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NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley said he would halt early voting in his largely Democratic state on Monday but President Obama's reelection campaign says they don't yet assume that Hurricane Sandy will significantly disrupt their voter turnout operations in critical swing states. In the most closely contested states, Democrats are pinning hopes on Obama's get-out-the-vote efforts to tip the scales on election day. The president's campaign has been building volunteer networks for months and even years in some areas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Zeituni Onyango, an aunt of President Obama whose bid for asylum in the United States received national attention during her nephew's first campaign for the presidency and contributed to the debate over illegal immigration, died Tuesday in Boston. She was 61. Onyango had been treated in recent months for cancer and respiratory problems, said Cleveland attorney Margaret Wong, who represented Onyango in her immigration case. A half sister of Obama's late father, Onyango moved from Kenya to the U.S. in 2000.
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NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Tom Hamburger
With the deadline for filing presidential fundraising reports hours away Thursday, officials from nearly every campaign predicted a relatively low dollar total compared with the historic highs at this time in the 2008 campaign cycle. Campaign aides were engaged in the traditional ritual of spinning their tally as a show of firm support, blaming fundraising challenges on circumstances outside their control and certainly not a reflection on their candidate. Still, the slumping tally was notable in the camp of former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, the GOP frontrunner in polls and fundraising.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Greg Whiteley's random access memories documentary, "Mitt," available on Netflix and being shown at a Pasadena theater, is a viewing experience both familiar and strange. As a private glimpse inside the swirl that began with the former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's 2008 primary run to be the Republican presidential nominee (losing to John McCain) and concluding with his 2012 status as an also-ran, "Mitt" feels like the kind of behind-the-scenes campaign doc that's eager to clue us in on how candidates function day in and day out. There's Romney in hotel suites hashing out strategy with his family while cracking jokes, tidying the room, playfully arguing, weathering setbacks and staying optimistic in the face of defeat.
WORLD
February 25, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
The competition for the Iranian presidency has begun in unusual haste, with the candidates trading sharp barbs four months before a crucial election that hinges on the state of the economy and probably will influence the Islamic Republic's relations with the United States. Former President Mohammad Khatami, a relative liberal who announced his candidacy this month, has come out swinging against his main rival, incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2012 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
TAMPA, Fla. - No state is more crucial to Mitt Romney's chances of winning the White House than Florida, and no issue here is more important than the economy. That dynamic played out recently when Vice President Joe Biden came to the perennial electoral vote battleground to promote the Obama administration's environmental record by riding an airboat through the Everglades. The Romney camp responded with a stinging assault on President Obama's "failed" economic policies. The targets: a Florida jobless rate that exceeds the national average, painfully high gasoline prices, rising healthcare costs and one of the worst housing collapses in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Before the era of the 24-hour news cycle and weekly televised debates, the predominant and most creative outlet for presidential candidates to communicate their vision was the campaign poster. With "Presidential Campaign Posters" (Quirk Books), the Library of Congress takes a look back at two centuries of memorable election art. The book begins with the 1828 Andrew Jackson / John Quincy Adams race, spanning through 2008's Barack Obama / John McCain battle - including Shepard Fairey's memorable Obama "Hope" poster - and covering every campaign in between.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2012 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
DES MOINES - A decade ago, strategist Karl Rove launched the Republican Party's 72-hour plan: a massive door-knocking and phone effort in the final three days before the election that helped generate victories in 2002 and 2004. Early voting this year has rendered Rove's idea obsolete. Ballots have landed on kitchen tables in North Carolina, where two-thirds or more of the vote will probably be cast early. In-person voting starts Thursday in Iowa, a swing state where election season has assumed biblical proportions: 40 days and nights leading up to Nov. 6. Before this month is out, 30 states will be voting.
NEWS
October 18, 1995
Hyman B. Raskin, 86, top executive in national presidential campaigns for two decades. A native of Sioux City, Iowa, Raskin earned his law degree at Kent College of Law in Chicago. He served in government administrative capacities, including head of the Illinois regional Office of Price Stabilization.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2004 | DAVID SHAW
I was a college sophomore during the Cuban missile crisis, and I can still remember walking across the UCLA campus with a friend, both of us singing "Once Was the Time of Man" and wondering if the world was about to blow itself to smithereens. But I can think of no time in my life -- not then, not amid the race riots and other civil unrest later that decade, not during Watergate, not after the stock market crash of 1987 -- when I worried as much about the future of our country as I do today.
OPINION
January 22, 2014 | Doyle McManus
"Poverty is not some rare disease from which the rest of us are all immune," a leading American politician said last week. "It is but the worst strain of a widespread disease otherwise known as economic insecurity. Most families worry about making ends meet. " That must have been President Obama or some other Democrat, right? Wrong. It was Rep. Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), Mitt Romney's former running mate and the Republicans' chief budget-cutter on Capitol Hill. Up to now, his most famous statement about the social safety net was that it risked becoming "a hammock that lulls able-bodied people to lives of dependency and complacency.
WORLD
November 23, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras - A new party is challenging the business and political establishment that has ruled Honduras since civilian government took charge a generation ago. And its candidate is the wife of a former president deposed by those interests in a 2009 coup, a dramatic throwback to years past. One of her opponents is the military general who overthrew her husband. Such are politics in Honduras, a longtime U.S. ally that has emerged as the prime symbol of an increasingly violent, dysfunctional Central America and now stands as the main transshipment point for Colombian cocaine headed for the United States.
OPINION
September 25, 2013 | Doyle McManus
So, will Hillary Rodham Clinton run for president? In an interview with New York Magazine published this week, the former secretary of State acknowledged that she's wrestling with the idea but still needs time "to weigh what the factors are" before "making a decision one way or the other. " While Clinton is weighing factors, her supporters are building a campaign operation. A group called "Ready for Hillary" has collected more than 1 million Facebook "likes" and compiled preemptive endorsements from a long list of national figures, including Bill Clinton campaign veteran James Carville, civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2013
Berthold Beitz Industrialist honored for saving Jews during WWII Berthold Beitz, 99, who was honored for saving hundreds of Jews in occupied Poland during World War II and became one of postwar West Germany's leading industrialists, died Tuesday. Steelmaker ThyssenKrupp, where he was the honorary chairman of the supervisory board, announced his death but gave no further details. Beitz and his wife, Else, were honored by Germany's main Jewish group in 2000 for saving hundreds of Jewish workers at an oil field he managed in occupied Poland from deportation to Nazi death camps.
OPINION
December 12, 2012 | DOYLE McMANUS
Shortly after the 1988 presidential election, pollsters asked Democrats whom they favored to be their party's nominee in 1992. The strongest candidates were Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Gov. Mario M. Cuomo of New York. The governor of Arkansas, Bill Clinton, didn't even register. Eight years ago, after another election, the pollsters tried again. The front-runners for the 2008 Democratic nomination, they found, were Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and John F. Kerry. The newly elected senator from Illinois, Barack Obama, wasn't on the list.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Obama for America provided a hint Wednesday of what its post-campaign role may be, sending supporters an email promoting the president's stance on the fiscal cliff and encouraging recipients to spread the White House's message. “Your voice and action helped reelect President Obama,” the email declares. It  thanked everyone for their support and responded to what the group says has been a persistent request: “Keeping you informed about how the president is fighting for you so you can continue to talk to your friends, family and neighbors.” Detailing Obama's plan for dealing with the fiscal cliff, the email lists the proposal to extend tax cuts for 98% of Americans and 97% of small businesses, ending the tax cuts for the top 2% of Americans and more than $3 trillion in cuts.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
LAS VEGAS - In three days of campaign travel this last week, President Obama spent just two hours on the soil of a battleground state - a small fraction of his time given that voters in those places are expected to decide the election. Instead, Obama rubbed elbows with wealthy donors in New York City, San Francisco and Los Angeles. They hadn't shelled out $20,000 apiece just to cheer and watch him from a distance at a big rally. For years, the complaint in donor-rich states, including New York, Illinois and California, has been that presidential candidates take them for granted and seldom show up to campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1992
It took President Bush's reelection campaign five days to decide that it had better distance itself from Newt Gingrich's repellent comments linking Woody Allen to the Democratic Party's platform. Five minutes should have been enough. Gingrich, the House Republican whip and honorary co-chairman of the Bush campaign in Georgia, suggested last Saturday that Allen's highly publicized relationship with the adopted daughter of a former lover falls right in line with the Democratic platform.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
CHICAGO - Early on election day, in two tight, tucked-away rooms at Obama headquarters known as the Cave and the Alley, the campaign's data-crunching team awaited the nation's first results, from Dixville Notch, a New Hampshire hamlet that traditionally votes at midnight. Dixville Notch split 5-5. It did not seem an auspicious outcome for the president. But for the math geeks and data wizards who spent more than a year devising sophisticated models to predict which voters would back the president, Dixville Notch was a victory.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
You know all that talk about how Superstorm Sandy will revivify efforts in Washington to address climate change? Write it down somewhere, because a few days or weeks from now it will be forgotten. So will concerns about income inequality, and pledges to protect Social Security and Medicare from harm. They may be heading to the back burner after having only momentarily made it to the front. These predictions are based on these issues' weight in the recent presidential campaign, which is barely any weight at all. Both candidates tirelessly reminded us that this election was "important," but the most important issues at stake for individual voters, for business and for the economy at large flitted by in their stump speeches and the three debates faster than you can say "attention span.
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