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Presidential Aides

NEWS
December 31, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If you were just a little bit better boy," Bill Clinton's grandmother used to tell him when he was growing up, "you could be a preacher." The President has told the story often, adding with a mischievous grin that he chose politics instead because he knew he could never stay entirely out of trouble. In fact, politics and preaching are kindred professions.
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NEWS
November 7, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two years, President Clinton asked voters to judge him by his ability to move legislation through Congress. His pollster, Stanley B. Greenberg, even developed a hypothesis that the ability to master Congress might be for presidents in the post-Cold War period the kind of litmus test of strength that mastering the Soviets was for presidents from Harry S. Truman through Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
The chief of staff George Bush chose to give his White House a "refreshing new perspective" is a brainy political brawler, a squat bulldog of a man whose intellectual brilliance and flying temper alternately have thrilled and rattled Statehouse veterans and voters alike in the tiny arena of New Hampshire. To fill a job usually thought to require the negotiating finesse of a Washington insider and the calming instincts of a behind-the-scenes conciliator, Bush on Thursday tapped New Hampshire Gov.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department on Wednesday fired two Clinton Administration appointees who are under investigation by the Justice Department in connection with the disclosure of information from the personnel files of former George Bush Administration officials.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House briefing room was full. At the podium, two senior Administration officials were outlining for the press corps the President's controversial new policy on gays in the military. The briefing was detailed and helpful. Officially, it was also tentative because it came four days before the Administration would formally announce its intention to ease the ban on homosexuals in the services.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North wore six glittering rows of ribbons on his Marine Corps uniform Tuesday--plus a badge denoting service on the staff of the President, the job from which he was fired last November for his part in the diversion of Iranian arms profits to the Nicaraguan contras.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Bush on Friday named a new deputy chief of staff and gave a senior White House job to the wife of a Republican political operative who has criticized Bush for breaking his "no new taxes" promise. W. Henson Moore, a former Republican congressman from Louisiana, was appointed as Bush's No. 2 staff aide, directly under Chief of Staff Samuel K. Skinner. Since 1989, Moore has been the Energy Department's deputy secretary. He succeeds Andrew H. Card Jr.
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eileen McGann, the wife of former presidential aide Dick Morris, confirmed reports that she has decided to leave him, citing ceaseless public pressure since he was accused of being a regular customer of a $200-an-hour prostitute. The scandal surfaced in August with a report about the relationship between Morris, 48, and prostitute Sherry Rowlands, who sold her story to a supermarket tabloid. Morris immediately resigned.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
In the optimistic glow of President Bush's inauguration week, Secretary of State James A. Baker III confidently told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that he intended "to hit the ground running--instead of just hitting the ground." It hasn't worked that way. Six weeks after Baker's confirmation, his own aides acknowledge that their first steps on the job have looked more like running in place.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
Most high-level White House aides believed that President Reagan was so depressed, inept and inattentive in the wake of disclosures about the Iran-Contra scandal early in 1987 that the possibility of invoking the 25th Amendment to remove him from office was raised in a memo to Howard H. Baker Jr., then Reagan's chief of staff.
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