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Preventive Medicine

NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The federal government should regulate e-cigarettes and states should forbid their sale to minors, but an outright ban would collide with the public health goal of reducing harm where possible, public health officials write in the New England Journal of Medicine. E-cigarettes, battery-operated nicotine delivery devices that look like conventional cigarettes but emit vapor instead of smoke, have become the subject of increasing public health and regulatory debate as their popularity grows.  Sales in this country are projected to reach $1.7 billion this year, and studies show their use growing among young people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1993
It was with considerable interest and nostalgia that I read your article (March 28) on health care in Rochester, N.Y., and its possible role as a model for national health-care reform. Having spent eight years at the University of Rochester as an undergraduate and medical student, I feel that I can cast some additional perspective on that community and its health-care system. There are multiple reasons why such a system may be difficult to emulate. The University of Rochester has among the finest medical and nursing schools in the nation, and ones in which the community medicine department has had an unusually long, special and active role in the community.
SCIENCE
March 22, 2009 | Shari Roan
Los Angeles has one of the highest diabetes-related amputation rates in the country. Yet vascular surgeon Dr. George Andros can't seem to draw enough attention to the problem, which has skyrocketed not just here but nationally. "It's not sexy," he acknowledges. "Who cares about diabetic feet? It has no sizzle." Over the last 15 years, the U.S. rate of foot amputations from complications of diabetes has soared, approaching 100,000 annually, according to studies and government statistics.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2012 | David Lazarus
Americans eat too damn much. And we all pay a rising cost for this gluttony in the form of higher insurance premiums and lost productivity. A study last year by the Society of Actuaries calculated the total economic cost of an overweight and obese population in the United States and Canada at about $300 billion a year (with 90% of that figure attributable to America's dietary issues). Now comes word from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that, if current trends continue, about 42% of the U.S. population will be obese by 2030.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1990
In response to "Vigilantes String Up the Marlboro Man," by Bruce Fein and Edwin Meese, Commentary, Aug. 19: I have not read such arrogant, overblown hogwash since Spiro Agnew was attacking "nattering nabobs." Their column contains so many errors of fact and unfair innuendoes that it is hard to know where to begin in making a response. I will limit myself to just one issue. The authors state: "Wilfred Dewey smoked cigarettes for four decades before his 1980 death . . . (and)
OPINION
October 3, 2012
Re "French unveil 75% supertax," Sept. 29 The article forgets to mention what the French get in return for their high tax rates. All French citizens have access to nearly free medical care, and in emergencies, doctors make house calls. The French get paid maternity leave for 16 weeks and free medical leave to take care of a sick relative. Nurses visit homes for free, private day care is heavily subsidized and parents receive a subsidy for every child born. Single parents get an additional allowance.
HEALTH
January 11, 2010
Setting the pace Getting 10,000 steps per day roughly coincides with the latest U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommendation that adults get a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. The key word here is "moderate" -- not all steps meet that requirement. Shuffling around the kitchen making dinner is hardly equivalent to racing to catch a bus or walking an energetic dog. Any movement is good, of course, but to make the steps count as beneficial as possible, they should be fairly sustained.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public health physician and the brothel-keeper were destined to hook up. Dr. Gary Richwald, a former UCLA professor who directs Los Angeles County's sexually transmitted disease program, had spent much of the last decade studying what he calls "sex industry workers." Russ Reade, a longtime Northern California high school biology and sex-education teacher, had left the classroom in search of riches 10 years ago, buying and managing one of Nevada's most famed houses of legal prostitution.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
As a parent, I never wished popularity on my children; it takes a lot of work to stay on top. And researchers have come up with a reason I hadn't thought of: Popular kids are more likely to smoke cigarettes, they say. The conclusion, published Wednesday in the Journal of Adolescent Health, is based on surveys among teenagers in ninth and 10 th grades at seven predominantly Latino high schools in the Los Angeles area. It confirms previous studies about high school students in the U.S. and Mexico.
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