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NEWS
August 29, 1997 | Associated Press
The late Marvel Comics editor Mark Gruenwald got his wish: His ashes were blended with ink and made into a comic book. "This is something that he really wanted because he really loved comics. He wanted to be part of his work in a very real sense," said Mark Harras, Marvel's editor in chief. The ashes of Marvel's senior executive editor were mixed at a printing plant in Canton, Ohio, for use in "Squadron Supreme," a reprint of a limited edition 1985 comic he wrote, Harras said Thursday.
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NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Is it R.I.P. for the OED, paper version? The fountainhead for all things about English could come to exist, like Johnny Depp in “Transcendence,” only in an online incarnation. The English language has somewhere between 800,000 and 1 million words, and the Oxford English Dictionary is dedicated to bringing you the lineage and usage of every one of them. The third edition is in the works, but that's not headline news - it has been in development for at least 20 years. When it does appear, it could run to 40 volumes, twice as long as the second edition from only 35 years ago. And that could spell the last of anything but a virtual OED. There's “too big to fail” and, maybe, “too big to print.” The speed at which the language metastasizes has always made it hard for dictionaries to keep up. (Just take a gander at “Ball of Fire,” one of my favorite movies: Barbara Stanwyck plays a nightclub chanteuse, Gary Cooper a slang-deprived lexicographer.)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2009 | Eric Bailey and Patrick McGreevy
Deep in debt and short on cash, California on Thursday churned out its first batch of IOUs in nearly two decades amid grumbles from bankers, growing public outrage and scant progress in negotiations to resolve the state's widening budget deficit. The state controller's office fired up a pair of printing presses and began rolling out nearly 29,000 IOUs totaling more than $53 million, most of them destined for residents around the state still awaiting income tax refunds.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2014 | Shan Li
Commuters at Union Station in downtown L.A. got an early look Wednesday at the first edition of the Los Angeles Register. A small group of reporters and editors wearing T-shirts stating "A New Voice in L.A. " handed out copies to commuters emerging from trains and subways on their way to work. The paper is the latest effort by Aaron Kushner, co-owner of parent company Freedom Communications Inc., to push his belief that print still sells well in the modern era of digital media.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS
In the market for an inkjet printer? Get ready for a tough decision. The manufacturers are dumping new models on the market with dizzying speed. We asked Bruce Brown, contributing editor of PC Magazine, for some shopping tips. Here's what to look for when comparing inkjet hardware, in rough order of importance: * Print quality. Many inkjet cartridges use combinations of three colors--cyan, magenta and yellow--to produce a full palette.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1987
Running a printing shop no longer requires a love of graphics and the proverbial black thumb (ink stains). Would-be Gutenbergs come from all walks of life, and at least half of all quick-printing store owners have no printing experience whatever when they enter the business, said Larry Hunt, a construction company sales manager until he bought his first copy center in 1973. He now owns three copy centers in Florida's Tampa Bay area. "It takes management skills.
SPORTS
March 15, 1986
I was relieved to learn from Scott Ostler that my newspaper of choice prints "only the bare minimum when it comes to gambling information--the football point spreads once a week--because the people in charge of making such decisions don't see gambling as an activity to be actively pursued." Assured in the knowledge that this subscriber does not contribute in the slightest to the evils of gambling, I then turned the page to locate the "Best bet--TURBO DELIGHT (3rd)" at Los Alamitos.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
In a country where censorship of all printed matter has been the law for 66 years and where possession of a photocopier has required a special government license, an American-franchised printing shop opened last week with hopes that two dozen more will follow. Kniga Printshop, a joint venture between Phargo Management & Consulting Ltd. of Toronto and a Soviet book publisher, has opened what amounts to not only the Soviet Union's first fast-print operation but its most modern print shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
A wide swath of tickling playfulness ran through the '60s. For a lot of people now deep in middle age, the epoch represented a last chance to be really young, act silly, swear and spit. You'd never know it today, but the L.A. print-and-multiple-making outfit Gemini G.E.L. (for Graphics Editions Ltd.) was launched in the froth of that giddy spirit in 1966.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2000 | Karen Alexander
PrintNation.com in Irvine, an electronic commerce site for the commercial printing industry, said Monday that it has received $25.5 million in venture capital funding. Lehman Brothers Venture Partners, Partech International, U.S. Venture Partners and Venrock Associates provided the funding. The company said the money will enable it to expand its staff and its marketing programs.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
The goal of the Los Angeles Times is to publish a newspaper of the highest quality. This requires The Times to be, above all else, a principled newspaper. Making it so is the responsibility of every staff member. In deed and in appearance, journalists at The Times must keep themselves - and the newspaper - above reproach. The ways a newspaper can discredit itself are beyond calculation; these guidelines do not purport to cover them all. It is up to staff members to master these general principles and, beyond that, to listen carefully to their individual sense of right and wrong.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Susan Denley
Kelly Rowland's cute short bob came about when she fried her hair in a home coloring accident and sought out Beyonce's hairstylist, Neal Farinah, for help, Rowland tells People magazine. [People] Nick Cannon showed off his new -- and much talked about -- animal-print hairstyle on the "Live with Kelly and Michael" show on Tuesday. Though he called the style a cheetah print when he debuted it Monday, Cannon said Tuesday that he is emulating a leopard. [Live with Kelly and Michael]
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
After a slow start, 3-D printing is poised for a huge growth spurt in the next few years. The size of the market, including 3-D printer sales, materials and associated services, reached $2.5 billion worldwide last year, according to market research firm Canalys. That figure is expected to grow to $3.8 billion this year and soar to $16.2 billion globally by 2018. Canalys senior analyst Tim Shepherd said falling prices and advances in technology are making the printers an increasingly feasible option for enterprise and consumer uses.  PHOTOS: Comparing the HTC One (M8)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Art thief-turned-daredevil rider Crunch (Kurt Russell) - fresh from prison, having been burned by his weaselly partner-in-crime half-brother Nicky (Matt Dillon) - wants nothing more to do with heists. Yeah, right. "The Art of the Steal" is another Last Big Job concoction, albeit one in which writer-director Jonathan Sobol doubles down against staleness by stuffing his cast with appealing character actors who know their way around a profane quip (Terence Stamp, Jay Baruchel, Chris Diamantopoulos, Kenneth Welsh, Jason Jones)
IMAGE
March 9, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Flanked by giant Carrera marble planters shaped like skulls, designer Paula Thomas stands in the courtyard of the first stand-alone boutique for her upscale global fashion brand, Thomas Wylde. "I love the dark and macabre, but I try to turn that into an aesthetic that is beautiful, alluring and abstract," says the British-born, Los Angeles-based Thomas, whose label merges a streetwise, rock 'n' roll vibe with feminine sophistication. Located next to company headquarters in Culver City, the store opened on Feb. 20, simultaneously celebrating Thomas' 48th birthday and the debut of a made-in-L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By David Colker
Stanley Grinstein, who played a pivotal role in the art scene in Los Angeles as it was evolving in the 1960s and '70s, was an unlikely candidate for that role. He was not an artist or even, at the beginning, a collector. He was in the forklift business and had a great fondness for USC football. But in 1952, Grinstein got married and he and his wife, Elyse, went in search of a pastime they could mutually enjoy. "They were looking for something they could do together, some kind of common ground," said their daughter Ayn Grinstein.
IMAGE
February 28, 2014 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
It wasn't Windansea Beach itself but a detour taken while trying to find a parking spot there that led to the mother lode of inspiration for Jonathan Cohen's spring collection. The 28-year-old designer, who grew up near the fabled beach in La Jolla and is now based in New York, had recently reread "The Pump House Gang," Tom Wolfe's 1968 story about rowdy teens who hung out at the pump house at Windansea, defending their sandy turf from the over-25 set. When he was home last March, Cohen was determined to see the place with fresh eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
NEW YORK - What is a photograph? From photography's very beginning, there has always been more than one answer to that question. On the medium's official launch in 1839, a photograph was both a precise, one-of-a-kind image permanently fixed on a mirror-like metal plate (the Daguerreotype) and a replicable print on paper, made from a paper negative (the calotype, or photogenic drawing). Ever since, what photographs look and feel like has continued to evolve with changing technology and aesthetic intent.
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