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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Arden Hayes is 5. He loves Legos and running so fast across the living room to flip onto the couch that his feet end up pointing at the ceiling. He also loves the presidents - especially 11 and 33. Arden knows all 44 U.S. presidents. In order. Ask him who was 29 and right away he'll say Warren G. Harding. As for 11 (James K. Polk) and 33 (Harry S. Truman), they're his favorites, he says, because "they're dark-horse candidates. " Also, Polk got us California, which happens to be Arden's home.
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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama used his executive power and a hot-button issue to try to stoke support from a key election-year constituency Tuesday, as he issued two directives aimed at ensuring federal contractors pay women as much as men for equal work. Surrounding himself with female supporters at the White House, Obama signed an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about how much money they make. Advocates say secrecy about salaries is a major contributor to the gap in average pay between male and female workers in the United States, which the White House says means women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. The president also ordered contractors to report data to the government showing the compensation paid to employees by gender and race.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1994
Final irony: Recent U.S. presidents have been so bad, even Richard Milhous Nixon looks good! BILL DAVIS Los Angeles
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
OPINION
August 30, 2012
Re "A warmer Romney," Aug. 28 The president is not our buddy. So why is likability the biggest factor in whom Americans elect? Mitt Romney and Barack Obama aren't running for class president. Don't we want someone who is smart and focused, someone who can't be bought, someone whom we can respect even if we don't necessarily "like" him? I'm not suggesting either candidate necessarily is that man; I'm just saying "warm and fuzzy" is not what I'm looking for in a president, so I don't really care what Ann Romney has to say about Mitt the husband, father and grandfather.
OPINION
August 19, 2010 | By Andrew J. Bacevich
Fifty years ago this summer, with Americans riveted by a presidential contest pitting John F. Kennedy against Richard M. Nixon, Dwight D. Eisenhower contemplated his departure from the White House. As he prepared to retire from public life, Ike sketched out the ideas that would inform his celebrated farewell address, presciently warning against the dangers of a military-industrial complex. Simultaneously, he was plotting ways to overthrow the Cuban government. Eisenhower did not remain in office long enough to implement the plan that his minions hatched.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2012 | By Richard Simon
With ex-presidents earning hundreds of thousands of dollars in speaking fees and book deals, a bipartisan effort is underway in Congress to scale back taxpayer support for well-to-do former occupants of the Oval Office.   The Presidential Allowance Modernization Act seeks to amend a half-century-old law that sought to "maintain the dignity” of the office of the president. The proposal would provide a taxpayer supported pension of $200,000, about the same amount that they now receive.
OPINION
March 29, 2011 | By Michael Kinsley
It really couldn't be clearer. "The Congress shall have power … to declare war. " Yet these are probably the most egregiously ignored words in the Constitution. You would think that Republicans, especially, with their showy fondness for "originalism" and "plain meaning" in interpreting the Constitution, would have no problem interpreting the meaning of these words: If a president wants to go to war, he must get the approval of Congress. Presidents of both parties traditionally ignore the congressional war power when they feel like it. Or they wait until the troops are poised for battle — putting Congress in an impossible position — before asking permission.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Rev. Billy Graham, one of the nation's most famous evangelists whose ministry tended to presidents and paupers, has been taken to a hospital for observation in Asheville, N.C., his spokesman said Wednesday. Graham, who celebrated his 95th birthday on Nov. 7 at a party with guests including Donald Trump and Sarah Palin, went to the hospital Tuesday and is expected to released soon, his spokesman said. “Billy Graham is in the hospital with a respiratory congestion issue, similar to what he had a few weeks ago. As was the case then, we expect he will be able to return home in a day or two,” Mark DeMoss, a family spokesman, said in a statement emailed to reporters.
OPINION
October 28, 2012 | By Craig Fehrman
For months (and months and months), presidential candidates have subjected themselves to relentless stumping, repetitive fundraising and vicious public scrutiny. They've endured far too many fact-checks, eaten far too many swing-state delicacies, kissed far too many swing-state infants. They've made promises no one could keep and gaffes no one could believe. Even with the exit polls now in sight, it's enough to make any sane person pause and wonder: Why would anyone run for president?
OPINION
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy Garton Ash
BEIJING - President Xi Jinping is leading an extraordinary political experiment in China. In essence, he is trying to turn his nation into an advanced economy and three-dimensional superpower, drawing on the energies of capitalism, patriotism and Chinese traditions, yet all still under the control of what remains, at its core, a Leninist party-state. He may be a Chinese emperor, but he is also a Leninist emperor. This is the most surprising and important political experiment on Earth.
WORLD
April 4, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - Officials at Venezuela's largest university called on President Nicolas Maduro on Friday to help protect students after masked pro-government vigilantes attacked a peaceful gathering on campus and injured seven people. Victor Marquez, president of the faculty association at the Central University of Venezuela in Caracas, said the attack Thursday on a group of about 1,200 students was carried out by men armed with metal pipes and wooden rods as national guard members stood by. Witnesses said the assailants also had pistols, but no shots were fired.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Don Lee
TAIPEI, Taiwan - For decades, relations between Taiwan and its giant neighbor China have been one of the great success stories of the ending of the Cold War. Slowly but surely, the two nations have pulled back from half a century of bellicose confrontation and in recent years embraced a level of political and economic cooperation that seemed to promise new riches for both. But today, for many Taiwanese, the bloom is off the rose. This disenchantment lay behind the outbreak of angry protests from Taiwanese students that are in their third week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
Andre Birotte Jr., the chief federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, has been nominated by President Obama to serve as a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, the White House announced Thursday. Birotte, who has served as the U.S. attorney overseeing the nation's second-largest office since 2010, is a former Los Angeles County deputy public defender who also acted as the Los Angeles Police Department's inspector general for six years. As L.A.'s top federal prosecutor, he reinstated a public corruption and civil rights unit disbanded by his predecessor and oversaw high-profile investigations into the L.A. County jails and into state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
The union that represents Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies has gone from two presidents to none. A judge has stepped into the battle for control of the Assn. for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, ruling that it will have no leader until a court hearing April 17. Instead, decisions will be made by a three-person committee, including one member from each of the union's competing factions and a longtime staffer considered relatively neutral. Last month, newly elected president Armando Macias was ousted and a different president installed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Cindy Chang and Robert Faturechi
A high-stakes power struggle at the union representing Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies has left members with two presidents, two boards of directors, two "official" websites and, for many, too much drama. Trouble at the Assn. for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs came to light last month when the board ousted Armando Macias, its newly elected president, citing his poor attendance. The board installed a new president, but Macias is refusing to recognize the ouster. Now the two sides are accusing each other of illegitimate power grabs and misusing union funds.
OPINION
September 19, 2012 | Doyle McManus
It's one of Mitt Romney's favorite lines: America needs a businessman in the White House. It's "a basic qualification" for the job, he said in his speech at the Republican convention last month, "one that's essential to [the] task. " But what does history tell us? Have our greatest presidents come from the ranks of industry and commerce? Not by any means. INTERACTIVE: Battleground states Of the three presidents generally ranked the greatest - George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Franklin D. Roosevelt - only Washington had real business experience, and that was as an 18th century plantation owner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
Arden Hayes is 5. He loves Legos and doing flips onto the living room couch. He also loves our nation's presidents. He knows all 44 in order and can tell you something about any one of them. Arden knows a lot about the presidents because he reads a lot. He's been reading since before he turned 2. He recently surprised his parents by reciting the Gettysburg Address word for word. When I wrote about Arden Hayes in Sunday's paper, some readers wondered how the newspaper came to find out about him. In fact, Times photographer Mel Melcon was the first person to notice Arden, when Melcon went to the Nixon Library to cover the opening of a new exhibit.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - When prominent Latino activists meet with President Obama, there's one White House staff member present whom many of them have known since she was a child. Julie Chavez Rodriguez grew up handing out leaflets and knocking on doors with her grandfather, Cesar Chavez, whose campaign to organize farmworkers still inspires today's Latino leaders. As deputy director of the Office of Public Engagement, Rodriguez runs Obama's organizing efforts in support of immigration reform and supervises Latino outreach.
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto says a proposed new telecommunications law would finally break up Mexico's powerful and much-criticized TV and telephone monopolies. The proposal and other reforms have generated considerable praise abroad for Peña Nieto and his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which ruled the country for seven decades before a 12-year hiatus and a return to power in late 2012. But a growing number of domestic critics are reading the fine print of the telecommunications plan and finding many things to worry about.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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