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Presidential Task Force On Los Angeles Recovery

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NEWS
November 1, 1992 | ELSTON CARR and JAKE DOHERTY
The Presidential Task Force on Los Angeles Recovery has opened "neighborhood opportunity centers" in Pico-Union and Mid-Wilshire to offer services ranging from small-business loans to consumer protection information. David Beightol, executive director of the task force, said opening the center is part of the federal government's effort to foster long-term economic development in the area. Through small business loans, "the goal is to bring growth opportunity to the city," he said.
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NEWS
November 1, 1992 | ELSTON CARR and JAKE DOHERTY
The Presidential Task Force on Los Angeles Recovery has opened "neighborhood opportunity centers" in Pico-Union and Mid-Wilshire to offer services ranging from small-business loans to consumer protection information. David Beightol, executive director of the task force, said opening the center is part of the federal government's effort to foster long-term economic development in the area. Through small business loans, "the goal is to bring growth opportunity to the city," he said.
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NEWS
October 25, 1992 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The Crenshaw Neighborhood Opportunity Center will open Wednesday as part of post-riot efforts by the Presidential Task Force on Los Angeles Recovery to fund neighborhood business ventures. A public-private partnership of corporations, business leaders, celebrities and other investors has raised $50 million to help the growth of small businesses and joint ventures in the area, said Jim Whitehead, a task force official. Whitehead said the center hopes to generate $1 billion for area businesses.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | JAKE DOHERTY
Two surveys of Korean-American merchants whose businesses were damaged in the spring riots have found that financial and administrative difficulties continue to hamper rebuilding efforts. The Korean-American Inter-Agency Council, a consortium of community groups organized to aid riot victims, last week released the results of a telephone survey of 322 of the more than 2,000 Korean-American merchants and their families whose businesses were destroyed or damaged in the riots.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid the handful of shops scattered through Compton's half-vacant transit mall, one storefront holds the federal government's latest hope for combatting the urban ills that erupted into last spring's civil unrest. A small sign in the window reads "Neighborhood Opportunity Center." Inside, brochures and pamphlets describing federal aid programs cover a few battered tables.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1992 | MILES CORWIN, TIME STAFF WRITER
Federal officials are no longer considering relocating a military enlistment station out of South Los Angeles and now say they are committed to rebuilding the facility, which burned down during the riots, in the area. Department of Defense officials had considered rebuilding outside the city, partly because they considered the area too dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling President Bush's key post-riot initiative outdated and divisive, a City Council committee Thursday rejected funding for the anti-crime component of the Weed and Seed program, putting in jeopardy $18 million in social service funding targeted at riot-stricken areas.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Neighborhood Opportunity Center that opened Wednesday in the Crenshaw District, one of the areas hardest hit by last spring's rioting, will put its money where its mouth is, organizers said. The center is one of four opened citywide by the Presidential Task Force on Los Angeles Recovery to help business owners through the maze of bureaucratic hurdles that often hector new business enterprises.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidential task force dispatched to Los Angeles in the wake of the riots has sent President Bush a long-term strategy for federal support, but the plan is being criticized as not nearly ambitious enough to play a meaningful role in recovery efforts. The six-point action plan calls for the creation of one-stop government assistance centers, military-run "career academies" for at-risk youth and special incentives for small-business investment in the inner city.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials were bewildered recently when Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp, visiting one of Los Angeles' poorest housing projects, announced that the city would be receiving $137 million in federal funds to help recover from the riots. Was this, they wondered, some unexpected--but welcome--new grant that no one had bothered to tell them about? After studying the numbers more closely, officials concluded that the HUD chief had engaged in a little creative accounting.
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