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Primary Elections

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1992
What's wrong with our democratic system? Nothing! It is we the people who are wrong. We use the excuse that we don't like any of the people running for office so we don't vote. Well, there is one of the main reasons we are at fault. How do government officials know we don't like what they are doing if we don't tell them? In my book, those people who do not vote do not have the right to gripe; they did not use their opportunity to do something about it. Don't tell me one vote does not count.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2012 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
In the first broad test of California's new "top-two" election system, many candidates in heated races for Congress and the state Legislature have been campaigning earlier, spending more money and downplaying their party affiliation as they try to widen their appeal. Gone are the party primaries, except in the presidential race. Now all state candidates appear on a single ballot. Only those who come in first or second on June 5 will move on to the November general election, in which no write-in or other added candidates will be allowed.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Rejecting a bipartisan plea by the two major political parties, a federal appeals court Thursday upheld California's blanket balloting law, meaning voters can continue to mix-and-match their candidates in next year's primary elections, regardless of political affiliation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2001 | DALONDO MOULTRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A panel of federal judges in Los Angeles has refused to postpone March primary elections in several congressional districts as requested in a lawsuit challenging the state's recently enacted redistricting plan, officials said Tuesday. The three-judge panel said a temporary restraining order sought by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund was denied because the nonprofit group's arguments did not overcome the public need for regular, undisrupted elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1986
Primary elections allow voters to judge which of their political party's candidates is best qualified to run for office in general elections. The system works well--when the political parties let it. The problem is that the major parties, Republicans and Democrats, do everything possible to discourage contested primaries.
NEWS
August 19, 1987 | From the Associated Press
A federal appeals court Tuesday struck down California's turn-of-the-century law preventing political parties from endorsing candidates in primary elections, calling it "paternalism that is inconsistent with the First Amendment." The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals also overturned state laws from the same period that dictate parties' internal structure, including the membership and size of party central committees and the terms of office of their leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999
Sunday in Mexico's first-ever primary election, the party in power showed its strength and delivered an impressive victory for the candidate of the establishment, Francisco Labastida. Despite this business-as-usual outcome, things have irreversibly changed in Mexico's political landscape, because for the first time it was 10 million voters, not a powerful politician, making the decision.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday set March 19 as the date for special primary elections to fill vacancies in three legislative districts, including the central Orange County Senate seat left empty by Wilson's appointment of John Seymour to the U.S. Senate. March 19 primaries were also scheduled in the 26th Assembly District in the central San Joaquin Valley and the sprawling 1st Senate District in Northern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997
Re "Central O.C. Candidates Begin Testing Waters Early," July 14: As politicians gird their loins for the 1998 primary elections, one wonders if this will be the election when the "Great Awakening" occurs. That is, when Republican voters decide that they are fed up with the religious right who have taken over the Republican Party in Orange County and who offer only religious right candidates such as Robert K. Dornan, Dana Rohrabacher, Scott Baugh and Rob Hurtt. Given the fact that no moderate Republican would-be candidate has a chance to run, how many Republicans will vote Democratic this election as they did in the last election when Loretta Sanchez was elected?
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