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Prenatal Care

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1987
Your articles on the shocking status of prenatal care for the poor people of this county indicate a sickening disregard for the health and lives of those unfortunate mothers and their babies. Of course, much of the blame can be placed on the poor themselves, but I think a good share of the problem can be laid on the penurious policies of our governor, and the unholy alliance of Supervisors Deane Dana, Pete Schabarum and Mike Antonovich. The county always seems to have millions of dollars to spend on land swaps and assorted give-aways, but is always short when it comes to funding health care for the indigent.
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NEWS
June 12, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pete Wilson's tenure as governor may well close without implementation of one of his most dogged pursuits: the end of state-subsidized care for tens of thousands of pregnant illegal immigrants. That is the prospect facing the lame-duck governor after a unanimous California Supreme Court ruling issued Wednesday that spurned Wilson's latest effort to ban impoverished undocumented women from receiving state-funded prenatal care.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting next week, California authorities plan to notify tens of thousands of pregnant women and their health care providers that the state will eliminate prenatal care to illegal immigrants on Dec. 1 under terms of the new federal welfare law. In papers filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, the Wilson administration declared that emergency regulations implementing the cutoff will be released as soon as today, and notices to 70,000 pregnant women statewide may begin going out Nov. 1.
NEWS
November 2, 1996 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson, renewing his drive to cut state benefits to illegal immigrants, proposed emergency regulations Friday to deny prenatal services each year to an estimated 70,000 pregnant women who are undocumented immigrants. Widely criticized by health care advocates, Wilson's action signals the end of a program approved by the Legislature in 1988 that has provided state-subsidized pregnancy checkups and other prenatal care for poor women who are illegal immigrants.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | ERIN J. AUBRY
A new follow-up care project for infants takes Great Beginnings for Black Babies' prenatal educational programs a logical step further. Thanks to a windfall of county health department funds, the Crenshaw-based nonprofit agency has implemented a childhood immunization and infant services program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors next week will consider a plan to persuade obstetricians to accept Medi-Cal patients by helping the doctors cut red tape and by doing the billing for them. The proposal for a public-private Perinatal Provider Network was developed by Supervisors Leon Williams and Brian Bilbray, after the full board approved the concept in May 1989. The final plan has been placed on the supervisors' agenda for consideration next Tuesday.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a time--just a few decades ago--when pregnancy was considered relatively dangerous. Today, because of improved medical care, a woman's risk of serious complications or death during pregnancy and delivery is extremely low. Nevertheless, one serious problem continues to plague pregnant women and obstetricians: preeclampsia. During the last decade, the rate of preeclampsia has increased by nearly one-third, and the condition currently affects about 8% of all pregnancies.
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