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President Roh Tae Woo

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NEWS
March 21, 1989
South Korean dissidents said they will fight to oust President Roh Tae Woo, who has indefinitely postponed a promised national referendum on his performance. The main dissident alliance, the United National Democratic Movement, demanded that Roh stop "fooling the people" on the referendum issue and said it will push for his resignation.
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NEWS
September 30, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government announced amnesty for seven tycoons, including the chairmen of the Samsung and Daewoo groups, convicted of bribing former President Roh Tae Woo. The amnesty had been expected, since the seven heads of family-controlled conglomerates received suspended sentences of between 1 1/2 years and 2 1/2 years and had not been imprisoned. The clemency order, which goes into effect Saturday, will also benefit 16 other executives convicted of tax evasion, embezzlement or bribery.
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NEWS
December 21, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hunger-striking former President Chun Doo Hwan was moved from prison to a hospital early today, but he will still be indicted this afternoon on charges stemming from a 1979 mutiny, authorities said. Former President Roh Tae Woo, already on trial for bribery in connection with a $653-million slush fund he accumulated during his 1988-93 term in office, will also be indicted in connection with the mutiny, South Korean media reported.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
President Roh Tae Woo fired his defense minister and the powerful chief of military intelligence following allegations that the government spied on more than 1,300 civilians. Roh's office said that Defense Minister Lee Sang Hoon was replaced by Lee Jong Koo, former army chief of staff. Lt. Gen. Cho Nam Pung gave way as commander of the Defense Security Command in favor of Lt. Gen. Koo Chang Hoe.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
Kim Young Sam on Thursday will take over as South Korea's first civilian president since 1961 in an inauguration ceremony that, unlike earlier spectacles staged as displays of overseas support for authoritarian rulers, will include no foreign leaders as guests. Kim, a former opposition leader who joined forces with outgoing President Roh Tae Woo in 1990, is expected to quickly name a prime minister and a Cabinet.
OPINION
April 21, 1991 | WILLIAM E. ODOM, William E. Odom, director of the National Security Agency from 1985 to 1988, is director of national security studies at the Hudson Institute, Alexandria, Va.
The implications of improved Soviet relations with South Korea, not Japan, are the big story from Mikhail Gorbachev's recent visit to the region. If South Korea succeeds in undermining Soviet support for North Korea, outcomes that could resonate throughout Asia are possible. Gorbachev's failure to advance Soviet-Japanese relations dramatically during his unprecedented visit to Tokyo is not surprising, though some voices have tried to make it into a sign of Gorbachev's decline.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Hankyoreh Shinmun was established in May, 1988, no one doubted that it would become a strong anti-Establishment voice--if the government permitted it to survive. More than 60 of its initial 144 reporters had been purged from journalism in 1975 and 1980 by President Roh Tae Woo's predecessors. Thirty others quit jobs at established newspapers and took pay cuts of more than 50% in exchange for the greater freedom that the Hankyoreh paper promised.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Thursday promised a new era of partnership with Seoul--and improved legal rights for Koreans living in Japan--at the end of two days of talks with Korean officials. In his first visit here since becoming prime minister in 1989, Kaifu said his talks with President Roh Tae Woo had laid the basis for a "future-oriented, friendly relationship" between the nations, whose relations are still strained by the memory of more than 30 years of brutal Japanese rule.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A smiling Yoon Yong Wan, 29, adjusted his 20-month-old son's trousers while his wife packed away the baby's milk bottle as they prepared to leave Seoul's Olympic Stadium to the strains of the 1988 Games' theme song, "Hand In Hand." "I was quite moved," said Yoon, a shopkeeper, who had taken the afternoon off to see the South Korean national soccer team beat North Korea's team, 1-0, before an enthusiastic crowd of nearly 80,000 fans.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
President Roh Tae Woo fired his defense minister and the powerful chief of military intelligence following allegations that the government spied on more than 1,300 civilians. Roh's office said that Defense Minister Lee Sang Hoon was replaced by Lee Jong Koo, former army chief of staff. Lt. Gen. Cho Nam Pung gave way as commander of the Defense Security Command in favor of Lt. Gen. Koo Chang Hoe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1990
Rep. Thomas Foglietta's column ("Korea Uses Reunification to Hide Its Own Repression," Commentary, July 27) concerning the domestic and foreign policies of the Republic of Korea was an unconscionable mix of half-truths, lies and unwarranted conclusions. I not only take issue with the conclusions he draws, but would like to point out a number of inaccuracies. 1) He specifically suggests that the government's efforts to ease tensions with North Korea are aimed at diverting attention from domestic problems.
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