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Preventive Medicine

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1993
It was with considerable interest and nostalgia that I read your article (March 28) on health care in Rochester, N.Y., and its possible role as a model for national health-care reform. Having spent eight years at the University of Rochester as an undergraduate and medical student, I feel that I can cast some additional perspective on that community and its health-care system. There are multiple reasons why such a system may be difficult to emulate. The University of Rochester has among the finest medical and nursing schools in the nation, and ones in which the community medicine department has had an unusually long, special and active role in the community.
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OPINION
January 22, 2012
The Obama administration's willingness to defend insurance coverage for family planning services against attacks from conservatives and religious groups is good news for women and for the health of the nation. Last year, the administration first proposed that, like other preventive medical goods and services, contraception and general family planning coverage should be available under the healthcare reform law without a co-payment or deductible. Not just churches but many of their affiliated organizations protested — with the backing of conservative Republicans — that they should not have to pay to provide insurance coverage for medical services that run counter to their beliefs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1990
In response to "Vigilantes String Up the Marlboro Man," by Bruce Fein and Edwin Meese, Commentary, Aug. 19: I have not read such arrogant, overblown hogwash since Spiro Agnew was attacking "nattering nabobs." Their column contains so many errors of fact and unfair innuendoes that it is hard to know where to begin in making a response. I will limit myself to just one issue. The authors state: "Wilfred Dewey smoked cigarettes for four decades before his 1980 death . . . (and)
OPINION
October 3, 2012
Re "French unveil 75% supertax," Sept. 29 The article forgets to mention what the French get in return for their high tax rates. All French citizens have access to nearly free medical care, and in emergencies, doctors make house calls. The French get paid maternity leave for 16 weeks and free medical leave to take care of a sick relative. Nurses visit homes for free, private day care is heavily subsidized and parents receive a subsidy for every child born. Single parents get an additional allowance.
HEALTH
January 11, 2010
Setting the pace Getting 10,000 steps per day roughly coincides with the latest U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommendation that adults get a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. The key word here is "moderate" -- not all steps meet that requirement. Shuffling around the kitchen making dinner is hardly equivalent to racing to catch a bus or walking an energetic dog. Any movement is good, of course, but to make the steps count as beneficial as possible, they should be fairly sustained.
HEALTH
July 12, 2010 | By Francesca Lunzer Kritz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Is there an app for that?" When it comes to consumer healthcare applications for smart phones, the answer, increasingly, is yes. There are now close to 6,000 consumer health apps, according to a review published in March by mobihealthnews, which reports on the mobile health industry, and more are being added every day. Many are free, or cost $1 to $10 to download. Some physicians are concerned about the reliability of the medical information provided by many of these apps, which offer advice and information on a wide array of health topics, including how to find a doctor, first aid for an emergency and exercise instructions.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public health physician and the brothel-keeper were destined to hook up. Dr. Gary Richwald, a former UCLA professor who directs Los Angeles County's sexually transmitted disease program, had spent much of the last decade studying what he calls "sex industry workers." Russ Reade, a longtime Northern California high school biology and sex-education teacher, had left the classroom in search of riches 10 years ago, buying and managing one of Nevada's most famed houses of legal prostitution.
HEALTH
July 3, 2006 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Americans will go to great lengths to protect themselves from medical risks -- even when the level of risk is unclear or unproven. The threat of mad cow disease drives some people to boycott beef, pesticide concerns lead others to eat only organic foods, and fears about vaccine safety prevent some parents from immunizing their children. Ironically, some of these same people fail to act against serious, and well-documented, medical risks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
A little preventive medicine went a long way when saving a historic Canoga Park firehouse, now the Canoga Park Community Center, from destruction. For the second time in a little more than a decade, the center will be dedicated, this time after being remodeled and retrofitted to repair damage sustained in the Northridge earthquake. "This building is unique in the community," said Glenn Kirby, president of the center.
SCIENCE
December 3, 2009 | By Jeannine Stein
Americans have increased their life expectancy by cutting back on cigarettes, but the pounds they're packing on mean that, ultimately, they could lose ground. A New England Journal of Medicine study published Wednesday looked at previous national health surveys to forecast life expectancy and quality of life for a typical 18-year-old from 2005 through 2020. Declines in smoking over the last 15 years would give that 18-year-old an increased life expectancy of 0.31 years. However, growing body mass index rates would also mean that that teen would have a reduced life expectancy of 1.02 years, giving a net life expectancy reduction of 0.71 years.
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