Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPresident Corazon Aquino
IN THE NEWS

President Corazon Aquino

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | from Times Wire Services
Philippine jets and helicopters on Saturday blasted suspected military rebels battling President Corazon Aquino's forces for a second day in the strongest bid yet to topple her administration. Aquino told rebel soldiers Saturday to "surrender or die," saying there would be no negotiation with leaders of the abortive attempt to overthrow her.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Corazon Aquino endorsed former Defense Secretary Fidel Ramos today as her successor in an announcement expected to set off a mad round of politicking before the May 11 election. Ramos, a 63-year-old West Point graduate, helped lead the 1986 uprising that toppled his cousin, the late President Ferdinand E. Marcos, and propelled Aquino to power. As chief of staff and defense secretary, Ramos stood by Aquino through seven coup attempts.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | Reuters
President Corazon Aquino said Tuesday that Manila wants further talks with the United States on the future status of Clark Air Base and Subic Bay Naval Base, whose lease expires in September, even though leading Philippine legislators had urged her to abandon the deadlocked negotiations.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aquino Wants U.S. Base to Be Free Port: President Corazon Aquino has suggested turning Subic Bay Naval Base into a Hong Kong-style free port to cushion the impact on the economy of a U.S. military pullout. The base, a U.S. Seventh Fleet repair yard and ammunitions depot, could be "the nucleus of a growth center" in the Philippines, she said. Aquino said she has ordered a government panel to study ways of converting the 14,400-acre base from military to commercial use.
NEWS
February 26, 1988
A homemade bomb injured 14 people near an outdoor stage in Manila during celebrations marking the second anniversary of the revolt that ousted President Ferdinand E. Marcos and brought President Corazon Aquino to power. Police said no one claimed responsibility. Most of the injured suffered minor cuts from flying debris. The blast occurred on the highway where two years ago thousands of Filipinos shielded troops who mutinied against Marcos after a fraud-tainted election.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | Associated Press
The United States gave 10 more helicopters to the Philippines on Friday to help the nation fight an 18-year-old Communist insurgency. Maj. Gen. Charles Teeter, commander of the Joint U.S. Military Advisory Group, said the UH-1 "Hueys" were a "tangible symbol of strong U.S. support . . . (for President Corazon Aquino) and for the democracy of the Philippines."
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Despite repeated assurances that she would not run again, President Corazon Aquino is consulting with other political leaders about seeking a second term, her brother said Tuesday. Rep. Jose Cojuangco's comments came as Aquino met with 19 politicians from central and northern Luzon. Afterward, the governor of Abra province, Vicente Valera, told reporters that the politicians assured Aquino they would support her for reelection.
NEWS
September 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 3,000 residents of Olongapo outside the Subic Bay Naval Base demonstrated against the Philippine senators who voted to close the U.S.-run installation. In Manila, President Corazon Aquino appealed to the Senate to give U.S. troops sufficient time to withdraw, saying that a sudden pullout would displace thousands of Filipinos working at Subic and worsen the sufferings of communities around the base. On Sept.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Corazon Aquino backed away from a confrontation with the Senate over U.S. bases in the Philippines. Aquino, facing mounting opposition to her efforts to keep U.S. forces here in defiance of a Senate decision to evict them, said in a statement that she will abandon her plan for a referendum on retaining American forces if it fails to win public support.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | Reuters
President Corazon Aquino said Tuesday that Manila wants further talks with the United States on the future status of Clark Air Base and Subic Bay Naval Base, whose lease expires in September, even though leading Philippine legislators had urged her to abandon the deadlocked negotiations.
NEWS
February 11, 1991 | From Associated Press
President Corazon Aquino testified in a libel trial today that her credibility as national leader was damaged by a newspaper column that said she hid under her bed during a 1987 coup attempt. The president, who has survived seven rebel uprisings in her five years in office, said she supports press freedom. But she said it carries a "very serious responsibility" for truth.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eduardo (Danding) Cojuangco Jr. was the king of cronies. Under his friend and mentor, Ferdinand E. Marcos, Cojuangco amassed $1.5 billion in corporate assets through illegal monopolies and massive fraud, prosecutors say. And although it was never proved, President Corazon Aquino reportedly suspected her long-estranged cousin of a role in the 1983 assassination of her husband, Benigno S. Aquino Jr.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His troops were on alert, his vacation plans ruined, and the strain of nightly false alarms showed on his face. But the brigadier general laughed as he put down his phone. "That was my third newspaper call today," he told his visitor. "Everyone wants to know if the coup has started."
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Leaders of both houses of the Philippines Congress urged President Corazon Aquino today to reverse herself and let Imelda Marcos come home after her acquittal in New York on charges of looting the nation's treasury. But Aquino refused to relax the ban and accused Marcos of supporting a coup attempt in December. The president found herself politically isolated, with longtime supporters joining Marcos loyalists in calling for the former First Lady's return.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|