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November 7, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Doctor Turns Himself In to Authorities: David G. Gardner, a neurosurgeon charged in what prosecutors are calling a $4.2-million tax-fraud and money-laundering conspiracy, surrendered to authorities in Los Angeles. Gardner founded Primedex Corp., a health care company that was one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California during the late 1980s and early 1990s.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neurosurgeon accused of masterminding one of the biggest workers' compensation scams in Southern California in the late 1980s and early 1990s has been hit with additional criminal charges in the alleged fraud. The expanded indictment announced Friday by the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office against the doctor, David Gardner, 53, also named two new defendants in the case.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neurosurgeon accused of masterminding one of the biggest workers' compensation scams in Southern California in the late 1980s and early 1990s has been hit with additional criminal charges in the alleged fraud. The expanded indictment announced Friday by the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office against the doctor, David Gardner, 53, also named two new defendants in the case.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Doctor Turns Himself In to Authorities: David G. Gardner, a neurosurgeon charged in what prosecutors are calling a $4.2-million tax-fraud and money-laundering conspiracy, surrendered to authorities in Los Angeles. Gardner founded Primedex Corp., a health care company that was one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California during the late 1980s and early 1990s.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neurosurgeon who founded one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California during the early 1990s has been charged in what authorities are calling a $4.2-million tax-fraud and money-laundering conspiracy. The Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Wednesday that it filed five felony counts against David G. Gardner, the Los Angeles doctor who founded the chain of workers' compensation clinics known as Primedex Corp.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government investigators served search warrants on more than 40 medical offices in Southern California as part of a probe focusing on a widely advertised workers' compensation referral service called the Injury Hotline, authorities said Wednesday. The operation was touted as part of a major investigation by agencies including the Los Angeles district attorney's office, the California Department of Insurance and the FBI into suspected fraud in the state's $12-billion workers' compensation system.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Primedex Corp., one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California, announced Thursday that it is pulling out of the business of treating injured employees. The Culver City-based firm--whose referral and billing practices are under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office--said it will lay off 225 of its 300 employees.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN Times Staff Writer
Turn on daytime television, and it's seemingly impossible to miss the commercials. A helicopter newsman bursts onto the screen, "reporting" for something called "Injury Central." Soon a worker appears, writhing in pain after tumbling to the pavement while unloading a truck. And then comes the pitch: Call Injury Central toll-free to get "all the medical and monetary benefits available through your employer's insurance. This means no cost to you. You owe it to yourself and those who count on you."
BUSINESS
June 26, 1999 | Stuart Silverstein
A neurosurgeon has been ordered to pay $250,000 in fines and sentenced to five years' probation after his conviction in Los Angeles County Superior Court on three money-laundering charges. The doctor, David Gardner of Calabasas, still awaits trial on securities and insurance fraud charges.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Southern California's largest operators of clinics for injured workers has sued several insurance companies, charging that delays in paying claims has nearly ruined its business. In a suit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court late Friday, Irvine-based Tricare Inc., which operates Veritas Medical Group Inc. among other clinics, said insurers have raised numerous objections to medical evaluations and delayed payments for up to 400 days.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neurosurgeon who founded one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California during the early 1990s has been charged in what authorities are calling a $4.2-million tax-fraud and money-laundering conspiracy. The Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Wednesday that it filed five felony counts against David G. Gardner, the Los Angeles doctor who founded the chain of workers' compensation clinics known as Primedex Corp.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Primedex Corp., one of the biggest and most controversial workers' compensation medical enterprises in Southern California, announced Thursday that it is pulling out of the business of treating injured employees. The Culver City-based firm--whose referral and billing practices are under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office--said it will lay off 225 of its 300 employees.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN Times Staff Writer
Turn on daytime television, and it's seemingly impossible to miss the commercials. A helicopter newsman bursts onto the screen, "reporting" for something called "Injury Central." Soon a worker appears, writhing in pain after tumbling to the pavement while unloading a truck. And then comes the pitch: Call Injury Central toll-free to get "all the medical and monetary benefits available through your employer's insurance. This means no cost to you. You owe it to yourself and those who count on you."
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government investigators served search warrants on more than 40 medical offices in Southern California as part of a probe focusing on a widely advertised workers' compensation referral service called the Injury Hotline, authorities said Wednesday. The operation was touted as part of a major investigation by agencies including the Los Angeles district attorney's office, the California Department of Insurance and the FBI into suspected fraud in the state's $12-billion workers' compensation system.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles man with links to notorious fraud schemes was arrested Tuesday for allegedly submitting false information to obtain a $150,000 loan from a Costa Mesa lender. Stanley Goldblum, 72, was arrested as he was attending a court hearing in Los Angeles on unrelated charges that he participated in a scheme to operate a number of medical clinics that allegedly bilked the workers' compensation system, Costa Mesa police said. Goldblum was out on $2 million bail stemming from that case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993
Finally, Sacramento appears serious about reforming the state's disastrous workers' compensation system. Last Thursday the Senate overwhelming approved its version of a workers' compensation reform bill designed to reduce at least $800 million in employers' insurance premiums next year. Also last week, the Assembly, in a rare unanimous vote on a major issue, approved its version of a reform measure, which as currently written would save substantially more than the Senate version.
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