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Preservation Hall Jazz Band

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Musical fashion has known radical changes in the past few decades, but the song remains the same--stubbornly, proudly the same--for the Preservation Hall Jazz Band. Since the group formed in 1961, it has championed the jubilant sound of seminal New Orleans jazz, which is approaching its centennial as a genre. Its predictability is a source of comfort and a reminder of the timelessness of certain musical idioms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
In the aftermath of Tuesday's celebrations of Mardi Gras, “CBS Sunday Morning With Charles Osgood” on Sunday profiles the city's bastion of traditional music, Preservation Hall , and the venerable venue's namesake jazz band. The segment includes an interview with bassist/tuba player Benjamin Jaffe, son of Preservation Hall founders Allan and Sandra Jaffe, the couple that turned what had been an art gallery into a home for musicians who still championed the style of jazz that developed in the early 20th century, most famously by native son Louis Armstrong.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New Orleans' image as the cradle of jazz is based upon impressive historical fact. The breakthrough, genre-establishing efforts of everyone from Buddy Bolden and King Oliver to Jelly Roll Morton and Louis Armstrong firmly established the Crescent City as the source from which the music flowed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2012 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Like jazz itself, the drummer Lumar LeBlanc was born in the city of New Orleans. And like a lot of musicians there, he played in the traditional brass-band style that originated in the 1920s and '30s, favoring familiar marches and ballads. "Like 'When the Saints Go Marching In' and '(What a) Wonderful World,'" LeBlanc says now. "But being young, we heard things on the radio, like Public Enemy and other rap music. We would sneak in some of these tunes. We found audiences were captivated by these funky beats and these newer sounds … played on a snare drum, a bass drum, a sousaphone, two trumpets, a saxophone and two trombones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the day the New Orleans Mardi Gras celebration reached its climactic frenzy earlier this week, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, that cornerstone of New Orleans music, was starting its day in . . . Cedar City, Utah? "We're on our way to Salt Lake City," said trumpeter Wendell Brunious, leader of this particular Preservation Hall band (there are three), in an early-morning phone interview before the group's bus headed north. The current tour--with stops in Tempe and Sun City, Ariz.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2001
8pm Jazz Ken Burns' "Jazz" series devoted generous attention to the raw, straight-from-the-heart brand of jazz that Louis Armstrong, King Oliver and others developed in New Orleans in the early part of the 20th century. The style is still embraced at Preservation Hall in the Crescent City. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band returns for another of its foot-stamping performances in Irvine.* Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Drive. 8 p.m. $26 to $32. (949) 854-4646.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
In its continuing crusade to perpetuate New Orleans jazz, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band--with its mix of young and old players--provided a convincing case at UCLA's Wadsworth Hall for the past and present value of this collectively improvised music. This particular ensemble, perhaps the best of the various Preservation Hall groups, featured on Friday night a number of top musicians, particularly in the front line of horns, with leader Wendell Brunious a standout on trumpet.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
New Orleans musicians often write about tragedies and the BP oil spill is no exception. These are just a small sample of the jazz, bluegrass, rap and other songs New Orleans musicians wrote about the spill. Nobody knows nothin' . Written by John Boutte, Bill Lynn and Paul Sanchez. Featuring the Preservation Hall Jazz Band with Clint Maedgen and Threadhead Records artists John Boutté, Paul Sanchez, Susan Cowsill, Craig Klein, and Margie Perez Ain't My Fault. with Mos Def', Lenny Kravitz, Trombone Shorty, Tim Robbins, Preservation Hall Jazz Band Sorry Ain't Enough No More by Shamarr Allen, Dee-1, Paul Sanchez, & Bennie of Hot 8 Sportsman's Paradise by Ramblin' Letters Sweet Crude Blues by John Bagnato Hey Tony!
NEWS
July 8, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Think of New Orleans jazz as the first rock 'n' roll. Bursting into public consciousness in the post-World War I years, it was the soundtrack for the Jazz Age, the irresistible, foot-tapping accompaniment for the cultural transformation known as the Roaring '20s. And it's never really gone away. Sure, there were moments of eclipse -- the Swing Era, rock, disco, hip-hop, rap -- but New Orleans jazz never disappeared.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989
Trad, Dixieland, New Orleans and related older jazz forms are more uplifting, fun and consistent with the upbeat spirit of the American experience than so much of the later, dissonant, brooding jazz that draws inspiration from poppy pods and Colombian agriculture. Trad-oriented jazz societies are deeply aware of, and grateful for, the black invention of jazz a century ago. Apart from the elderly members of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, there are practically no blacks learning, playing or interested in listening to classic jazz, and outreach efforts by clubs like ours fall flat.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2011 | Christopher Smith
Talk to Woody Allen and he'll go out of his way to tell you what a crummy musician he is, and yet, for the past half-century or so, his innumerable live performances likely have introduced New Orleans-style jazz to more audiences in America and Europe than anyone outside of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band. The renowned filmmaker's enthusiasm for his hobby animated a recent phone chat that found the 76-year-old passionate in discussing topics as varied as the artist he'd most like to have played with and his dogged determination to practice at all hours.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Ben Jaffe, the tuba player and creative director for the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, was sitting in his Faubourg Marigny house one spring morning, drinking fresh-brewed New Orleans chicory coffee and worrying about the oil spill. He and music producer Bill Lynn had just watched oil executives blame one another for the Deepwater Horizon rig disaster, and Jaffe, who comes from a long line of jazz musicians, was sick of it. He glanced over at a glum Lynn, and as if by instinct, they started riffing on a standard New Orleans tune, "It Ain't My Fault."
NATIONAL
July 29, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
New Orleans musicians often write about tragedies and the BP oil spill is no exception. These are just a small sample of the jazz, bluegrass, rap and other songs New Orleans musicians wrote about the spill. Nobody knows nothin' . Written by John Boutte, Bill Lynn and Paul Sanchez. Featuring the Preservation Hall Jazz Band with Clint Maedgen and Threadhead Records artists John Boutté, Paul Sanchez, Susan Cowsill, Craig Klein, and Margie Perez Ain't My Fault. with Mos Def', Lenny Kravitz, Trombone Shorty, Tim Robbins, Preservation Hall Jazz Band Sorry Ain't Enough No More by Shamarr Allen, Dee-1, Paul Sanchez, & Bennie of Hot 8 Sportsman's Paradise by Ramblin' Letters Sweet Crude Blues by John Bagnato Hey Tony!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Trumpeter John Brunious, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band's leader and the senior member of the New Orleans ensemble, died Tuesday after an apparent heart attack in Orlando, Fla., where he had been living since Hurricane Katrina. He was 67. A native of New Orleans who had a striking physical presence with a full head of white hair and a white mustache, Brunious began his career at the famous French Quarter music spot in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2008 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
The Blind Boys of Alabama "Down in New Orleans" (Time Life) * * * 1/2 The former president isn't the only Jimmy Carter who's done some work for Habitat for Humanity. Another gentleman with the same name visited the organization's New Orleans Musicians' Village last year with some associates to help rebuild that hurricane-devastated city -- though not with the usual tools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Narvin Kimball, 97, the last founding member of New Orleans' Preservation Hall Jazz Band, who was known for his vocal stylings and banjo playing, died Friday at his daughters' home in Charleston, S.C. He and his wife, Lillian, had been staying there since shortly after Hurricane Katrina. Kimball's vocal renditions of "Georgia on My Mind" always brought standing ovations, said hall director Ben Jaffe, whose parents founded Preservation Hall in 1961.
NEWS
February 23, 2006 | Don Heckman
New Orleans, the wounded birthplace of jazz, will be saluted during the 28th annual Playboy Jazz Festival June 17 and 18 at the Hollywood Bowl. The survival and recovery of the Crescent City will be celebrated in a joint performance by Elvis Costello & the Impostors with Allen Toussaint and his New Orleans Horn Section. .
NEWS
February 23, 2006 | Don Heckman
New Orleans, the wounded birthplace of jazz, will be saluted during the 28th annual Playboy Jazz Festival June 17 and 18 at the Hollywood Bowl. The survival and recovery of the Crescent City will be celebrated in a joint performance by Elvis Costello & the Impostors with Allen Toussaint and his New Orleans Horn Section. .
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