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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1994
Final irony: Recent U.S. presidents have been so bad, even Richard Milhous Nixon looks good! BILL DAVIS Los Angeles
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NEWS
April 14, 2014
Russ Newton joined The Times in 2000 as director of operations and president at California Community News, one of the Times wholly-owned business units. Before joining The Times, he was director of operations from 1998 to 2000 at Landoll Inc., a Tribune Education company. Previously, he led the packaging department at the Orlando Sentinel in Orlando, Fla., from 1994 to 1998, and the production division, press and packaging areas at the Daily Press in Newport News, Va., from 1987 to 1994.  Newton joined Tribune Co. in 1985, serving as a shift supervisor, crew supervisor and trainer at the Chicago Tribune from 1985 to 1987.
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OPINION
August 30, 2012
Re "A warmer Romney," Aug. 28 The president is not our buddy. So why is likability the biggest factor in whom Americans elect? Mitt Romney and Barack Obama aren't running for class president. Don't we want someone who is smart and focused, someone who can't be bought, someone whom we can respect even if we don't necessarily "like" him? I'm not suggesting either candidate necessarily is that man; I'm just saying "warm and fuzzy" is not what I'm looking for in a president, so I don't really care what Ann Romney has to say about Mitt the husband, father and grandfather.
WORLD
April 13, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Paul Richter
MOSCOW - Vowing that the Russian takeover of Crimea would not be repeated elsewhere in the east of his country, Ukraine's interim president gave separatists until Monday to lay down their arms and surrender government buildings they have seized or face a crackdown by military forces. Those separatists who don't fire on security forces and who surrender their weapons will not be prosecuted, President Oleksandr Turchynov said Sunday. "The Council of National Security and Defense has decided to carry out a large-scale anti-terrorist operation with the use of armed forces of Ukraine," Turchynov said in a televised address Sunday afternoon.
OPINION
August 19, 2010 | By Andrew J. Bacevich
Fifty years ago this summer, with Americans riveted by a presidential contest pitting John F. Kennedy against Richard M. Nixon, Dwight D. Eisenhower contemplated his departure from the White House. As he prepared to retire from public life, Ike sketched out the ideas that would inform his celebrated farewell address, presciently warning against the dangers of a military-industrial complex. Simultaneously, he was plotting ways to overthrow the Cuban government. Eisenhower did not remain in office long enough to implement the plan that his minions hatched.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2012 | By Richard Simon
With ex-presidents earning hundreds of thousands of dollars in speaking fees and book deals, a bipartisan effort is underway in Congress to scale back taxpayer support for well-to-do former occupants of the Oval Office.   The Presidential Allowance Modernization Act seeks to amend a half-century-old law that sought to "maintain the dignity” of the office of the president. The proposal would provide a taxpayer supported pension of $200,000, about the same amount that they now receive.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Rev. Billy Graham, one of the nation's most famous evangelists whose ministry tended to presidents and paupers, has been taken to a hospital for observation in Asheville, N.C., his spokesman said Wednesday. Graham, who celebrated his 95th birthday on Nov. 7 at a party with guests including Donald Trump and Sarah Palin, went to the hospital Tuesday and is expected to released soon, his spokesman said. “Billy Graham is in the hospital with a respiratory congestion issue, similar to what he had a few weeks ago. As was the case then, we expect he will be able to return home in a day or two,” Mark DeMoss, a family spokesman, said in a statement emailed to reporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Arden Hayes is 5. He loves Legos and running so fast across the living room to flip onto the couch that his feet end up pointing at the ceiling. He also loves the presidents - especially 11 and 33. Arden knows all 44 U.S. presidents. In order. Ask him who was 29 and right away he'll say Warren G. Harding. As for 11 (James K. Polk) and 33 (Harry S. Truman), they're his favorites, he says, because "they're dark-horse candidates. " Also, Polk got us California, which happens to be Arden's home.
OPINION
September 19, 2012 | Doyle McManus
It's one of Mitt Romney's favorite lines: America needs a businessman in the White House. It's "a basic qualification" for the job, he said in his speech at the Republican convention last month, "one that's essential to [the] task. " But what does history tell us? Have our greatest presidents come from the ranks of industry and commerce? Not by any means. INTERACTIVE: Battleground states Of the three presidents generally ranked the greatest - George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Franklin D. Roosevelt - only Washington had real business experience, and that was as an 18th century plantation owner.
OPINION
March 29, 2011 | By Michael Kinsley
It really couldn't be clearer. "The Congress shall have power … to declare war. " Yet these are probably the most egregiously ignored words in the Constitution. You would think that Republicans, especially, with their showy fondness for "originalism" and "plain meaning" in interpreting the Constitution, would have no problem interpreting the meaning of these words: If a president wants to go to war, he must get the approval of Congress. Presidents of both parties traditionally ignore the congressional war power when they feel like it. Or they wait until the troops are poised for battle — putting Congress in an impossible position — before asking permission.
WORLD
April 12, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian President Vladimir Putin has massed tens of thousands of troops along Ukraine's eastern border, a reminder of his vow to protect ethnic Russians in the neighboring country. Using his army, however, is probably Plan B. Rather than repeating the "Crimean scenario" - invading, seizing and annexing territory - the Kremlin would prefer to keep Ukraine weak and divided by forcing a change in how it is governed, analysts say. Increasing regional autonomy at the expense of the central government would force Ukrainian authorities to constantly balance competing visions of the country to hold it together, and in effect give Moscow veto power through its influence among ethnic Russians in the east.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Today, the image would have gone viral in an instant: The president of the United States, dripping wet in swim trunks before a throng of excited beachgoers, trading a look and a laugh with an attractive woman in a polka-dot bikini. But well before the Internet's relentless rationing of spontaneous fame, the 1962 photo of President Kennedy at Santa Monica's beach made quite a splash. For a Los Angeles woman named Eva Ban, its effect lasted a lifetime. Ban was the woman in the two-piece swimsuit, which was called a bikini in news accounts but was modest by today's standards.
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - A marathon meeting between President Nicolas Maduro and opposition leaders that ended early Friday kept alive the possibility of a compromise between the two sides to halt Venezuela's slide toward anarchy. Maduro hosted 11 opposition leaders Thursday night at the Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, the capital, and the political foes leveled bitter accusations. Each blamed the other for the violence that has left 41 people dead and more than 1,000 injured since February.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Kathleen Sebelius, who helped guide the rocky and controversial rollout of President Obama's landmark healthcare law, is stepping down as Health and Human Services secretary after about five years, according to a senior administration official. In her place, the president plans to nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget. Sebelius was not pressured to resign, according to the administration official. But she leaves after presiding over the disastrous launch of the health law's new online insurance marketplaces last fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By David Zahniser
The panel charged with looking into sexual harassment claims against Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar has completed its work and forwarded its findings to Council President Herb Wesson. News that the probe is finished comes as the City Council on Friday is scheduled to consider a contract authorizing up to $200,000 in payments to the law firm representing Huizar in a lawsuit filed by his accuser, former Deputy Chief of Staff Francine Godoy. The report, which council members are expected to consider behind closed doors, was prepared by Batza & Associates, an investigative firm that specializes in workplace matters.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama used his executive power and a hot-button issue to try to stoke support from a key election-year constituency Tuesday, as he issued two directives aimed at ensuring federal contractors pay women as much as men for equal work. Surrounding himself with female supporters at the White House, Obama signed an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about how much money they make. Advocates say secrecy about salaries is a major contributor to the gap in average pay between male and female workers in the United States, which the White House says means women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. The president also ordered contractors to report data to the government showing the compensation paid to employees by gender and race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
Arden Hayes is 5. He loves Legos and doing flips onto the living room couch. He also loves our nation's presidents. He knows all 44 in order and can tell you something about any one of them. Arden knows a lot about the presidents because he reads a lot. He's been reading since before he turned 2. He recently surprised his parents by reciting the Gettysburg Address word for word. When I wrote about Arden Hayes in Sunday's paper, some readers wondered how the newspaper came to find out about him. In fact, Times photographer Mel Melcon was the first person to notice Arden, when Melcon went to the Nixon Library to cover the opening of a new exhibit.
NEWS
August 19, 1991
THE JOB: The office of president was established for the first time by the Third Congress of People's Deputies in March, 1990. The president, under the Soviet constitution, Article 127, is the "head of the Soviet state." The president is elected by universal, direct and secret ballot. ELIGIBILITY: Any Soviet citizen between the ages of 35 and 65 may be elected to the post for a maximum of two five-year terms.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
OPINION
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy Garton Ash
BEIJING - President Xi Jinping is leading an extraordinary political experiment in China. In essence, he is trying to turn his nation into an advanced economy and three-dimensional superpower, drawing on the energies of capitalism, patriotism and Chinese traditions, yet all still under the control of what remains, at its core, a Leninist party-state. He may be a Chinese emperor, but he is also a Leninist emperor. This is the most surprising and important political experiment on Earth.
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