deputy premier for economic policy a week ago, said that the government is quickly running out of time and that its policies have so far failed to halt the deepening crisis. Should the government's new efforts also fail, he added in one of the most sober warnings here yet on the economic crisis, a sharp political swing to the right could result and bring an end to perestroika, as the current reform program is known.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov made an emergency trip Monday to the Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan, where rioting initially sparked by ethnic disputes now appears, according to Pravda, to have snowballed into a rampage by a Soviet criminal underworld. "Gangs of bandits, not even masquerading any longer under the guise of 'nationalistic zealots,' are continuing to maraud, rob, burn and murder, not caring which nation's property they pillage," the Communist Party daily newspaper reported.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Soviet Union's new deputy premier, Leonid Abalkin, a reformist now charged with planning economic development, said today there could be no improvement in the country's crisis-ridden economy over the coming year. Abalkin, nominated to the post last week by Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov amid warnings from other economists of looming financial collapse, told the Communist Party newspaper Pravda any hope for a quick turnaround is "groundless illusion."
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
In the most far-reaching attempt yet to streamline the top-heavy Soviet bureaucracy, Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov on Saturday proposed elimination of one-third of the government ministries and said the rest should relinquish power to the nation's 15 republics. The shared-rule proposal is a clear attack on the party apparatchiks whom President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has blamed for slowing down, or even blocking, his efforts to reform and streamline the Soviet economy. It also is aimed at easing growing tension in many of the republics, where ethnic leaders have complained about the extent of control Moscow exerts on their daily affairs and have demanded economic independence.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
In the most critical appraisal of the Soviet Union's economy given by the head of the country's government, Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov acknowledged Wednesday that it was so weakened by poor planning and overspending that it had been unable in recent years to raise living standards, ensure the national security and finance further development. Speaking to the Congress of People's Deputies after he was reappointed premier, Ryzhkov, in striking contrast to past Soviet leaders' triumphal declarations of progress, told the country's new legislature that only radical economic reforms, including the introduction of major elements of the free-market forces of supply and demand, could reverse the decline.
NEWS
December 3, 1985 | From The Guardian
Zimbabwean Prime Minister Robert Mugabe arrived here Monday at the start of an official visit to the Soviet Union. He was met by Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov and Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze. He is expected to see Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev today.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | United Press International
Soviet Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov returned to Moscow on Friday from an official visit to Finland. In a statement carried by the Tass news agency, the Soviet Union and Finland called for a halt to nuclear testing and warned of the necessity for keeping the arms race from spreading into outer space.
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