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Prior Restraint

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NEWS
May 3, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court on Monday sidestepped ruling on whether a federal judge may stop a newspaper from publishing legally obtained information and instead dismissed on jurisdictional grounds an appeal from an attorney appointed to represent the federal government. The high court move spares the Providence, R.I., Journal and its executive editor, Charles M. Hauser, from further legal action growing out of a 1985 article reporting 20-year-old FBI wiretaps on a reputed crime boss, Raymond J.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2013 | By Victoria Kim
A union representing Los Angeles Sheriff's Department deputies on Tuesday unsuccessfully sought a court order to stop the Los Angeles Times from publishing information from officers' background screenings. The union, the Assn. for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, filed an emergency motion against The Times and a Times reporter Tuesday morning, alleging the reporter was unlawfully in possession of background investigation files containing personal information of about 500 deputies. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Joanne O'Donnell denied the union's motion, writing in her ruling that the union failed to present “the evidence most critical to the showing of irreparable harm or immediate danger.” “The court declines to issue [an order]
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's attorneys failed to persuade a Los Angeles judge on Thursday night to block media outlets from publishing some of Mahony's confidential e-mails, the cardinal met the same fate as many powerful interests over the past 70 years. Since the landmark 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Near vs. Minnesota, it has been very difficult for individuals, large corporations or even the U.S. government to get a "prior restraint" against the press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2013 | By Victoria Kim
A union representing Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputies Tuesday unsuccessfully sought a court order to stop the Los Angeles Times from publishing information from officers' background screenings. The Assn. for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs filed an emergency motion against The Times and a Times reporter Tuesday morning, alleging that the reporter unlawfully possessed background investigation files containing personal information of about 500 deputies. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Joanne O'Donnell denied the union's motion, writing that the union failed to present "the evidence most critical to the showing of irreparable harm or immediate danger.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
No one with an ounce of sense would minimize the pain and loss endured by Americans in the post-9/11, post-Enron era that began so shockingly in Lower Manhattan a little more than a year ago. Nor should any sensible person dismiss the continuing peril posed by terrorists acting under the color of Islamo-fascism and by those corporate crooks whose deceits have betrayed -- and, in many cases, beggared -- millions of trusting employees and investors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Costa Mesa City Council approved new arts grant restrictions Tuesday forbidding the use of city money for "obscene matters," or "for the conduct of any religious or political activity." But the action appeased neither critics, who had lobbied for even stricter regulations on arts groups, nor arts activists who questioned the need for such measures. "Where is the problem that needs to be addressed?" asked Martin Benson, co-founder and artistic director of South Coast Repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Attorneys on both sides of the 2 Live Crew obscenity furor in Florida are questioning whether law-enforcement agencies in other states aren't guilty of "prior restraint" by warning retailers that they may be arrested for selling the rap group's latest album. Police in San Antonio, Tex., Prince William County, Va., and in four counties in South Carolina are the first authorities outside Florida's Broward County to act on U.S.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Cable News Network broadcast government-recorded tapes of conversations between deposed Panamanian leader Manuel A. Noriega and his lawyers, was the network taking a heroic stand for fair trials or was it inviting disaster to fall on press freedoms? That is the question journalists and attorneys are asking in the wake of the network's broadcast of a tape recordings of Noriega's phone calls with his attorneys.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The pop music obscenity battle moves from Florida to Texas today with jury selection scheduled to begin in the Bexar County trial of Hogwild Records store owner Dave Risher. Risher was charged with violating Texas obscenity penal codes on June 28 after he sold a copy of 2 Live Crew's raunchy rap record "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" to the 20-year-old son of San Antonio's leading anti-pornography crusader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2000
Re "Cure for the Initiative," editorial, Nov. 5: Prior restraint remedies like constitutionality tests and ballot argument reviews as fixes for the initiative process raise the question of who is going to perform these tests. The existence of neutral parties, even in the judiciary, is a fantasy. The major concern is that any changes would be used to keep initiatives off of the ballot altogether. Most issues dealt with by initiatives would never have been addressed by the state Legislature and would probably have been kept off of the ballot as initiatives if they had a prior-restraint vehicle.
OPINION
August 20, 2010
A unanimous panel of California's 2nd District Court of Appeal has at last cleaned up a shameful legal mess, ordering L.A. County Superior Court Judge Hilleri G. Merritt to end her prior restraint on the Los Angeles Times. Earlier this month, after first granting The Times the right to photograph a criminal defendant appearing in her courtroom, Merritt changed her mind and ordered the paper not to publish the lawfully taken picture. The Times, showing more respect for the law than Merritt did, obeyed her order while it appealed, first to her to reconsider and later, when she refused, to the higher court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
The California Court of Appeal on Thursday overturned a judge's order barring The Times from publishing "lawfully obtained photographs" of a murder suspect, calling the judge's actions "an unconstitutional prior restraint on speech. " Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Hilleri J. Merritt granted a request by L.A. Times photographer Al Seib during an Aug. 4 hearing to take pictures of Alberd Tersargyan, who is accused of killing three members of the same family as well as a prostitute on Sunset Boulevard.
OPINION
August 7, 2010 | Tim Rutten
There are judicial decisions you can ponder, others over which you argue, and some that just leave you shaking your head in slack-jawed wonder. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Hilleri G. Merritt's imposition of a prior restraint order on The Times falls squarely into the latter category. With the judge's permission, one of the paper's photographers shot pictures of a defendant charged with killing four people. Merritt then changed her mind and ordered the paper not to publish the images, despite the fact that the accused man's photo already has appeared on television and been posted on the Internet.
OPINION
February 3, 2007
ON MONDAY, the California Supreme Court wrestled with a free-speech controversy that pits a Newport Beach street preacher against a restaurant she has accused of such things as serving tainted food (with a side order of child pornography) and having Mafia ties. Anne Lemen, who is challenging a court order prohibiting her from repeating these and other libelous statements about the Balboa Island Village Inn, isn't the most sympathetic crusader for free speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2004 | William Overend, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for news organizations asked an appeals court Thursday to strike down a gag order in the Michael Jackson child molestation case. The request called the edict by Santa Barbara County Superior Court Judge Rodney S. Melville an unconstitutional prior restraint on the freedom of speech of "third parties who have not yet appeared before the trial court or otherwise become subject to the court's jurisdiction."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
No one with an ounce of sense would minimize the pain and loss endured by Americans in the post-9/11, post-Enron era that began so shockingly in Lower Manhattan a little more than a year ago. Nor should any sensible person dismiss the continuing peril posed by terrorists acting under the color of Islamo-fascism and by those corporate crooks whose deceits have betrayed -- and, in many cases, beggared -- millions of trusting employees and investors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1990
The Supreme Court, ignoring its own precedents, has let stand a federal judge's gag order forbidding Cable News Network from broadcasting tapes of Manuel Noriega's jailhouse telephone conversations. The court offered no explanation for its stunning and potentially far-reaching decision. Its 7-2 vote, refusing both CNN's emergency request to lift the stay and its appeal on the merits of the gag order, means that for now at least the effort to deny CNN its right of free speech remains in force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2013 | By Victoria Kim
A union representing Los Angeles Sheriff's Department deputies on Tuesday unsuccessfully sought a court order to stop the Los Angeles Times from publishing information from officers' background screenings. The union, the Assn. for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, filed an emergency motion against The Times and a Times reporter Tuesday morning, alleging the reporter was unlawfully in possession of background investigation files containing personal information of about 500 deputies. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Joanne O'Donnell denied the union's motion, writing in her ruling that the union failed to present “the evidence most critical to the showing of irreparable harm or immediate danger.” “The court declines to issue [an order]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's attorneys failed to persuade a Los Angeles judge on Thursday night to block media outlets from publishing some of Mahony's confidential e-mails, the cardinal met the same fate as many powerful interests over the past 70 years. Since the landmark 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Near vs. Minnesota, it has been very difficult for individuals, large corporations or even the U.S. government to get a "prior restraint" against the press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2002 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County community college district's policy prohibiting students from engaging in certain free-speech activities without permission from administrators is unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Monday. The judge found that South Orange County Community College District was exercising prior restraint in requiring approval for distributing leaflets in certain areas, posting information on a bulletin board, putting up a banner and using a loudspeaker at a rally. It was the second time U.
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