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Press Freedom

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1988 | SALLY CHEW, Sally Chew is an associate of the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists and the editor of its Backgrounder reports. and
Advocates of press freedom have been watching an alarming trend in Mexico. At least 24 Mexican journalists have been killed during the past six years, and no more than five assailants in these cases have been convicted. And last Friday a Mexican television cameraman, who had worked for Cable News Network, was shot and seriously wounded in Mexico City.
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NEWS
November 19, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a decision that may signal new willingness to limit press freedom, the Supreme Court on Sunday refused to allow Cable News Network to broadcast government-recorded phone calls between deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega and his lawyers. The high court on a 7-2 vote let stand an order by a judge in Miami requiring CNN to turn over the tapes to him for his examination. The Supreme Court has never formally upheld an order barring the publication or broadcast of news and information.
WORLD
July 20, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Blaming a "deliberate, strategic" campaign of harassment by the Venezuelan government against the nation's news media, the Inter-American Press Assn. said Wednesday that the climate of press freedom and free speech has "deteriorated sharply" in recent years. The statement came after a delegation headed by IAPA President Diana Daniels of the Washington Post visited the offices of the Correo del Caroni, a newspaper in Ciudad Guayana.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 2:25 a.m. and a tense silence filled the Moscow News building in Pushkin Square. As she looked out the window, Yevgenia Albats saw Soviet tanks rumbling to a halt. Any second she expected armed soldiers to burst through the newsroom doors, arresting her and two other female reporters inside. There was still time to flee. But Albats had a better idea. "I went through my editor's desk and found a bottle of Armenian cognac," she says with a chuckle. "And we three women drank.
WORLD
February 19, 2004 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
By Bush administration standards, the president's words stung. Sitting beside Tunisia's strongman leader in the Oval Office on Wednesday, President Bush said he looked forward to discussing "the need to have a press corps that is vibrant and free, as well as an open political process." Although those words might sound mild, human rights advocates said they marked a watershed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Martin Rubin
After Mandela The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa Douglas Foster Liveright: 608 pp., $35 What a pleasant surprise to encounter a book that actually looks beyond the surface of South Africa's by now well-known story. We've read so many accounts of the miraculous transformation of the hideous apartheid state into the rainbow democracy and, in the nearly two decades since that happened, of the flies in the ointment that have marred the fairy tale.
NEWS
November 19, 1985 | United Press International
About 15,000 employees of 500 newspapers and periodicals went on a 24-hour strike Monday for higher pay and greater press freedom. The strike began after negotiations with the government broke down.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | Times researcher Ann Griffith
Press freedom is limited by drug lords in Colombia, who threaten journalists and last year murdered five reporters; by Islamic codes in Saudi Arabia, where it is illegal to manufacture, import, sell or use satellite dishes; and by government decree in the United Kingdom, where the coverage of selected subjects and people is forbidden. A ban in Northern Ireland on broadcasting direct interviews with 11 organizations was ended last month.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | From Times wire services
Chinese news organizations were told today to forget about press freedom and concentrate on "correct" Marxist ideas, signaling a further crackdown on liberal thinking. The People's Daily, the Communist Party newspaper, accused a "small group of thugs" of using the ideal of freedom of the press to confuse their readers, "cook up rumors and instigate attacks on the party and the people" during the May-June pro-democracy protests.
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