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OPINION
October 23, 2012
Re "U.S. can't link Libya attack to Al Qaeda," Oct. 20 I'm more than disappointed that we have another intelligence failure to deal with. Our national interests have been ill served by an armed attack that no one saw coming. The loss of a good man, Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, will hurt our efforts in Libya. Worst of all, we have the Republicans playing "gotcha" politics, jumping the shark on every rumor to call President Obama a liar. They've even convinced Mitt Romney, who I believe to be a somewhat honest man, to join in. Will the Republicans pay the price for being so badly wrong?
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OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
A few years ago, I found myself sitting on an airplane next to a gentleman from Egypt. Talk quickly turned to the upheaval in his country, where the so-called Arab Spring was in full bloom. "We want a real democracy," he told me, "not like yours. " When I pressed him to elaborate, he shot back with a question of his own. "How many times have you voted," he asked, "when someone named 'Bush' or 'Clinton' wasn't running?" The answer, I sheepishly admitted, was once: in 2008. Before that - going back to 1980, the first year I cast a ballot - every single presidential ticket featured someone from one of those two families.
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NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Two hundred years before the contested election of 2000, another contested election pitted a sitting vice president against a president running for a second term, for the only time in U.S. history. I'm talking, of course, about Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. One of the ironies of that election, though, is that when it was finally resolved in the House of Representatives, the decision was between Jefferson and Aaron Burr. That's because, in the early days of the republic, presidential voting involved double balloting, in which members of the electoral college selected two candidates; as a result, Jefferson and Burr, who was running to be vice president, ended up with the same number of electoral votes.
WORLD
February 2, 2014 | By David Willman, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON - Hillary Rodham Clinton is backing President Obama's opposition to new economic sanctions against Iran. Obama announced in his State of the Union address last week that he would veto any legislation that called for such sanctions, as negotiations to extend an interim nuclear weapons agreement proceed. Some prominent Republicans support new sanctions. Clinton, the former secretary of State and presumed early frontrunner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, detailed her position in a Jan. 26 letter to the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Democrat Carl Levin of Michigan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1992
Why can't the campaign for the presidency get beyond the level of Harts and Flowers? JOHN E. NUGENT, El Cajon
OPINION
October 16, 2011 | By Paul Waldman
If you've been following the Republican presidential primaries, you've undoubtedly taken in that Rick Perry grew up in the tiny Texas town of Paint Creek. Perry's rural upbringing is a staple of his rhetoric; he often describes his hardscrabble beginnings, how his family didn't have indoor plumbing until he was 5, and how he absorbed the values embraced by the good folks of Paint Creek. The biography page on his website is titled "From a Place Called Paint Creek. " Journalists pick up the theme too: The New York Times, CBS News and Bloomberg News have run stories profiling the town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988
Poor George. He'll never learn. He thinks that suddenly (and oh so conveniently) springing forth with a child-care proposal will woo us into forgetting his condescending positions on issues that are paramount to women. He thinks we'll forget that he doesn't support a woman's right to control her own body, and therefore her own destiny. He thinks we'll forget that he doesn't support absolute equal rights for women under the law. Wrong, George. We won't forget. BARBARA MARTINEZ North Orange County NOW Santa Ana
OPINION
November 12, 2000 | Joseph Hanania, Joseph Hanania, who lives in Santa Monica, writes frequently about TV and minority issues
Never has presidential political advertising been so clean, so informative, so devoid of personal attacks. Never has it brought so many voters into the political process, making the country more democratic than ever. And we can thank TV for this. So says Kathleen Hall Jamieson, dean of the Annenberg School for Communications at the University of Pennsylvania and author of "Everything You Think You Know About Politics . . . And Why You're Wrong."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1988 | CLARKE TAYLOR
In an effort to provide comprehensive coverage of the 1988 presidential campaign, the Public Broadcasting Service is planning a six-week prime-time series this fall. "There's a general sense within public television that the horse-race aspect of the election is well-covered by the commercial networks, but that viewers also need to know more about the presidency and the issues," said Stephen Atlas, executive producer for public affairs at WGBH-TV in Boston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2013 | Times wire services
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Richard Ben Cramer, whose narrative nonfiction spanned presidential politics and the game of baseball, has died. He was 62. Cramer died Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore of complications from lung cancer, said his agent, Philippa Brophy. He won the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting from the Middle East while working as a foreign correspondent for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Cramer's other notable work included a bestselling biography of New York Yankees great Joe DiMaggio, an influential magazine profile of another baseball star, Ted Williams, and a critically acclaimed, behind-the-scenes account of the 1988 U.S. presidential race, "What It Takes: The Way to the White House.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
If the last week has taught us anything, it's the power, and limitations, of political narrative. First, there was Hurricane Sandy, which brought climate change back into the presidential race - and led to an essential photo op: President Obama clasping the arm of Chris Christie, New Jersey's Republican governor. Then there was the Romney campaign's attempt to “expand the map” by staging rallies in Pennsylvania, a state in which most polls put Obama comfortably ahead. Over the weekend, surrogates for both candidates sparred over whether Obama might be slipping or Romney's shift was a desperate act of political sleight-of-hand.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By James Rainey
It would have seemed inconceivable even a week ago that President Obama and  New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie would find common cause. But there they were Wednesday afternoon, thrown together by Hurricane Sandy, touring the storm-beaten Garden State and looking like the sort of nonpartisan leaders Americans want in a crisis. Doubtless determined to avoid political gestures, political questions and political inferences throughout their joint appearance, the pair of new buddies stood to gain just that - maximum political advantage.
OPINION
October 23, 2012
Re "U.S. can't link Libya attack to Al Qaeda," Oct. 20 I'm more than disappointed that we have another intelligence failure to deal with. Our national interests have been ill served by an armed attack that no one saw coming. The loss of a good man, Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, will hurt our efforts in Libya. Worst of all, we have the Republicans playing "gotcha" politics, jumping the shark on every rumor to call President Obama a liar. They've even convinced Mitt Romney, who I believe to be a somewhat honest man, to join in. Will the Republicans pay the price for being so badly wrong?
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Two hundred years before the contested election of 2000, another contested election pitted a sitting vice president against a president running for a second term, for the only time in U.S. history. I'm talking, of course, about Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. One of the ironies of that election, though, is that when it was finally resolved in the House of Representatives, the decision was between Jefferson and Aaron Burr. That's because, in the early days of the republic, presidential voting involved double balloting, in which members of the electoral college selected two candidates; as a result, Jefferson and Burr, who was running to be vice president, ended up with the same number of electoral votes.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
What would Norman Mailer have made of Clint Eastwood ? I've been thinking about that these last few days, as we shift from one national nominating convention to another, as Tampa yields to Charlotte and the great miniseries of presidential politics continues its inexorable passage toward Election Day. Mailer , after all, is the big daddy of participatory political reporting, spiritual godfather of Hunter Thompson, Timothy Crouse and Matt...
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
CINCINNATI, Ohio - In this battleground state that has seen wedge issues enter into presidential politics in the past, this election year lacks such a sideshow. In 2004, many believed a ballot measure outlawing gay marriage played an important role in helping President George W. Bush win Ohio, a bellwether state in most presidential elections. No Republican has won the White House without winning Ohio. In a squeaker, Bush beat Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry with a 2.1 percentage point margin of victory, or 118,775 votes out of nearly 5.6 million cast.
OPINION
December 29, 2011 | Meghan Daum
Surely you've heard the story about Mitt Romney's dog. If you haven't, just wait. The more desperate the GOP primary campaign gets, the more likely you are to hear it again. In 1983, a 36-year-old Romney and his wife and five young boys piled into the family station wagon for a 12-hour drive from Boston to Lake Huron in Canada. As was the custom, Seamus, their Irish setter, rode in a crate strapped to the top of the car. Somewhere along the way, the dog began to experience, shall we say, digestive trouble that made its presence known via, uh, streaks on the back windshield.
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