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HOME & GARDEN
January 19, 2013
The Solidoodle is hardly the only 3-D printer attracting attention from those looking to play with the latest technology. More than a dozen printers are trying to capture slices of the market, though some of the devices require assembly or lack the kind of hand-holding tech support that the typical American consumer has come to expect. But make no mistake: 3-D printing is spreading. Aaron Pratt, vice president of marketing for manufacturer Afinia, said the first buyers of his company's H-Series printer were early-adopter hobbyists, but in the last few months the company has seen a surge in sales from high schools, where teachers have incorporated the machines into the science curriculum, and from colleges, where professors are using the hardware for discussions on everything from design to the future of American manufacturing.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
LAS VEGAS -- Even though 3D printing is all the rage at the Consumer Electronics Show, many people outside the industry are still puzzled by all the fuss. "Explain 3D printers to me. Why are they useful?" one non-techie friend of mine tweeted me this week, after I posted a picture of a 3D printer at the show. By the way, there are 28 3D printing exhibitors at the show, up from just eight in 2013, according to Gary Shapiro, the president and chief executive of the Consumer Electronics Assn., which organizes the show.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Responding to new technology, state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) says he will introduce legislation to prohibit the use of 3-D printing devices to make usable firearms. Yee said he is alarmed by news reports that a plastic firearm has been designed and made with a 3-D printer and was able to fire bullets. A 3-D printer extrudes layers of plastic to produce almost any three-dimensional shape desired. Yee is concerned that guns made with 3-D printers can be untraceable and made by people who do not undergo background checks.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Carren Jao
DIYers, bibliophiles, buyers or makers of handmade crafts - actually, anyone who appreciates the tangible results of the printing process - can rejoice at the annual Printers Fair, Oct. 5 at the International Printing Museum in Carson. “Printing, graphics and paper are all around us but we never think about it,” said Mark Barbour, curator and founding director of the museum. At the fair, he said, “those worlds come alive. Visitors can really get hands-on in the process and it's magic.
HOME & GARDEN
January 19, 2013 | By R. Daniel Foster
At its most basic level, a 3-D printer is like an automated hot-glue gun programmed to spit out solid objects. The machines extrude layers of plastic into virtually any three-dimensional shape. Print whimsical garden statuary. Reproduce an anatomically correct heart with moving parts for your son's science project (actually, he could do that himself). Create a signature bookend, cookie cutter, necklace - anything. The buzz within the design world is that most homes could have one of these gadgets within 10 years.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | United Press International
One of London's most spectacular fires in years Tuesday destroyed a giant warehouse belonging to news baron Rupert Murdoch and sparked a war of words between his company and fired printers over who set it. As he surveyed damage estimated at $9 million to the riverside newsprint-storage building, Bruce Matthews, managing director of Murdoch's News International parent company, blamed it on sabotage by printers Murdoch fired four months ago in a dispute over new technology .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Mary Rourke, Special to the Los Angeles Times
June Wayne, who helped pioneer a revival of fine-art print making in the 1960s when she founded the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, has died. She was 93. An accomplished artist in her own right, Wayne died Tuesday at her home in Los Angeles after a long illness, according to her assistant, Larry Workman. Wayne gained an international reputation starting in 1960 when she began to invite leading artists to collaborate with professional printers at Tamarind and create artist's prints.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
LAS VEGAS -- Even though 3D printing is all the rage at the Consumer Electronics Show, many people outside the industry are still puzzled by all the fuss. "Explain 3D printers to me. Why are they useful?" one non-techie friend of mine tweeted me this week, after I posted a picture of a 3D printer at the show. By the way, there are 28 3D printing exhibitors at the show, up from just eight in 2013, according to Gary Shapiro, the president and chief executive of the Consumer Electronics Assn., which organizes the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist
For several years, Marie Calloway, 23, has explicitly described her lifestyle and sexual exploits on her blog. Now Calloway (a pseudonym she has used since the age of 19) has published a book, "what purpose did i serve in your life" ( Tyrant Books , $19), said to be an account of her sexual encounters.   In "what purpose did i serve in your life," Calloway opens up about her relationships, which predominantly originate from cyber contact, as well as her sexual fantasies, largely involving self-degradation.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1989
Datametrics has named James D. Sturgeon Jr. vice president of operations. Sturgeon, 55, was previously vice president of operations at Resdel Engineering Corp. in Arcadia. Datametrics is a Chatsworth maker of printers for the military.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2013 | By Shan Li
NASA is planning to send a 3-D printer into space and use it as a mini factory to churn out tools and instruments, sparing astronauts the hassle of lugging spare parts on each mission, according to a report. The printer is slated to go into space in the fall of 2014 on a supply mission, Associated Press said. NASA engineers envision a time when 3-D printers can print virtually any part that is needed and avert potential catastrophes in outer space. PHOTOS: Best states for doing business in 2013 "Any time we realize we can 3-D print something in space, it's like Christmas," Andrew Filo, a consultant with NASA on the printing project, told AP. "You can get rid of concepts like rationing, scarce or irreplaceable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The world's first guns made by a 3-D printer will join the ranks of some of the world's finest art. London's Victoria & Albert museum announced it's buying a pair of pistols, known as Liberators, for an undisclosed price to add to its Design Festival on display through Sept. 22. The museum, which has displayed priceless pearls from the Roman Empire and treasures from Russia's royal courts, purchased the pistols and some related parts from Defense Distributed, a nonprofit digital publisher that created the weapons.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2013 | Shan Li
Diego Porqueras' Deezmaker store in Pasadena is a geeky version of Santa's workshop, brimming with action figures, chess pieces and jewelry. But instead of relying on elves, Porqueras has built his own one-man factory using 3-D printers capable of churning out plastic objects within a few hours. He sells the printers, which go for as little as $650, at the shop, which opened in September in a strip mall. The 37-year-old entrepreneur is part of an emerging industry for affordable 3-D printers.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2013 | By Shan Li
Three-dimensional printing giant Stratasys Ltd. is venturing into the burgeoning consumer market for affordable 3-D printers by acquiring rival MakerBot Industries for $403 million in stock. Stratasys said the deal will enable the Eden Prairie, Minn., company to offer affordable desktop printers, which is Makerbot's specialty. The deal is yet another sign of the emerging market for consumer 3-D printers, which are machines that "print" 3-D objects typically by depositing layer upon layer of material following a software-created design.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist
For several years, Marie Calloway, 23, has explicitly described her lifestyle and sexual exploits on her blog. Now Calloway (a pseudonym she has used since the age of 19) has published a book, "what purpose did i serve in your life" ( Tyrant Books , $19), said to be an account of her sexual encounters.   In "what purpose did i serve in your life," Calloway opens up about her relationships, which predominantly originate from cyber contact, as well as her sexual fantasies, largely involving self-degradation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Responding to new technology, state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) says he will introduce legislation to prohibit the use of 3-D printing devices to make usable firearms. Yee said he is alarmed by news reports that a plastic firearm has been designed and made with a 3-D printer and was able to fire bullets. A 3-D printer extrudes layers of plastic to produce almost any three-dimensional shape desired. Yee is concerned that guns made with 3-D printers can be untraceable and made by people who do not undergo background checks.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1986
Dwight F. Ryan was named president of Xerox Corp.'s special markets group, headquartered in El Segundo. The new group will develop, manufacture and market entry-level and specialized products such as electronic typewriters, engineering copiers, graphics equipment and printers.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2013 | By Shan Li
What do houses, human organs, food and guns have in common? According to panelists at the Milken Institute Global Conference, it's 3-D printing, the technology that enables people to print three-dimensional products by precisely depositing layer upon layer of material. Innovators are working on creating entire buildings and human parts such as bones using the high-tech printers, said Avi Reichental, chief executive of printing firm 3-D Systems Corp. "All of this activity is happening as we speak," he said at the panel.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
What's billed as "the world's first gun made with 3D printer technology" had its BBC premiere Monday with a video demonstrating how, with the exception of one small metal pin, the weapon is wholly constructed of plastic components made with a machine bought on EBay. As L.A. at Home reported in January, 3D printer technology is advancing toward the mass market, for better or for worse. Although our Solidoodle 2 review revealed that some low-cost models are not quite ready for prime time, a surprising number of 3D printers now can be bought for a fraction of the $8,000 reportedly paid for the machinery that created the gun. The 3D-printed gun's maker is Cody Wilson, described by BBC science reporter Rebecca Morelle as a 25-year-old law student at the University of Texas.
SCIENCE
May 2, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Need a new ear? In the future you may be able to print one out and pop it on. Taking us one step closer to a future in which we are all part human, part machine, scientists at Princeton University have created a pair of high functioning bionic ears made of a mix of cellular material, silicone and electronics and printed them using a $1,000, off-the-shelf, 3-D printer. The "designer cyborg ears," as the researchers call them, look a lot like regular ears but have the potential to hear frequencies way beyond the reach of normal human hearing.
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