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September 11, 1997 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born 75 years later, John Galsworthy no doubt would have found a lucrative career as a television writer. Sure, he won a Nobel Prize for literature in 1932. But his 1927 play "Escape!" now revived at the Chandler Studio, reminds us that the theater was--and can be--as easy to watch as TV. "Escape!" has that mix of comedy and drama, suspense and adventure that makes for that kind of popular storytelling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1997 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born 75 years later, John Galsworthy no doubt would have found a lucrative career as a television writer. Sure, he won a Nobel Prize for literature in 1932. But his 1927 play "Escape!" now revived at the Chandler Studio, reminds us that the theater was--and can be--as easy to watch as TV. "Escape!" has that mix of comedy and drama, suspense and adventure that makes for that kind of popular storytelling.
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NEWS
June 17, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marvin Goldfarb, motion picture distributor and buyer adept at choosing box office successes from unfinished films, has died at the age of 84. Goldfarb, an entertainment executive for six decades, died Friday in Los Angeles. In early 1978, he saw a six-minute clip of an unfinished science fiction movie and decided to take a chance. He bid $35,000 for the opportunity to show it. The film was "Star Wars," and it grossed $2 million during a 53-week run at two of his Denver theaters.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1996 | Mark Ehrman
At the dawn of the '90s, video distributor Tim Crawford stumbled upon some obscure but compelling documentaries about UFOs. Crawford knew--just knew--it was an encounter that would change his life. "I saw this material and I thought, 'Wow, every video store in America should have this,' " says the 36-year-old self-styled "UFOlogist." So it was that, well before Hollywood's latest space-invader obsession, Crawford divined that "this was a genre about to explode" and set about exploiting it.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
  Paul Thomas Anderson's film"The Master" -- highly anticipated in part because its story seems to have much in common with Scientology --  will debut a month earlier than originally scheduled. Weinstein Co. announced Friday that it will open the Philip Seymour Hoffman-starrer on Sept. 14 in New York and Los Angeles, with an expansion to other cities planned for the following weekend. As part of its plans, the company is shifting its Brad Pitt-starrer "Killing Them Softly," which they acquired before this year's Cannes Film Festival, from Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2003 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Harry Potter and Bugs Bunny don't have to worry -- yet -- but Warner Bros. is gearing up for a big multimedia push, one that just happens to involve animated pint-sized Mexican wrestlers. Warner Bros. Animation has tapped its first-season Kids' WB! series "Mucha Lucha!" -- about the comic adventures of masked wrestlers Rikochet, Buena Girl and the Flea -- as its potential next big brand.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991 | RAY LOYND
Tired of hate? Feel like a five-Kleenex movie? "Mrs. Lambert Remembers Love," with captivating performances by Ellen Burstyn and Walter Matthau, won't leave a tear-duct dry Sunday (at 9 p.m. on Channels 2 and 8). This is the kind of plot that theatrical movies won't touch. The material is even rare for a network prime-time movie. It's a character drama, and the characters are old people, plus a little kid--not exactly a high concept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Burns, a onetime jazz musician who fashioned a diverse career as an arranger, winning two Academy Awards, a Tony Award and an Emmy while helping expand the range of several popular artists, died Wednesday in Los Angeles. He was 79. Burns died at St. Vincent's Hospital of complications from a recent stroke as well as pneumonia, according to a spokesman for his business manager.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1993 | RAYMUND A. PAREDES, Paredes is associate vice chancellor for academic development at UCLA. and
Terry Pristin's article "A Matter of 'Honor' " (Calendar, May 21), offers a gloomy assessment of Hollywood's interest in and ability to deal with Latino subjects. But there is every reason to believe that the situation is even worse than the author indicates. As a scholar of Latino literature, I am occasionally contacted by producers and writers interested in learning about Latino literary works that might be adaptable to film or television.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1991 | TOM FLANNERY, Flannery is a free-lance writer whose first book, "1939: The Year in Movies," was published last year by McFarland and Co. He has written articles for Newsday and Social Justice Review
In his article "The Best Year of Our Films" (Calendar, July 11), critic Michael Wilmington asserted that 1941 was not only the first year of the Modern Era but that it was also the single greatest year in the history of the American movie industry. Well, he may be right on the first point, but the second is certainly debatable. Not only did 1939 produce more great films than 1941--films considered classics today, 50 years later--but it also produced nearly twice as many.
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